Director:

Victor Fleming

Writer:

Jules Furthman

Cinematographer:

L. W. O'Connell

Editor:

Harold Schuster

Production Company:

Fox Film Corp.
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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
9 Nov 1930
---
New York Times
8 Nov 1930
p. 21
Variety
12 Nov 1930
p. 32
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
PHOTOGRAPHY
L. William O'Connell
Dir of photog
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Settings
COSTUMES
SOUND
Arthur L. von Kirbach
Sd eng
PRODUCTION MISC
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Le Renégat by André Armandy (Paris, 1929).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
SONGS
"I Got What I Wanted," words and music by Cliff Friend and Jimmy Monaco.
SONGWRITER/COMPOSER
DETAILS
Release Date:
26 October 1930
Production Date:

Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Fox Film Corp.
3 October 1930
LP1648
Physical Properties:
Sound
Movietone
Black and White
Length(in feet):
8,400
Length(in reels):
11
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

At Fort Amalfa, outpost of the Foreign Legion in Morocco, four rebellious legionnaires are jailed: Deucalion, a French officer betrayed by Eleanore, a spy; Machwurth, a German; Biloxi, an American; and Vologuine, a Russian. They escape and join the defense of a nearby post, where their bravery wins them military honors. To avenge himself, Deucalion attempts to strangle Eleanore, but native police interfere; thinking they have caused the death of a policeman, all but Biloxi desert. Deucalion becomes military leader of an Arab tribe, kidnaps Eleanore, and has her treated as a servant. Eleanore plans revenge by winning the favor of the Arab ruler; meanwhile, Machwurth and Biloxi, on a gunrunning expedition, are attacked by legionnaires, but they are saved by the Arabs. Deucalion enters the fort under a truce, but his former captain refuses to surrender; realizing he is a despised renegade, Deucalion gives his life to save the legionnaires when his own band attacks the ...

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At Fort Amalfa, outpost of the Foreign Legion in Morocco, four rebellious legionnaires are jailed: Deucalion, a French officer betrayed by Eleanore, a spy; Machwurth, a German; Biloxi, an American; and Vologuine, a Russian. They escape and join the defense of a nearby post, where their bravery wins them military honors. To avenge himself, Deucalion attempts to strangle Eleanore, but native police interfere; thinking they have caused the death of a policeman, all but Biloxi desert. Deucalion becomes military leader of an Arab tribe, kidnaps Eleanore, and has her treated as a servant. Eleanore plans revenge by winning the favor of the Arab ruler; meanwhile, Machwurth and Biloxi, on a gunrunning expedition, are attacked by legionnaires, but they are saved by the Arabs. Deucalion enters the fort under a truce, but his former captain refuses to surrender; realizing he is a despised renegade, Deucalion gives his life to save the legionnaires when his own band attacks the fort.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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