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HISTORY

Referring to the picture as Sunny Side Up, the 8 Jun 1929 Hollywood Filmograph announced that production would start immediately at Fox Studios in Los Angeles, CA, under the direction and adaptation of David Butler, and starring Janet Gaynor. The musical, including “story, dialogue and song numbers,” was written by Buddy DeSylva, Lew Brown, and Ray Henderson, who each made their feature film writing debuts with Sunnyside Up. The 26 Jun 1929 Var reported the “record high figure” of $150,000 paid to the writing team by Fox.
       According to the 13 Jul 1929 Hollywood Filmograph, production was underway at Fox Studio’s “Movietone City,” where “hundreds” were reportedly filming opening sequences in the “Yorkville section” of the New York City set, which replicated a “middle class" neighborhood.
       The 15 Jun 1929 Hollywood Filmograph stated that youngster Artye Folz had been cast in the film. Additional child actors, Anna Lou Gazzelle, Adeline Craig, Jackie Searl, and Virginia Wiseman, were listed in the 20 Jul 1929, 10 Aug 1929, and 17 Aug 1929 editions of Hollywood Filmograph, although none were credited in reviews. The 3 Jul 1929 Var item noted that Jack Young was assisting Seymour Felix with dance staging.
       The 21 Aug 1929 Var announced that principal photography was nearing completion, and the crew was “working nights on the big water carnival splash.” Seymour Felix choreographed a number in a “mammoth tank” fitted with a “heavy glass top,” where the dancers would perform ballet as if they were “dancing on water.”
       Sunnyside Up premiered on Broadway at New York City’s Gaiety ... More Less

Referring to the picture as Sunny Side Up, the 8 Jun 1929 Hollywood Filmograph announced that production would start immediately at Fox Studios in Los Angeles, CA, under the direction and adaptation of David Butler, and starring Janet Gaynor. The musical, including “story, dialogue and song numbers,” was written by Buddy DeSylva, Lew Brown, and Ray Henderson, who each made their feature film writing debuts with Sunnyside Up. The 26 Jun 1929 Var reported the “record high figure” of $150,000 paid to the writing team by Fox.
       According to the 13 Jul 1929 Hollywood Filmograph, production was underway at Fox Studio’s “Movietone City,” where “hundreds” were reportedly filming opening sequences in the “Yorkville section” of the New York City set, which replicated a “middle class" neighborhood.
       The 15 Jun 1929 Hollywood Filmograph stated that youngster Artye Folz had been cast in the film. Additional child actors, Anna Lou Gazzelle, Adeline Craig, Jackie Searl, and Virginia Wiseman, were listed in the 20 Jul 1929, 10 Aug 1929, and 17 Aug 1929 editions of Hollywood Filmograph, although none were credited in reviews. The 3 Jul 1929 Var item noted that Jack Young was assisting Seymour Felix with dance staging.
       The 21 Aug 1929 Var announced that principal photography was nearing completion, and the crew was “working nights on the big water carnival splash.” Seymour Felix choreographed a number in a “mammoth tank” fitted with a “heavy glass top,” where the dancers would perform ballet as if they were “dancing on water.”
       Sunnyside Up premiered on Broadway at New York City’s Gaiety Theatre on 3 Oct 1929, according to the 2 Oct 1929 Var.
       The 9 Oct 1929 Var review indicated that Winfield R. Sheehan was the producer, although he was not credited elsewhere. Ticket prices were listed as $5.50, and the picture was deemed “a musical of a high order,” and “hugely entertaining.”
Sunnyside Up was fully restored by The Film Foundation, an organization founded in 1990 by director Martin Scorsese. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
6 Oct 1929
p. 9.
Hollywood Filmograph
8 Jun 1929
p. 28.
Hollywood Filmograph
15 Jun 1929
p. 14.
Hollywood Filmograph
22 Jun 1929
p. 9.
Hollywood Filmograph
29 Jun 1929
p. 27.
Hollywood Filmograph
13 Jul 1929
p. 16.
Hollywood Filmograph
20 Jul 1929
p. 5.
Hollywood Filmograph
10 Aug 1929
p. 24.
Hollywood Filmograph
17 Aug 1929
p. 24.
New York Times
4 Oct 1929
p. 24.
Variety
26 Jun 1929
p. 56.
Variety
3 Jul 1929
p. 64.
Variety
21 Aug 1929
p. 49.
Variety
11 Sep 1929
p. 21.
Variety
2 Oct 1929
p. 11.
Variety
9 Oct 1929
p. 31.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
William Fox Presents
An Original Musical Comedy
David Butler Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
Story, Dial, Words and Mus
Story, Dial, Words and Mus
Story, Dial, Words and Mus
Continuity
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
Photog
ART DIRECTOR
Settings
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Mus dir
Mus dir
SOUND
DANCE
Dances staged by
SOURCES
SONGS
"I'm A Dreamer (Aren't We All?)," "If I Had A Talking Picture of You," "Turn On The Heat," "Sunny Side Up," and "(You've Got Me) Picking Petals Off O' Daisies," words and music by Buddy DeSylva, Lew Brown and Ray Henderson.
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Sunny Side Up
Release Date:
29 December 1929
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 3 October 1929
Copyright Claimant:
Fox Film Corp.
Copyright Date:
8 October 1929
Copyright Number:
LP748
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric System [Movietone]
Black & white with color sequences
Multicolor
Duration(in mins):
80
Length(in feet):
12,000
Length(in reels):
13
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Young society man Jack Cromwell is summering at the fashionable resort of Southampton, New York, while department store worker Molly Carr lives in the bustling, middle class section of Yorkville. Each locale is introduced at a Fourth of July party. When Jack complains to his friend Molly about his flapper girl friend Jane's reluctance to commit to him, Molly suggests she come to Southampton, pretending to be a society girl, to make Jane jealous. His plan works. However, Jack realizes at length that he loves Molly--all of which provides opportunities for singing and dancing ... +


Young society man Jack Cromwell is summering at the fashionable resort of Southampton, New York, while department store worker Molly Carr lives in the bustling, middle class section of Yorkville. Each locale is introduced at a Fourth of July party. When Jack complains to his friend Molly about his flapper girl friend Jane's reluctance to commit to him, Molly suggests she come to Southampton, pretending to be a society girl, to make Jane jealous. His plan works. However, Jack realizes at length that he loves Molly--all of which provides opportunities for singing and dancing numbers. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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