Sherlock Brown (1922)

Comedy-drama | 26 June 1922

Director:

Bayard Veiller

Cinematographer:

Arthur Martinelli

Production Designer:

A. F. Mantz

Production Company:

Metro Pictures Corp.
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HISTORY

Filming was completed at Metro Pictures Corp.’s studio in Hollywood, CA, sometime before late December 1921. An article in the 28 December 1921 Los Angeles Evening Express noted that lead actor Bert Lytell had since embarked on a “transcontinental tour of personal appearances.” Theatrical release was scheduled to take place on 26 June 1922. Prior to that, the film opened in Chicago, IL, the week of 15 June 1922, according to that day’s Chicago Tribune.
       Critical reception was mixed. The 24 July 1922 Los Angeles Times deemed the film funny but forgettable, while a review in the November 1922 Motion Picture Magazine called it “a bright little piece, skillfully put together and marked for its clever sub-titles.”
       The National Film Preservation Board (NFPB) included this picture on its list of Lost U.S. Silent Feature Films as of February 2021. ...

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Filming was completed at Metro Pictures Corp.’s studio in Hollywood, CA, sometime before late December 1921. An article in the 28 December 1921 Los Angeles Evening Express noted that lead actor Bert Lytell had since embarked on a “transcontinental tour of personal appearances.” Theatrical release was scheduled to take place on 26 June 1922. Prior to that, the film opened in Chicago, IL, the week of 15 June 1922, according to that day’s Chicago Tribune.
       Critical reception was mixed. The 24 July 1922 Los Angeles Times deemed the film funny but forgettable, while a review in the November 1922 Motion Picture Magazine called it “a bright little piece, skillfully put together and marked for its clever sub-titles.”
       The National Film Preservation Board (NFPB) included this picture on its list of Lost U.S. Silent Feature Films as of February 2021.

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Chicago Tribune
15 Jun 1922
p. 18
Los Angeles Evening Express
28 Dec 1921
p. 29
Los Angeles Times
24 Jul 1922
Section III, p. 3
Motion Picture Magazine
Nov 1922
p. 119
New-York Tribune
1 Jan 1922
p. 46
Variety
23 Jun 1922
p. 37
DETAILS
Release Date:
26 June 1922
Premiere Information:
Chicago opening: week of 15 Jun 1922; Boston opening: week of 23 Jun 1922
Production Date:
ca. late 1921
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Metro Pictures
21 June 1922
LP17986
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
4,800
Length(in reels):
5
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

William Brown, who wants to become a detective, writes to an agency and receives for $5 a tin badge. At the same time, a secret government formula for explosives is stolen from Lieutenant Musgrave, to whom Brown promises his aid. Meanwhile, Musgrave is hospitalized in delirium and utters the name "Wallace" to his sister, Barbara, who discovers that Wallace has hidden the formula in a flowerpot and follows him to his apartment. There, during a struggle, a book on flying alerts Brown. He accidentally discovers the secret formula, and Barbara escapes with the paper but is sidetracked on her way to a government agent. Following numerous complications and a long chase, Sherlock Brown succeeds in tracking down the conspirators, regaining the formula, and winning the heart of ...

More Less

William Brown, who wants to become a detective, writes to an agency and receives for $5 a tin badge. At the same time, a secret government formula for explosives is stolen from Lieutenant Musgrave, to whom Brown promises his aid. Meanwhile, Musgrave is hospitalized in delirium and utters the name "Wallace" to his sister, Barbara, who discovers that Wallace has hidden the formula in a flowerpot and follows him to his apartment. There, during a struggle, a book on flying alerts Brown. He accidentally discovers the secret formula, and Barbara escapes with the paper but is sidetracked on her way to a government agent. Following numerous complications and a long chase, Sherlock Brown succeeds in tracking down the conspirators, regaining the formula, and winning the heart of Barbara.

Less

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.