Shooting Straight (1930)

72 mins | Melodrama | 20 July 1930

Director:

George Archainbaud

Cinematographer:

Edward Cronjager

Editor:

Otto Ludwig

Production Designer:

Max Rée

Production Company:

RKO Productions, Inc.
Full page view
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
27 Jul 1930
---
New York Times
28 Jul 1930
p. 22
Variety
30 Jul 1930
p. 17
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
PRODUCER
WRITERS
Barney A. Sarecky
Story
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SOUND
Rec eng
DETAILS
Release Date:
20 July 1930
Production Date:

Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
RKO Productions, Inc.
1 June 1930
LP1468
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Photophone
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
72
Length(in feet):
5,800
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

City gambler Larry Sheldon, upon hearing that a pal has been taken for a ride, goes to the hideout of Spot Willis and, to all appearances, wreaks revenge. Sheldon leaves the city with his henchman, Chick, occupying a Pullman section with Mr. Walters, an evangelist; before Sheldon can return Walters' wallet (which Chick has lifted), the train is wrecked. Later, Larry awakes to find himself the guest of the Reverend Powell, who has mistaken him for Walters; he keeps his identity secret, and attracted to Doris, the minister's daughter, he begins to take an interest in the community church and social life. When Doris' brother becomes involved with Martin, a local gambler, Larry covers Martin in a crap game, but Martin, recognizing him, turns him over to the police. After a battle with the police, Larry is subdued, but Martin confesses and reveals that another man is responsible for the murder of Willis. Larry finds happiness with Doris and decides to go ...

More Less

City gambler Larry Sheldon, upon hearing that a pal has been taken for a ride, goes to the hideout of Spot Willis and, to all appearances, wreaks revenge. Sheldon leaves the city with his henchman, Chick, occupying a Pullman section with Mr. Walters, an evangelist; before Sheldon can return Walters' wallet (which Chick has lifted), the train is wrecked. Later, Larry awakes to find himself the guest of the Reverend Powell, who has mistaken him for Walters; he keeps his identity secret, and attracted to Doris, the minister's daughter, he begins to take an interest in the community church and social life. When Doris' brother becomes involved with Martin, a local gambler, Larry covers Martin in a crap game, but Martin, recognizing him, turns him over to the police. After a battle with the police, Larry is subdued, but Martin confesses and reveals that another man is responsible for the murder of Willis. Larry finds happiness with Doris and decides to go straight.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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