The Road to Mandalay (1926)

Melodrama | 28 June 1926

Director:

Tod Browning

Cinematographer:

Merritt Gerstad

Editor:

Errol Taggart

Production Designers:

Cedric Gibbons, A. Arnold Gillespie

Production Company:

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
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HISTORY

The title is taken from the Rudyard Kipling poem, “Mandalay.”
       A news item in the 17 April 1926 Exhibitors Herald announced that filming had commenced. Lead actor Lon Chaney, known for using special makeup effects, achieved the look of a cataract in one of his eyes through the application of a “collodion preparation” which was inserted under his eyelid, according to the 6 June 1926 [Fresno, CA] Fresno Morning Republican. The chemical was said to be painful and Chaney could not endure it in his eye for more than an hour at a time.
       General release was scheduled to take place on 28 June 1926. Earlier openings occurred in Los Angeles, CA, on 25 June 1926, and 27 June 1926 in New York City. An unflattering review in the 29 June 1926 New York Times lamented that Chaney’s makeup was to blame for “much of his posing.”
       The August 1926 Picture-Play claimed that a pair of twins, Margy Angus and Mary Angus, appeared in bit roles.
       According to the Library of Congress American Silent Feature Film Survival Database, an incomplete version of this film is extant. ...

More Less

The title is taken from the Rudyard Kipling poem, “Mandalay.”
       A news item in the 17 April 1926 Exhibitors Herald announced that filming had commenced. Lead actor Lon Chaney, known for using special makeup effects, achieved the look of a cataract in one of his eyes through the application of a “collodion preparation” which was inserted under his eyelid, according to the 6 June 1926 [Fresno, CA] Fresno Morning Republican. The chemical was said to be painful and Chaney could not endure it in his eye for more than an hour at a time.
       General release was scheduled to take place on 28 June 1926. Earlier openings occurred in Los Angeles, CA, on 25 June 1926, and 27 June 1926 in New York City. An unflattering review in the 29 June 1926 New York Times lamented that Chaney’s makeup was to blame for “much of his posing.”
       The August 1926 Picture-Play claimed that a pair of twins, Margy Angus and Mary Angus, appeared in bit roles.
       According to the Library of Congress American Silent Feature Film Survival Database, an incomplete version of this film is extant.

Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Dayton Herald [Dayton, OH]
22 Jun 1926
p. 11
Exhibitors Herald
17 Apr 1926
p. 108
Film Daily
29 Mar 1926
---
Film Daily
11 Jul 1926
---
Fresno Morning Republican [Fresno, CA]
6 Jun 1926
p. 36
Los Angeles Evening Post-Record
23 Jun 1926
p. 11
Los Angeles Times
25 Jun 1926
Section A, p. 9
Motion Picture
Oct 1926
---
Motion Picture News
8 May 1926
---
Motion Picture News
21 Aug 1926
p. 704
New York Times
29 Jun 1926
p. 21
Picture-Play
Aug 1926
p. 54
Variety
5 May 1926
p. 31
Variety
30 Jun 1926
p. 12
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
WRITERS
Elliott Clawson
Scen
Story
Herman Mankiewicz
Story
Joe Farnham
Titles
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Arnold Gillespie
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
DETAILS
Release Date:
28 June 1926
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 25 Jun 1926; New York opening: 27 Jun 1926
Production Date:
ca. Apr--May 1926
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
12 July 1926
LP22907
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
6,562
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Joe, a former sea captain whose wife died during the birth of their child at sea, is now a pockmarked, disreputable divekeeper in Singapore where he indulges in shady operations with Herrick, known as The Admiral. They ship for Mandalay, where Joe's daughter lives with a priest, Father James, and tends a curio shop, unaware that her father regularly sends money to Father James for her support. Although his daughter clearly finds him abhorrent, Joe determines to take her away until he learns that The Admiral has fallen in love with her and plans to marry her. He persuades Father James (actually his brother) not to perform the ceremony, and The Admiral is shanghaied by Joe's men. The girl, suspecting Joe, goes to his brothel in Singapore and is about to be assaulted by Charlie, a lecherous Chinaman, when Joe intervenes and is stabbed. The Admiral comes to her rescue and escapes with her on a ...

More Less

Joe, a former sea captain whose wife died during the birth of their child at sea, is now a pockmarked, disreputable divekeeper in Singapore where he indulges in shady operations with Herrick, known as The Admiral. They ship for Mandalay, where Joe's daughter lives with a priest, Father James, and tends a curio shop, unaware that her father regularly sends money to Father James for her support. Although his daughter clearly finds him abhorrent, Joe determines to take her away until he learns that The Admiral has fallen in love with her and plans to marry her. He persuades Father James (actually his brother) not to perform the ceremony, and The Admiral is shanghaied by Joe's men. The girl, suspecting Joe, goes to his brothel in Singapore and is about to be assaulted by Charlie, a lecherous Chinaman, when Joe intervenes and is stabbed. The Admiral comes to her rescue and escapes with her on a boat.

Less

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.