The Sea Bat (1930)

66 mins | Melodrama | 5 July 1930

Director:

Wesley Ruggles

Cinematographer:

Ira Morgan

Production Designer:

Cedric Gibbons

Production Company:

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
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HISTORY

According to a NYT^ news item on 2 Mar 1930, the film was shot on locations off the coast and near Mazatlán, Mexico. ...

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According to a NYT^ news item on 2 Mar 1930, the film was shot on locations off the coast and near Mazatlán, Mexico.

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
LOCATION
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
10 Aug 1930
---
New York Times
2 Mar 1930
---
Variety
13 Aug 1930
p. 31
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Film ed
SOUND
Rec eng
Rec eng
SOURCES
SONGS
"Lo-Lo," words by Felix E. Feist and Howard Johnson, music by Reggie Montgomery and George Ward.
SONGWRITERS/COMPOSERS
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
5 July 1930
Production Date:

Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Distributing Corp.
7 July 1930
LP1401
Physical Properties:
Sound
Movietone
Black and White
Sound, also silent
Also si.
Duration(in mins):
66
Length(in feet):
6,570
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

At an outpost in the Caribbean, Nina, the daughter of Antone, a local sponge fisherman, is in love with Carl, a diver on one of the schooners. On a hunting expedition, Juan, a jealous rival, fouls the air line; and when a monstrous sea bat appears, Juan leaves Carl to drown. In despair, Nina turns to the voodoo rites of the natives and declares she will marry the man who captures the sea bat. Reverend Sims, actually an escaped convict, arrives on a tramp steamer, converts the girl, and in the process falls in love with her. They decide to elope by motorboat, but Juan, who has recognized Sims, succeeds in capturing him with the aid of a friend. The trio are attacked by the sea bat, and all are drowned but Sims, who returns to the waiting ...

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At an outpost in the Caribbean, Nina, the daughter of Antone, a local sponge fisherman, is in love with Carl, a diver on one of the schooners. On a hunting expedition, Juan, a jealous rival, fouls the air line; and when a monstrous sea bat appears, Juan leaves Carl to drown. In despair, Nina turns to the voodoo rites of the natives and declares she will marry the man who captures the sea bat. Reverend Sims, actually an escaped convict, arrives on a tramp steamer, converts the girl, and in the process falls in love with her. They decide to elope by motorboat, but Juan, who has recognized Sims, succeeds in capturing him with the aid of a friend. The trio are attacked by the sea bat, and all are drowned but Sims, who returns to the waiting Nina.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.