Our Blushing Brides (1930)

88 mins | Melodrama | August 1930

Director:

Harry Beaumont

Cinematographer:

Merritt Gerstad

Production Designer:

Cedric Gibbons

Production Company:

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
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HISTORY

The movie theater "Jerry March" enters near the end of the picture was showing the 1930 M-G-M production, Let Us Be Gay, starring Norma Shearer and Rod La Rocque (see entry). Modern sources add the following actors to the cast: Oscar Apfel, Ernie Alexander, Ann Dvorak, David Mir, Jacques Lory, Leo White, Maude Turner Gordon, Sherry Hall and Broderick O'Farrell.
       Our Blushing Brides was the third of three M-G-M films released between 1928 and 1930 that starred Crawford, used many of the same cast members and depicted similarly themed stories about three young women on the brink of adulthood. The other two films were Our Dancing Daughters, 1928 and Our Modern Maidens, 1929 (see ... More Less

The movie theater "Jerry March" enters near the end of the picture was showing the 1930 M-G-M production, Let Us Be Gay, starring Norma Shearer and Rod La Rocque (see entry). Modern sources add the following actors to the cast: Oscar Apfel, Ernie Alexander, Ann Dvorak, David Mir, Jacques Lory, Leo White, Maude Turner Gordon, Sherry Hall and Broderick O'Farrell.
       Our Blushing Brides was the third of three M-G-M films released between 1928 and 1930 that starred Crawford, used many of the same cast members and depicted similarly themed stories about three young women on the brink of adulthood. The other two films were Our Dancing Daughters, 1928 and Our Modern Maidens, 1929 (see entries). More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Exhibitors Herald-World
9 Aug 1930
p. 33.
Film Daily
3 Aug 1930
p. 10.
Life
22 Aug 1930
p. 19.
New York Times
2 Aug 1930
p. 1.
New York Times
17 Aug 1930
p. 3.
New Yorker
9 Aug 1930
p. 56.
Variety
6 Aug 1930
p. 21.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Harry Beaumont Production
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
WRITERS
Dial and cont
Dial and cont
Addl dial
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Film ed
COSTUMES
Gowns
SOUND
Rec dir
Rec eng
DETAILS
Release Date:
August 1930
Premiere Information:
New York opening: week of 1 August 1930
Copyright Claimant:
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Distributing Corp.
Copyright Date:
7 July 1930
Copyright Number:
LP1439
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
88
Length(in feet):
9,138
Length(in reels):
11
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

In New York, three young women, all of whom are employed at Manhattan’s fashionable Jardine’s Department Store, struggle to make ends meet by sharing an apartment in the Bronx. One of the roommates, Francine “Franky” Daniels, who longs to live in luxury, works in the bedding department. When a seemingly wealthy customer, Martin W. Sanderson, asks her for a date, she becomes hopeful of a richer life and plainly tells her roommates that love is not important to her. Also weary of the drudgery of work, is Connie Blair, who works in the perfume department and is in love with David, one of the Jardine heirs. Believing that she would love him regardless of his economic status, Connie is considering Davy’s wish that he set her up in an apartment without definite plans for marriage. Geraldine “Jerry” March, the third roommate, who models for the department store, warns the others to be more wary of the men they choose. Although the older Jardine son, Tony, has caught Jerry's eye, she has observed that men often pursue women deceitfully for sex rather than love, but hopes that Tony is different. When the Jardines decide to sell the line of couturier Monsieur Pantoise, they host an elaborate fashion show at their country estate. Jerry, to whom Tony has become attracted, is one of the models hired for the event. After the show, Tony invites Jerry to walk with him in the garden and takes her to his special retreat, a studio built in the limbs of a great tree. Jerry is flattered to be given this special attention, but when Tony turns down the lights and talks ... +


In New York, three young women, all of whom are employed at Manhattan’s fashionable Jardine’s Department Store, struggle to make ends meet by sharing an apartment in the Bronx. One of the roommates, Francine “Franky” Daniels, who longs to live in luxury, works in the bedding department. When a seemingly wealthy customer, Martin W. Sanderson, asks her for a date, she becomes hopeful of a richer life and plainly tells her roommates that love is not important to her. Also weary of the drudgery of work, is Connie Blair, who works in the perfume department and is in love with David, one of the Jardine heirs. Believing that she would love him regardless of his economic status, Connie is considering Davy’s wish that he set her up in an apartment without definite plans for marriage. Geraldine “Jerry” March, the third roommate, who models for the department store, warns the others to be more wary of the men they choose. Although the older Jardine son, Tony, has caught Jerry's eye, she has observed that men often pursue women deceitfully for sex rather than love, but hopes that Tony is different. When the Jardines decide to sell the line of couturier Monsieur Pantoise, they host an elaborate fashion show at their country estate. Jerry, to whom Tony has become attracted, is one of the models hired for the event. After the show, Tony invites Jerry to walk with him in the garden and takes her to his special retreat, a studio built in the limbs of a great tree. Jerry is flattered to be given this special attention, but when Tony turns down the lights and talks of losing inhibition, she reproaches him, then leaves. Despite her eloquent refusal, Tony expects that she will have a change of heart “the next time.” Saddened that Tony is as shallow as other men, Jerry returns home and there learns that Connie, believing that a wedding is imminent, has agreed to let Davy "keep" her. Arguing that there are more important things than not having to work, Jerry urges her to change her mind, but to no avail. Franky returns from a date drunk and, unaware that Marty had earlier that day tried to flirt with Jerry, announces that she and he have married. In the weeks that follow, Jerry, now living alone, cuts expenses by moving into a boardinghouse, where the landlady, Mrs. Hinkle, is offended when Jerry declines dates from an interested boarder. Jerry also avoids Tony, but one day he walks into the changing room, where she is alone and half dressed, and again asks her out, admitting that he is used to getting what he wants. Refusing him again, she accuses him of being childish. One day, after being out of touch, Franky comes to visit Jerry and urges her to allow a man to make her life easier. Although she admits that her husband is rarely home, Franky tells Jerry about the things Marty has bought her. As they are talking, a detective enters Jerry’s room and rudely claims that Marty is a womanizer and the head of ring of department store thieves. Although he guesses that Franky is “dumb” but innocent, he takes her to the police station where Marty is being held. Disturbed, Jerry takes a walk, eventually entering a movie house. In the seat in front of her she sees Davy with Evelyn Woodforth, a socialite who has been pursuing him and to whom, Jerry discovers, he has become engaged. Jerry then proceeds to Connie’s apartment to warn her, and is followed soon after by Davy, who has come to break up with Connie. Later, Jerry moves the shocked and depressed Connie into the boardinghouse with her and, while a sadder but wiser Franky moves back to Ohio to live with her parents. One day, Tony tells Jerry that he has developed a conscience and asks for another chance, but she refuses to believe him. Jerry has arranged to go with Connie on a car ride with Joe, a fellow employee whom she frequently has turned down in the past. However, Connie learns that Davy and Evelyn’s wedding will be held that day and that the event will be broadcast on the radio. Jerry wants Connie to join her and Joe Munsey, a friend from the store, on a ride in his new car, but Connie declines, claiming she is tired. After Jerry leaves, she turns on the radio and as the announcer describes the gowns of the wedding party, she goes into the bathroom and takes poison. A short time later, when Jerry returns and finds Connie listless on the bathroom floor, she goes for a doctor, who doubts that he can save Connie. After racing to the Jardine estate, she begs Davy to leave the reception and go to Connie, but Davy, although sorry, feels that he cannot. Jerry accuses both brothers, as well as other men, of lying to get what they want from women and feeling free, because of the difference in class, to cast them aside. Tony, who has listened and now understands why Jerry has chosen self-preservation rather than giving into him, insists that Davy accompany him and Jerry back to her apartment. There, Davy takes the dying Connie into his arms and tells her he is back and will not leave, allowing Connie to die feeling happy. Months later, Jerry and Tony are engaged. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.