Young Man of Manhattan (1930)

79 mins | Drama | 17 May 1930

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
EHW
26 Apr 1930
p. 30
Film Daily
20 Apr 1930
p. 10
New York Times
9 Feb 1930
p. 7
New York Times
16 Mar 1930
p. 6
New York Times
27 Apr 1930
p. 5
New Yorker
26 Apr 1930
p. 83
Time
28 Apr 1930
p. 42
Variety
23 Apr 1930
p. 36
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
WRITERS
Robert Presnell
Adpt
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SOUND
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Young Man of Manhattan by Katherine Brush (New York, 1930).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
SONGS
"Good 'n' Plenty," "I've Got It," "I'd Fall in Love All Over Again" and "I'll Bob Up with the Bob-O-Link," words and music by Irving Kahal, Pierre Norman and Sammy Fain.
SONGWRITER/COMPOSER
DETAILS
Release Date:
17 May 1930
Premiere Information:
New York opening: week of 18 Apr 1930
Production Date:
began 3 Feb 1930 at Astoria Studios, Long Island
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Paramount Publix Corp.
17 May 1930
LP1307
Physical Properties:
Sound
Movietone
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
79
Length(in feet):
7,306
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Toby McLean, New York sportswriter, meets movie columnist Ann Vaughn while covering the Dempsey-Tunney fight in Philadelphia, and their subsequent romance leads to marriage. They begin life modestly in a New York apartment, but shortly afterward he is sent to St. Louis to cover the World Series and is introduced to Puffy Randolph, a dizzy young socialite, though he is too engrossed with Ann to notice her. Soon he becomes jealous of his wife's success and earnings and goes on the town with Puffy; they again meet at the bicycle races, and returning home drunk, he is ordered from the house by his wife. They separate, but when Ann is temporarily blinded by tainted liquor, Toby realizes she still loves him and plunges into his work; with the aid of his fellow reporter, Shorty Ross, he regains his self-esteem and is reunited with ...

More Less

Toby McLean, New York sportswriter, meets movie columnist Ann Vaughn while covering the Dempsey-Tunney fight in Philadelphia, and their subsequent romance leads to marriage. They begin life modestly in a New York apartment, but shortly afterward he is sent to St. Louis to cover the World Series and is introduced to Puffy Randolph, a dizzy young socialite, though he is too engrossed with Ann to notice her. Soon he becomes jealous of his wife's success and earnings and goes on the town with Puffy; they again meet at the bicycle races, and returning home drunk, he is ordered from the house by his wife. They separate, but when Ann is temporarily blinded by tainted liquor, Toby realizes she still loves him and plunges into his work; with the aid of his fellow reporter, Shorty Ross, he regains his self-esteem and is reunited with Ann.

Less

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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