The Sap From Syracuse (1930)

70 mins | Comedy | 26 July 1930

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
27 Jul 1930
---
New York Times
26 Jul 1930
p. 16
Variety
30 Jul 1930
p. 16
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
SOUND
Rec eng
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play So Was Napoleon ( Sap From Syracuse ) by John Wray and Jack O'Donnell, staged by John Hayden (New York 8 Jan 1930).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHORS
SONGS
"How I Wish I Could Sing a Love Song" and "Aw What's the Use?" words by E. Y. Harburg, music by John W. Green; "Capitalize That Thing Called It," words by E. Y. Harburg, music by Vernon Duke.
DETAILS
Release Date:
26 July 1930
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 25 Jul 1930
Production Date:

Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Paramount Publix Corp.
28 July 1930
LP1446
Physical Properties:
Sound
Movietone
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
70
Length(in feet):
6,108
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Littleton Looney, a crane driver and general handyman in Syracuse, is a constant target for local practical jokers. When an unexpected inheritance gives him the chance to travel to Europe, jokesters send word to the ship captain that he is a famous mining engineer, traveling incognito; as a result, he is courted and pursued all over the ship. He meets Ellen Saunders, a mine owner, and two men who are plotting to rob her of her property, and when she seeks his aid, his identity is vouched for by the prominent Senator Powell. Meanwhile, Looney is pursued by two gold diggers, though he is trying to court Ellen. In Europe, a conference of engineers is called to plan a means of transporting machinery to the mine; Looney, learning of a low river bed, suggests damming the stream and using it as a road, an idea hailed by the experts. The plotters are unmasked by Powell, actually the engineer, and Looney wins the ...

More Less

Littleton Looney, a crane driver and general handyman in Syracuse, is a constant target for local practical jokers. When an unexpected inheritance gives him the chance to travel to Europe, jokesters send word to the ship captain that he is a famous mining engineer, traveling incognito; as a result, he is courted and pursued all over the ship. He meets Ellen Saunders, a mine owner, and two men who are plotting to rob her of her property, and when she seeks his aid, his identity is vouched for by the prominent Senator Powell. Meanwhile, Looney is pursued by two gold diggers, though he is trying to court Ellen. In Europe, a conference of engineers is called to plan a means of transporting machinery to the mine; Looney, learning of a low river bed, suggests damming the stream and using it as a road, an idea hailed by the experts. The plotters are unmasked by Powell, actually the engineer, and Looney wins the girl.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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