Paradise Island (1930)

69 mins | Musical | 7 July 1930

Full page view
HISTORY

Richard Thorpe was initially attached to direct this picture, as announced in the 29 January 1930 Variety. Although a 1 February 1930 Motion Picture News item stated that the story was written by A. P. Younger, later sources credited M. B. Deering.
       On 21 May 1930, a news item in Exhibitors Daily Review and Motion Pictures Today announced that principal photography had been completed under the direction of Bert Glennon. In addition to filming at Tiffany Productions, Inc.’s studio in Hollywood, CA, some location shooting took place at sea, according to a 31 May 1930 Exhibitors Hearld-World brief. Director of photography Max Dupont captured some scenes aboard a ship by attaching the camera to the ship’s bow, and although a groundswell caused the equipment to be soaked, the film was salvaged.
       Paradise Island opened on 7 July 1930 to mixed reception from critics. A review in the 5 July 1930 Motion Picture News deemed the picture “average” but stated that “characters bursting into song at unexpected moments add a certain element of surprise.”
       This film is extant and widely available. ...

More Less

Richard Thorpe was initially attached to direct this picture, as announced in the 29 January 1930 Variety. Although a 1 February 1930 Motion Picture News item stated that the story was written by A. P. Younger, later sources credited M. B. Deering.
       On 21 May 1930, a news item in Exhibitors Daily Review and Motion Pictures Today announced that principal photography had been completed under the direction of Bert Glennon. In addition to filming at Tiffany Productions, Inc.’s studio in Hollywood, CA, some location shooting took place at sea, according to a 31 May 1930 Exhibitors Hearld-World brief. Director of photography Max Dupont captured some scenes aboard a ship by attaching the camera to the ship’s bow, and although a groundswell caused the equipment to be soaked, the film was salvaged.
       Paradise Island opened on 7 July 1930 to mixed reception from critics. A review in the 5 July 1930 Motion Picture News deemed the picture “average” but stated that “characters bursting into song at unexpected moments add a certain element of surprise.”
       This film is extant and widely available.

Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Exhibitors Daily Review and Motion Pictures Today
21 May 1930
p. 6
Exhibitors Herald-World
10 May 1930
p. 12
Exhibitors Herald-World
31 May 1930
p. 118
Film Daily
20 Jul 1930
---
Harrison's Reports
5 Jul 1930
---
Harrison's Reports
19 Jul 1930
p. 114
Motion Picture News
1 Feb 1930
p. 27
Motion Picture News
31 May 1930
p. 121
Motion Picture News
5 Jul 1930
p. 41
Record [Hackensack, NJ]
9 Jul 1930
p. 19
Variety
29 Jan 1930
p. 32
Variety
13 Aug 1930
p. 31
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
WRITERS
Monte Katterjohn
Scr
M. B. Deering
Story
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
SOUND
Rec eng
SOURCES
SONGS
"I've Got a Girl in Every Port," "Drinking Song," "Lazy Breezes" and "Just Another Dream," words by Val Burton, music by Will Jason.
SONGWRITER/COMPOSER
DETAILS
Release Date:
7 July 1930
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 8 Aug 1930
Production Date:
ended May 1930
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Tiffany Productions, Inc.
6 July 1930
LP1407
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Photophone
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
69
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Ellen Bradford arrives on a South Sea island to marry Roy Armstrong but finds that he has gone heavily into debt through gambling with Lutze, owner of the local saloon and gambling hall. Realizing her predicament, Lutze helps her, hoping she will eventually fall in love with him; but Thorne and Beauty, two carefree sailors, make an appearance and win back Armstrong's notes from Lutze. Thorne captures the affections of ...

More Less

Ellen Bradford arrives on a South Sea island to marry Roy Armstrong but finds that he has gone heavily into debt through gambling with Lutze, owner of the local saloon and gambling hall. Realizing her predicament, Lutze helps her, hoping she will eventually fall in love with him; but Thorne and Beauty, two carefree sailors, make an appearance and win back Armstrong's notes from Lutze. Thorne captures the affections of Ellen.

Less

GENRE
Genre:


Subject

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

Life of an American Fireman

The Edison catalog summary is as follows: "It would be difficult for the exhibitor to conceive the amount of work involved and the number of rehearsals necessary to produce ... >>

Psycho

Actor Vaughn Taylor's surname is misspelled "Tayler" in the onscreen credits. Several Jun and Jul 1959 HR news items erroneously refer to the film as Psyche. ... >>

Singin' in the Rain

According to a 5 Feb 1951 HR news item, Carleton Carpenter was to co-star in the film with Gene Kelly and Debbie Reynolds, and a 19 Mar ... >>

Gone with the Wind

[ Note from the Editors : the following information is based on contemporary news items, feature articles, reviews, interviews, memoranda and corporate records. Information obtained from modern sources ... >>

The Maltese Falcon

The working titles of this film were All Women , A Woman of the World and Dangerous Female . In the onscreen credits of ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.