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HISTORY

The upcoming production was announced in the 7 July 1928 Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World as a vehicle for the Quillan vaudeville family, featuring juvenile star Eddie Quillan. George Dromgold and Sanford Hewitt were credited with the original story, and Virginia Bradford was mentioned as a prospective cast member in the 22 July 1928 New York Times. The 18 August 1928 Motion Picture News listed the film as one of eight Pathé features to be released with sound accompaniment. Nine days later, the 27 August 1928 Exhibitors Daily Review reported that Pathé replaced Dromgold and Hewitt with writer F. Hugh Herbert, who was on loan from Paramount Pictures Corp. The 5 October 1928 and 5 November 1928 issues credited Paul Bern as producer and Charles Reisner as director. Reisner was reputed to be the “the first ‘gag-man’ in the motion picture industry.” A news item in the 10 October 1928 Variety claimed that all eleven members of the Quillan family would be featured in the production, although only six were identified in available sources. Also joining the cast was character actress Jane Keckley, as stated in the 15 October 1928 New York Daily News.
       The start of principal photography at Pathé Studios in Culver City, CA, was reported in the 20 October 1928 Motion Picture News. An article in the 4 November 1928 Los Angeles Times listed John, Joseph, Buster, Marie, and Isabelle, and their father, Joseph, Sr., referred to as “Dad Quillan,” as featured members of the Quillan family. All, except ...

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The upcoming production was announced in the 7 July 1928 Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World as a vehicle for the Quillan vaudeville family, featuring juvenile star Eddie Quillan. George Dromgold and Sanford Hewitt were credited with the original story, and Virginia Bradford was mentioned as a prospective cast member in the 22 July 1928 New York Times. The 18 August 1928 Motion Picture News listed the film as one of eight Pathé features to be released with sound accompaniment. Nine days later, the 27 August 1928 Exhibitors Daily Review reported that Pathé replaced Dromgold and Hewitt with writer F. Hugh Herbert, who was on loan from Paramount Pictures Corp. The 5 October 1928 and 5 November 1928 issues credited Paul Bern as producer and Charles Reisner as director. Reisner was reputed to be the “the first ‘gag-man’ in the motion picture industry.” A news item in the 10 October 1928 Variety claimed that all eleven members of the Quillan family would be featured in the production, although only six were identified in available sources. Also joining the cast was character actress Jane Keckley, as stated in the 15 October 1928 New York Daily News.
       The start of principal photography at Pathé Studios in Culver City, CA, was reported in the 20 October 1928 Motion Picture News. An article in the 4 November 1928 Los Angeles Times listed John, Joseph, Buster, Marie, and Isabelle, and their father, Joseph, Sr., referred to as “Dad Quillan,” as featured members of the Quillan family. All, except for six-year-old Isabelle, played at least two musical instruments and were expected to perform in the picture. The 22 November 1928 Exhibitors Daily Review noted the casting of Mike Donlin, a professional baseball player, and Robert Perry, a professional boxer. Tom Gibson was credited with writing the film’s dialogue, although various other sources have attributed it to John Krafft. The 2 December 1928 [Salt Lake City, UT] Telegram claimed that a “portable schoolroom” was available at the studio for the four youngest Quillans, Marie, Buster, Joe, and Isabelle. However, the 9 December 1928 [Washington, DC] Evening Star stated that they were tutored in a converted dressing room by Mary Geddes.
       The 1 December 1928 Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World announced the close of production. Three days later, the 4 December 1928 Exhibitors Daily Review stated that cast member Russell Simpson had returned to the studio to work on sound sequences. The 16 March 1929 Exhibitors Herald-World noted that additional sound recording for the picture took place at the former the RKO studio at 134th Street and Park Avenue in New York City.
       The film marked the final screen appearance of veteran actor Theodore Roberts, who died on 14 December 1928 from an attack of influenza following a long illness. An article in the 29 December 1928 Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World revealed that Roberts lived to see and hear his only performance in a talking picture.
       As noted in the 2009 biography, Paul Bern: The Life and Famous Death of the MGM Director and Husband of Harlow by E. J. Fleming, Noisy Neighbors premiered on 27 January 1929, followed by a general release on 17 February 1929. The 2 February 1929 Harrison’s Reports advised exhibitors that they were not obligated to accept the picture, as the original story by Drumgold and Sandford had been replaced. A review in the 24 July 1929 Variety stated that the dialogue sequences comprised only five percent of the film.
       According to the International Federation of Film Archives (FIAF) Treasures from the Film Archives database, this film is extant.

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Evening Star [Washington, DC]
9 Dec 1928
p. 77
Exhibitors Daily Review
27 Aug 1928
p. 4
Exhibitors Daily Review
5 Oct 1928
p. 4
Exhibitors Daily Review
5 Nov 1928
p. 4
Exhibitors Daily Review
22 Nov 1928
p. 4
Exhibitors Daily Review
29 Dec 1928
p. 10
Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World
7 Jul 1928
p. 35
Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World
20 Oct 1928
p. 41
Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World
17 Nov 1928
p. 45
Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World
1 Dec 1928
p. 36
Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World
22 Dec 1928
p. 24
Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World
19 Jan 1929
p. 20
Exhibitors Herald-World
16 Mar 1929
p. 38
Film Daily
17 Feb 1929
---
Harrison's Reports
2 Feb 1929
p. 20
Los Angeles Times
4 Nov 1928
p. 55
Motion Picture News
18 Aug 1928
p. 533
Motion Picture News
20 Oct 1928
p. 1210-A
Motion Picture News
24 Nov 1928
p. 1594
Motion Picture News
1 Dec 1928
p. 1693
Napa Valley Register [Napa, CA]
15 Dec 1928
p. 4
New York Daily News
15 Oct 1928
p. 233
New York Times
22 Jul 1928
p. 92
Salt Lake Telegram [Salt Lake City, UT]
2 Dec 1928
p. 15
Variety
10 Oct 1928
p. 4
Variety
26 Dec 1928
p. 49
Variety
24 Jul 1929
p. 39
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Charles Reisner
Dir
Asst dir
WRITERS
Scott Darling
Adpt
Scott Darling
Cont
Orig story
John Krafft
Dial
John Krafft
Titles
PHOTOGRAPHY
1st cam
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
DETAILS
Release Date:
27 February 1929
Premiere Information:
premiere: 27 Jan 1929
Production Date:
Oct--Nov 1928
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Pathé Exchange, Inc.
21 January 1929
LP42
Physical Properties:
Silent with sound sequences
Talking seq by RCA Photophone
Black and White
Sound, also silent
Also si; 6 reels, 5,735 ft.
Duration(in mins):
74
Length(in feet):
5,735
Length(in reels):
6
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

A family of down-and-out vaudevillians discover that they are the last of the Van Revels, heirs to a Southern plantation and a blood feud with the Carstairs family that began 60 years earlier over a game of croquet. After Eddie falls in love with the neighbors’ daughter, a mountaineer branch of the Carstairs clan resumes the feud with the intent of annihilating the Van ...

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A family of down-and-out vaudevillians discover that they are the last of the Van Revels, heirs to a Southern plantation and a blood feud with the Carstairs family that began 60 years earlier over a game of croquet. After Eddie falls in love with the neighbors’ daughter, a mountaineer branch of the Carstairs clan resumes the feud with the intent of annihilating the Van Revels.

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GENRE
Genre:


Subject

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.