Stella Dallas (1925)

Drama | 16 November 1925

Director:

Henry King

Cinematographer:

Arthur Edeson

Editor:

Stuart Heisler

Production Company:

Samuel Goldwyn, Inc.
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HISTORY

According to an Exhibitors Trade Review news item, Louis F. Gottschalk arranged the accompanying musical score for the film. A 5 Sep 1925 Motion Picture News item reported that Flobelle Fairbanks, cousin of Douglas Fairbanks, Jr., would appear in the film as the maid of honor at the wedding of "Laurel Dallas," but her appearance in the released film has not been confirmed.
       The Jul 1925 AmCin reported that Stella Dallas was being filmed at United Studios (Paramount) in Hollywood, CA.
       Voted one of the “Top Best Features” of 1926 by the 1929 Film Daily Year Book, as reported in the 7 Feb 1930 FD.
       Samuel Goldwyn, under his Howard Productions, Inc. banner, produced a second adaption of the popular Olive Higgins Prouty novel in 1937. Also titled Stella Dallas, that film was directed by King Vidor and starred Barbara Stanwyck and John Boles (see ... More Less

According to an Exhibitors Trade Review news item, Louis F. Gottschalk arranged the accompanying musical score for the film. A 5 Sep 1925 Motion Picture News item reported that Flobelle Fairbanks, cousin of Douglas Fairbanks, Jr., would appear in the film as the maid of honor at the wedding of "Laurel Dallas," but her appearance in the released film has not been confirmed.
       The Jul 1925 AmCin reported that Stella Dallas was being filmed at United Studios (Paramount) in Hollywood, CA.
       Voted one of the “Top Best Features” of 1926 by the 1929 Film Daily Year Book, as reported in the 7 Feb 1930 FD.
       Samuel Goldwyn, under his Howard Productions, Inc. banner, produced a second adaption of the popular Olive Higgins Prouty novel in 1937. Also titled Stella Dallas, that film was directed by King Vidor and starred Barbara Stanwyck and John Boles (see entry). More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
American Cinematographer
Jul 1925
p. 24.
Exhibitors Trade Review
3 Sep 1925
p. 66.
Exhibitors Trade Review
21 Sep 1925
p. 19.
Exhibitors Trade Review
21 Nov 1925
p. 27.
Film Daily
22 Nov 1925
p. 6.
Film Daily
7 Feb 1930
p. 8.
Life
10 Dec 1925
p. 24.
Motion Picture News
5 Sep 1925
p. 1141.
Motion Picture News
28 Nov 1925
p. 342, 2570.
New York Times
17 Nov 1925
p. 30.
Photoplay
Dec 1925
p. 46.
Variety
18 Nov 1925
p. 42.
DETAILS
Release Date:
16 November 1925
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 16 November 1925
Copyright Claimant:
Samuel Goldwyn, Inc.
Copyright Date:
24 February 1926
Copyright Number:
LP22421
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
10,157
Length(in reels):
11
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Upon the suicide of his father, socialite Stephen Dallas leaves his opulent home and goes to live in a small town where he marries Stella, a woman far below his social station. The marriage is a failure, and Stephen soon separates from Stella, returning to New York and leaving Stella to care for Laurel, their little girl. Years pass. Laurel grows to young womanhood, and Stella, realizing that she cannot properly provide for her tender, sensitive daughter, agrees at last to divorce Stephen so that he can marry Helen Morrison and thereby provide a good home for Laurel. Laurel at first refuses to leave her mother, but Stella marries a drunkard and Laurel is forced to live with her father. Laurel later marries Richard Grovesnor, a society lad of considerable charm and promise, and Stella, standing in the rain outside, watches the ceremony through a window of the Morrison ... +


Upon the suicide of his father, socialite Stephen Dallas leaves his opulent home and goes to live in a small town where he marries Stella, a woman far below his social station. The marriage is a failure, and Stephen soon separates from Stella, returning to New York and leaving Stella to care for Laurel, their little girl. Years pass. Laurel grows to young womanhood, and Stella, realizing that she cannot properly provide for her tender, sensitive daughter, agrees at last to divorce Stephen so that he can marry Helen Morrison and thereby provide a good home for Laurel. Laurel at first refuses to leave her mother, but Stella marries a drunkard and Laurel is forced to live with her father. Laurel later marries Richard Grovesnor, a society lad of considerable charm and promise, and Stella, standing in the rain outside, watches the ceremony through a window of the Morrison home. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.