Rogue of the Rio Grande (1930)

55 mins | Western | 15 October 1930

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HISTORY

On 10 September 1930, Exhibitors Daily Review announced that filming had ended at the Sono-Art Studios in Hollywood, CA. According to an article in the 10 October 1930 Exhibitors Daily Review, Rogue of the Rio Grande was one of twenty pictures set to be released by Sono Art-World Wide Productions, Inc. in 1930 and 1931. The picture opened to mixed reviews on 15 October 1930. While the 6 December 1930 Motion Picture News deemed it “a fast-moving and exciting narrative” and a “refreshing change from the accepted pattern,” the 7 December 1930 Film Daily stated, “The entire production is unconvincing and lacking any real dramatic punch for a climax.” The 3 January 1931 Harrison’s Reports noted that the film included “a few dance numbers and several songs.”
       This picture is extant. ...

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On 10 September 1930, Exhibitors Daily Review announced that filming had ended at the Sono-Art Studios in Hollywood, CA. According to an article in the 10 October 1930 Exhibitors Daily Review, Rogue of the Rio Grande was one of twenty pictures set to be released by Sono Art-World Wide Productions, Inc. in 1930 and 1931. The picture opened to mixed reviews on 15 October 1930. While the 6 December 1930 Motion Picture News deemed it “a fast-moving and exciting narrative” and a “refreshing change from the accepted pattern,” the 7 December 1930 Film Daily stated, “The entire production is unconvincing and lacking any real dramatic punch for a climax.” The 3 January 1931 Harrison’s Reports noted that the film included “a few dance numbers and several songs.”
       This picture is extant.

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Exhibitors Daily Review and Motion Pictures Today
10 Sep 1930
p. 6
Exhibitors Daily Review and Motion Pictures Today
10 Oct 1930
p. 6
Film Daily
7 Dec 1930
p. 10
Harrison's Reports
3 Jan 1931
---
Motion Picture News
27 Sep 1930
p. 33
Motion Picture News
6 Dec 1930
p. 120
Variety
17 Dec 1930
p. 63
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
Spencer Gordon Bennett
Dir
PRODUCERS
WRITER
Scr and dial
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
MUSIC
Music and lyrics
Music and lyrics
SOUND
Rec eng
SOURCES
SONGS
"Argentine Moon," "Carmita," "Corazón" and "Song of the Bandoleros," words and music by Herbert Meyers and Oliver Drake, Spanish lyrics by José Bohr.
SONGWRITER/COMPOSER
DETAILS
Release Date:
15 October 1930
Production Date:
ended early Sep 1930
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Sono Art-World Wide Productions, Inc.
7 November 1930
LP1712
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
55
Length(in feet):
7,000
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

El Malo, a notorious Mexican bandit, pays a surprise visit to the office of Seth Landport, of the Sierra Blanca bank, "borrows" 2,000 pesos, and departs. Landport reports the theft to Sheriff Tex Rankin, who posts a reward for the bandit's capture. Later, El Malo and his aide, Pedro, visit the local cantina, where the bandit resumes his acquaintance with Carmita, a dancer, and Pedro renews his friendship with Dolores. As Landport's description of him is inaccurate, El Malo discusses the bandit's arrest with the sheriff, who has never seen him previously, and incurs the enmity of Carmita's dance partner, who learns his true identity. El Malo witnesses a stage robbery instigated by Landport, and declares him to be the bandit in the presence of the sheriff. Carmita's dance partner seeks revenge, but El Malo sees his reflection in a mirror and shoots a hanging planter, which knocks the dancer into a potted cactus. Then, El Malo reveals his identity and is about to be taken into custody when Carmita grabs a pistol, shoots out the lights and escapes with El Malo into the night as the sheriff and his posse ride in ...

More Less

El Malo, a notorious Mexican bandit, pays a surprise visit to the office of Seth Landport, of the Sierra Blanca bank, "borrows" 2,000 pesos, and departs. Landport reports the theft to Sheriff Tex Rankin, who posts a reward for the bandit's capture. Later, El Malo and his aide, Pedro, visit the local cantina, where the bandit resumes his acquaintance with Carmita, a dancer, and Pedro renews his friendship with Dolores. As Landport's description of him is inaccurate, El Malo discusses the bandit's arrest with the sheriff, who has never seen him previously, and incurs the enmity of Carmita's dance partner, who learns his true identity. El Malo witnesses a stage robbery instigated by Landport, and declares him to be the bandit in the presence of the sheriff. Carmita's dance partner seeks revenge, but El Malo sees his reflection in a mirror and shoots a hanging planter, which knocks the dancer into a potted cactus. Then, El Malo reveals his identity and is about to be taken into custody when Carmita grabs a pistol, shoots out the lights and escapes with El Malo into the night as the sheriff and his posse ride in pursuit.

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GENRE
Genre:


Subject

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.