Madame Sans-Gêne (1925)

Comedy | 20 April 1925

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HISTORY

The Oct 1924 AmCin and Dec 1924 Photoplay reported that Gloria Swanson and Charles de Roehe were filming in Paris, France.
       The play Madame Sans-Gêne also was the basis of the 1963 French film Madame, directed by Christian-Jaque and starring Sophia Loren and Robert Hossein. For information on other screen adaptations, including the 1910 version, consult that entry. ...

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The Oct 1924 AmCin and Dec 1924 Photoplay reported that Gloria Swanson and Charles de Roehe were filming in Paris, France.
       The play Madame Sans-Gêne also was the basis of the 1963 French film Madame, directed by Christian-Jaque and starring Sophia Loren and Robert Hossein. For information on other screen adaptations, including the 1910 version, consult that entry.

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
LOCATION
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
American Cinematographer
Oct 1924
p. 12
Film Daily
26 Apr 1925
p. 6
Moving Picture World
2 May 1925
p. 47
New York Times
18 Apr 1925
p. 19
Photoplay
Dec 1924
p. 112
Variety
22 Apr 1925
p. 34
DETAILS
Release Date:
20 April 1925
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 17 Apr 1925
Production Date:

Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Famous Players-Lasky Corp.
23 April 1925
LP21388
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
9,994
Length(in reels):
10
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Catherine Hubscher, the proprietress of a laundry in Paris, is known as Madame Sans-Gêne. Among the clients of this carefree woman are Napoléon, a young artillery lieutenant, and Lefebvre, a handsome soldier. After the French Revolution, Napoléon becomes emperor and Lefebvre is appointed a field marshal with the title of Duke of Danzig. Catherine becomes the Duchess of Danzig and alienates Napoléon's sisters by her rough manners at court. Napoléon orders Lefebvre to divorce her but relents when she reminds him of his unpaid laundry bills and of her faithful service to the army during the ...

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Catherine Hubscher, the proprietress of a laundry in Paris, is known as Madame Sans-Gêne. Among the clients of this carefree woman are Napoléon, a young artillery lieutenant, and Lefebvre, a handsome soldier. After the French Revolution, Napoléon becomes emperor and Lefebvre is appointed a field marshal with the title of Duke of Danzig. Catherine becomes the Duchess of Danzig and alienates Napoléon's sisters by her rough manners at court. Napoléon orders Lefebvre to divorce her but relents when she reminds him of his unpaid laundry bills and of her faithful service to the army during the Revolution.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.