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HISTORY

The 15 Apr 1926 FD announced that Rubber Tires would be one of forty-one pictures to be released by Cecil B. De Mille’s Producers Distributing Corp. (P.D.C.) for the 1926–1927 season. P.D.C. would also handle production on the picture.
       The 24 Apr 1926 Moving Picture World indicated that the story was written by William Slavens McNutt and Frank Woods, but Slavens did not receive credit for his contribution.
       The 3 Jul 1926 Motion Picture News noted an expected Dec 1926 release date.
       On 31 Aug 1926, FD reported Alan Hale as the film’s director, and the 8 Sep 1926 Var announced that Bessie Love and Rod La Rocque would co-star. However, La Rocque was replaced by Harrison Ford.
       According to the 9 Sep 1926 FD, Hale and Frank Condon were currently working on the treatment. The 18 Sep 1926 Moving Picture World stated that principal photography would soon begin.
       The 20 Oct 1926 FD announced that location filming was underway in Santa Cruz, CA. From there the crew would continue shooting the “automobile camp” story along several thousand miles, as Rubber Tires was “made up principally of exteriors,” according to the 6 Nov 1926 Motion Picture News. The 18 Dec 1926 Moving Picture World confirmed “there are no studio-made scenes in the production.” The “hundreds” of background actors used for the picture were newcomers to motion pictures, enlisted by Hale from “tourists camps” along the highways.
       Production was delayed for one day after ten-year-old actor, Junior Coghlan, ate four unripe apples from a nearby ... More Less

The 15 Apr 1926 FD announced that Rubber Tires would be one of forty-one pictures to be released by Cecil B. De Mille’s Producers Distributing Corp. (P.D.C.) for the 1926–1927 season. P.D.C. would also handle production on the picture.
       The 24 Apr 1926 Moving Picture World indicated that the story was written by William Slavens McNutt and Frank Woods, but Slavens did not receive credit for his contribution.
       The 3 Jul 1926 Motion Picture News noted an expected Dec 1926 release date.
       On 31 Aug 1926, FD reported Alan Hale as the film’s director, and the 8 Sep 1926 Var announced that Bessie Love and Rod La Rocque would co-star. However, La Rocque was replaced by Harrison Ford.
       According to the 9 Sep 1926 FD, Hale and Frank Condon were currently working on the treatment. The 18 Sep 1926 Moving Picture World stated that principal photography would soon begin.
       The 20 Oct 1926 FD announced that location filming was underway in Santa Cruz, CA. From there the crew would continue shooting the “automobile camp” story along several thousand miles, as Rubber Tires was “made up principally of exteriors,” according to the 6 Nov 1926 Motion Picture News. The 18 Dec 1926 Moving Picture World confirmed “there are no studio-made scenes in the production.” The “hundreds” of background actors used for the picture were newcomers to motion pictures, enlisted by Hale from “tourists camps” along the highways.
       Production was delayed for one day after ten-year-old actor, Junior Coghlan, ate four unripe apples from a nearby orchard during filming and became ill, as reported in the 4 Nov 1926 FD and the 20 Nov 1926 Motion Picture News.
       On 11 Dec 1926, Moving Picture World noted that at De Mille Studios in Culver City, CA, “activity also centers around Rubber Tires,” but it is unclear if any filming actually occurred on stages there. Principal photography was anticipated to be completed that week.
       According to the 7 Jan 1927 Motion Picture News, a Feb 1927 release date was expected.
       Reviews were mixed. Both the 9 Mar 1927 Var and the 20 Mar 1927 FD reviews complained about the illogical plot, but FD deemed it a worthy comedy. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Chicago Tribune
9 Feb 1927
p. 29.
Film Daily
15 Apr 1926
p. 1, 3.
Film Daily
31 Aug 1926
p. 3.
Film Daily
9 Sep 1926
p. 10.
Film Daily
20 Oct 1926
p. 4.
Film Daily
4 Nov 1926
p. 2.
Film Daily
20 Mar 1927
p. 7.
Motion Picture News
3 Jul 1926
p. 39.
Motion Picture News
6 Nov 1926
p. 1758e.
Motion Picture News
20 Nov 1926
p. 1931.
Motion Picture News
7 Jan 1927
p. 47.
Moving Picture World
24 Apr 1926
p. 589.
Moving Picture World
18 Sep 1926
p. 155.
Moving Picture World
11 Dec 1926
p. 412.
Moving Picture World
18 Dec 1926
p. 499.
New York Times
9 Mar 1927
p. 29.
Variety
8 Sep 1926
p. 21.
Variety
9 Mar 1927
pp. 16-17.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
An Alan Hale Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
Dir
PRODUCERS
WRITERS
Story
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
DETAILS
Release Date:
7 February 1927
Production Date:
October--mid December 1926
Copyright Claimant:
Cinema Corp. of America
Copyright Date:
4 February 1927
Copyright Number:
LP23632
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
6,303
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

Deciding to move to California, Mary Ellen Stack sells the family household goods, buys a dilapidated car, and with her mother, father, and small brother sets out for the West, followed by her sweetheart, Bill. At an auto camp they meet Adolph Messer, a tourist who is attracted to Mary Ellen. Meanwhile, a wealthy automobile manufacturer offers a reward for a car identical to the one owned by the Stacks. Unaware that her father has traded cars with a Mexican, Mary Ellen is victimized by the dealer who wants to cash in on the reward. A wild and humorous race is climaxed by an automobile pile-up, but the Stacks collect the reward and settle down on their California farm, while Bill, having won Mary Ellen, is the happy proprietor of a gas ... +


Deciding to move to California, Mary Ellen Stack sells the family household goods, buys a dilapidated car, and with her mother, father, and small brother sets out for the West, followed by her sweetheart, Bill. At an auto camp they meet Adolph Messer, a tourist who is attracted to Mary Ellen. Meanwhile, a wealthy automobile manufacturer offers a reward for a car identical to the one owned by the Stacks. Unaware that her father has traded cars with a Mexican, Mary Ellen is victimized by the dealer who wants to cash in on the reward. A wild and humorous race is climaxed by an automobile pile-up, but the Stacks collect the reward and settle down on their California farm, while Bill, having won Mary Ellen, is the happy proprietor of a gas station. +

GENRE
Genre:


Subject

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.