Caravane (1934)

Drama | 1934

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HISTORY

The onscreen credits for this French-language version of the 1934 film Caravan were taken from a screen credit sheet in the Twentieth Century-Fox Records of the Legal Department in the UCLA Arts--Special Collections Library. Jeannette Marchal translated the English screenplay into French. Gus Kahn did not receive screen credit for writing the lyrics to the songs in the French version; however, according to correspondence in the legal records, Bernard Zimmer, who did receive screen credit, only translated Kahn's English lyrics. According to the legal records, Annabella, Pierre Brasseur and André Berley came from Fox Europa in Paris to be in the French version. A DV news item noted that Annabella was Europe's top star and that André Daven, who supervised the French-language version, was a Fox producer in ... More Less

The onscreen credits for this French-language version of the 1934 film Caravan were taken from a screen credit sheet in the Twentieth Century-Fox Records of the Legal Department in the UCLA Arts--Special Collections Library. Jeannette Marchal translated the English screenplay into French. Gus Kahn did not receive screen credit for writing the lyrics to the songs in the French version; however, according to correspondence in the legal records, Bernard Zimmer, who did receive screen credit, only translated Kahn's English lyrics. According to the legal records, Annabella, Pierre Brasseur and André Berley came from Fox Europa in Paris to be in the French version. A DV news item noted that Annabella was Europe's top star and that André Daven, who supervised the French-language version, was a Fox producer in France. More Less

CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
Erik Charell Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
Mise en scène [Dir]
PRODUCERS
Directeur de production [Prod dir]
WRITERS
D'après la nouvelle de [Based on the novel by]
Adaptée a l'écran par [Adpt]
Adaptée a l'écran par [Adpt]
Dialogue et chansons de [Dial and songs by]
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photographie [Photog]
Photographie [Photog]
SET DECORATORS
Décors [Sets]
Décors [Sets]
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Musique et adaptation de mélodies Hongroises [Mus
Supervision musicale [Mus supv]
Direction musicale [Mus dir]
SOUND
Ingénieur du son [Sd eng]
DANCE
Dir of folk dances
SOURCES
SONGS
"Gypsy Song," by Werner Richard Heymann
"Mon coeur est on Fête," "Ha Cha Cha" and "La chanson du vin," music by Werner Richard Heymann, lyrics by Bernard Zimmer.
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Caravan
Release Date:
1934
Production Date:
une production Erik Charell [an Erik Charell production]
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Noiseless Recording
Black and White
Length(in feet):
9,173
Length(in reels):
11
Country:
United States
Language:
French
SYNOPSIS

[The following plot summary is based on the English-language version of this film, Caravan ; character names refer to that version.] When the wine harvest season arrives in the Tokay region of Hungary, the administrator of the Chateau Tokay contracts with the gypsy chief to employ gypsies for three days. Because the quality of the wine depends on the music played during the harvest, the most important part of the contract instructs Lazi, the blasé gypsy violinist, to compose a new song. Lazi finds the inspiration for his song during an embrace with Tinka, a gypsy girl who loves him but towards whom he has grown somewhat ambivalent. That day marks the return to the chateau of Countess Wilma after fourteen years abroad. Wilma, who expects to become the mistress of the estate when she turns twenty-one the next day, is incensed to learn from the executor of her father's will, her uncle, Baron von Tokay, that she must be married by her twenty-first birthday in order to inherit the estate. The baron desires her to marry his son, Lieutenant von Tokay, who has reluctantly left his friends and consorts in Budapest and is expected to arrive that day. Wilma, however, refuses to comply with the baron's wishes and, hearing Lazi's song, proposes to him. Struck by her beauty, Lazi consents. When the aristocratic guests, disgraced by Lazi's presence, leave the chateau, Wilma opens the house to the gypsies. Although she resists Lazi's attempts to kiss her, she goes with Lazi to an inn, where, dressed as a gypsy, she declares that the "countess" is dead. Lieutenant von Tokay arrives at the inn ... +


[The following plot summary is based on the English-language version of this film, Caravan ; character names refer to that version.] When the wine harvest season arrives in the Tokay region of Hungary, the administrator of the Chateau Tokay contracts with the gypsy chief to employ gypsies for three days. Because the quality of the wine depends on the music played during the harvest, the most important part of the contract instructs Lazi, the blasé gypsy violinist, to compose a new song. Lazi finds the inspiration for his song during an embrace with Tinka, a gypsy girl who loves him but towards whom he has grown somewhat ambivalent. That day marks the return to the chateau of Countess Wilma after fourteen years abroad. Wilma, who expects to become the mistress of the estate when she turns twenty-one the next day, is incensed to learn from the executor of her father's will, her uncle, Baron von Tokay, that she must be married by her twenty-first birthday in order to inherit the estate. The baron desires her to marry his son, Lieutenant von Tokay, who has reluctantly left his friends and consorts in Budapest and is expected to arrive that day. Wilma, however, refuses to comply with the baron's wishes and, hearing Lazi's song, proposes to him. Struck by her beauty, Lazi consents. When the aristocratic guests, disgraced by Lazi's presence, leave the chateau, Wilma opens the house to the gypsies. Although she resists Lazi's attempts to kiss her, she goes with Lazi to an inn, where, dressed as a gypsy, she declares that the "countess" is dead. Lieutenant von Tokay arrives at the inn and, thinking that Wilma is a gypsy, flirts with her. Seeing their mutual interest, Lazi takes Wilma back to the estate, where the gypsies are still celebrating. The lieutenant follows and, after dancing with Wilma, confesses his love; however, when he explains that he is supposed to marry the countess and suggests that Wilma have a clandestine affair with him, she slaps him. At the baron's request, troops arrive to disperse the gypsies, and the lieutenant rides off with Wilma. She allows him to kiss her, but then steals his horse and leaves him stranded. The lieutenant wanders into the gypsy camp, where he finds Tinka crying over her loss of Lazi. He suggests that they try to forget their suffering together, but their attempt at love fails, and the lieutenant discovers that he only wants Wilma. At the estate, when he learns Wilma's true identity, the lieutenant rails at her for marrying a gypsy in order to keep control of her land. Lazi rescues Wilma from a knife attack by the jealous Tinka and then spends the wedding night alone because of a family tradition. Lazi overhears Wilma tell a priest of her unhappiness, and when the priest suggests that Lazi, being a gypsy, would accept one hundred pengö for an annulment, Lazi indignantly tells Wilma that there is not enough money to pay for his love and gives her her freedom for nothing. However, he orders the gypsies to stop playing his music and urges them to steal from the chateau before they leave. Wilma prepares to depart until an innkeeper tells her that the townspeople, fearing a failure of the wine harvest, feel that only she can keep the gypsies from leaving. She then rides out to Lazi and convinces him to play his song so that the harvest can continue. After she and Lazi amicably say goodbye, she discovers that the lieutenant, who learned from Lazi of his break up with Wilma, has taken the reins of her carriage. He and Wilma sing Lazi's song as they happily ride back to the estate. The gypsies also sing as they work, while Lazi gives Trina a necklace that he stole from Wilma, and they embrace in their wagon as they ride off. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.