Why Men Leave Home (1924)

Comedy-drama | April 1924

Director:

John M. Stahl

Writer:

A. P. Younger

Cinematographer:

Sol Polito

Production Designer:

Jack Holden

Production Company:

Louis B. Mayer Productions
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HISTORY

An item in the 17 February 1923 Motion Picture News announced that Louis B. Mayer had purchased screen rights to Avery Hopwood’s 1922 play, Why Men Leave Home. The purchase price was cited as $20,000 in a 15 February 1923 Variety item about a recent boom in the story market. The 7 April 1923 Film Daily claimed that Mayer obtained the rights for director John M. Stahl, who was about to begin work on The Wanters (1923, see entry), another Mayer production.
       An item in the 18 July 1923 Los Angeles Times indicated that Paul Bern was hired to adapt the script. However, the 19 August 1923 Film Daily indicated that A. P. Younger was now writing the adaptation. Filming began late that month or in early September 1923, according to a 6 October 1923 Camera studio chart, which claimed the picture was in its sixth week of production at the Mayer-Schulberg Studio, located at 3800 Mission Road in Los Angeles, CA. Although Dorothy Phillips was initially cast in the lead role and may have done some filming, the 14 September 1923 Los Angeles Times announced that Helene Chadwick had replaced her. Principal photography ended in early or mid-November, as indicated by the 10 November 1923 and 17 November 1923 issues of Camera. According to a 15 December 1923 Motion Picture News brief, Stahl and Younger oversaw the editing.
       In late January 1924, Exhibitors Herald reported that Al Altman, general manager of Louis B. Mayer Productions, was about to embark on a cross-country trip ...

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An item in the 17 February 1923 Motion Picture News announced that Louis B. Mayer had purchased screen rights to Avery Hopwood’s 1922 play, Why Men Leave Home. The purchase price was cited as $20,000 in a 15 February 1923 Variety item about a recent boom in the story market. The 7 April 1923 Film Daily claimed that Mayer obtained the rights for director John M. Stahl, who was about to begin work on The Wanters (1923, see entry), another Mayer production.
       An item in the 18 July 1923 Los Angeles Times indicated that Paul Bern was hired to adapt the script. However, the 19 August 1923 Film Daily indicated that A. P. Younger was now writing the adaptation. Filming began late that month or in early September 1923, according to a 6 October 1923 Camera studio chart, which claimed the picture was in its sixth week of production at the Mayer-Schulberg Studio, located at 3800 Mission Road in Los Angeles, CA. Although Dorothy Phillips was initially cast in the lead role and may have done some filming, the 14 September 1923 Los Angeles Times announced that Helene Chadwick had replaced her. Principal photography ended in early or mid-November, as indicated by the 10 November 1923 and 17 November 1923 issues of Camera. According to a 15 December 1923 Motion Picture News brief, Stahl and Younger oversaw the editing.
       In late January 1924, Exhibitors Herald reported that Al Altman, general manager of Louis B. Mayer Productions, was about to embark on a cross-country trip “in the interests of” Why Men Leave, Thy Name is Woman, and Her Man (1924, see entries). Meanwhile, Jack Fuld did “special advance exploitation work” on the picture, as noted in the 27 May 1924 Film Daily. A general release was slated to take place in late April 1924, according to the 29 March 1924 issues of Exhibitors Trade Review and Moving Picture World. Earlier test runs were planned in various cities, including a premiere in Chicago, IL, which took place the week of 12 March 1924 at Balaban & Katz’s Chicago Theatre, according to the 12 March 1924 Variety.
       A mixed review in the 14 May 1924 Variety stated that this film veered significantly from the underlying play.
       According to the Library of Congress American Silent Feature Film Survival Database, this film is extant.

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Camera
8 Sep 1923
p. 17
Camera
6 Oct 1923
p. 17
Camera
10 Nov 1923
p. 17
Camera
17 Nov 1923
p. 17
Exhibitors Herald
26 Jan 1924
p. 45
Exhibitors Herald
8 Mar 1924
p. 59
Exhibitors Trade Review
29 Mar 1924
p. 21
Film Daily
7 Apr 1923
p. 4
Film Daily
19 Aug 1923
p. 2
Film Daily
6 Sep 1923
p. 4
Film Daily
14 Oct 1923
p. 11
Film Daily
28 Apr 1924
p. 3
Film Daily
25 May 1924
p. 8
Film Daily
27 May 1924
p. 7
Los Angeles Times
18 Jul 1923
Section WF, p. 15
Los Angeles Times
14 Sep 1923
Section II, p. 9
Los Angeles Times
30 Mar 1924
p. 23
Motion Picture News
17 Feb 1923
p. 813
Motion Picture News
6 Oct 1923
p. 1638
Motion Picture News
20 Oct 1923
p. 1876
Motion Picture News
15 Dec 1923
p. 2808
Moving Picture World
29 Mar 1924
p. 367
Variety
15 Feb 1923
p. 46
Variety
7 May 1924
p. 24
Variety
14 May 1924
p. 27
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
ART DIRECTOR
Jack Holden
Art dir
FILM EDITORS
Robert Kern
Film ed
Film ed
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play Why Men Leave Home by Avery Hopwood (New York, 12 Sep 1922).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
DETAILS
Release Date:
April 1924
Premiere Information:
Chicago, IL, opening: week of 12 Mar 1924; Los Angeles opening: 30 Mar 1924; New York opening: 11 May 1924
Production Date:
late Aug or early Sep--late Oct or early Nov 1923
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Louis B. Mayer Productions
12 March 1924
LP19986; LP20057
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
8,002
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

John and Irene Emerson's marriage begins well enough, but it is not long before John becomes less attentive. Feeling neglected, Irene spends more time with her girl friends, and John, consequently, falls prey to the vamping wiles of his secretary, Jean Ralston. When John comes home from the theater smelling of Jean's perfume, Irene procures a divorce; John then marries Jean. Grandma Sutton cleverly maneuvers John and Irene into her house and has it quarantined. They realize they love each other; John divorces Jean, remarries Irene, and takes her on a second ...

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John and Irene Emerson's marriage begins well enough, but it is not long before John becomes less attentive. Feeling neglected, Irene spends more time with her girl friends, and John, consequently, falls prey to the vamping wiles of his secretary, Jean Ralston. When John comes home from the theater smelling of Jean's perfume, Irene procures a divorce; John then marries Jean. Grandma Sutton cleverly maneuvers John and Irene into her house and has it quarantined. They realize they love each other; John divorces Jean, remarries Irene, and takes her on a second honeymoon.

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GENRE
Genre:


Subject

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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