Young Man of Manhattan (1930)

79 mins | Drama | 17 May 1930

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HISTORY

Young Man of Manhattan marked the feature film debut of Ginger Rogers. Richard Arlen was initially cast opposite lead actress Claudette Colbert, as announced in the 19 November 1929 Los Angeles Times, but he did not remain with the project. Katherine Brush, author of the 1930 novel on which the film was based, visited Paramount Publix Corp.’s studio in Long Island, NY, where she conferred with writer Robert Presnell on the script adaptation, according to a 7 January 1930 Film Daily news brief. Shooting began at the Long Island studio the following month, on 3 February 1930. The 2 February 1930 and 3 February 1930 issues of Film Daily identified Walter Wanger as head of feature production at the studio, James R. Cowan as general manager, and Frank Heath as casting director.
       As noted in the 5 February 1930 Film Daily, director Monta Bell’s experience as a former newspaper reporter made him particularly qualified to depict the story of sports writer “Toby McLean” with authentic details. An article in the 9 February 1930 New York Times noted that Bell chose to construct a four-wall living room set, instead of the customary two or three-walled set for camera mobility, “to gain realism and acoustical improvement in the recording.” A fight scene recreating the 1926 Tunney-Dempsey boxing match in Philadelphia, PA, was enhanced with artificial rain that required 100,000 gallons of water, according to the 16 March 1930 New York Times. The 23 February 1930 issue also noted that Bell cast Tommy Reilly, the real-life referee of that fight, to play himself. The fight scene called ...

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Young Man of Manhattan marked the feature film debut of Ginger Rogers. Richard Arlen was initially cast opposite lead actress Claudette Colbert, as announced in the 19 November 1929 Los Angeles Times, but he did not remain with the project. Katherine Brush, author of the 1930 novel on which the film was based, visited Paramount Publix Corp.’s studio in Long Island, NY, where she conferred with writer Robert Presnell on the script adaptation, according to a 7 January 1930 Film Daily news brief. Shooting began at the Long Island studio the following month, on 3 February 1930. The 2 February 1930 and 3 February 1930 issues of Film Daily identified Walter Wanger as head of feature production at the studio, James R. Cowan as general manager, and Frank Heath as casting director.
       As noted in the 5 February 1930 Film Daily, director Monta Bell’s experience as a former newspaper reporter made him particularly qualified to depict the story of sports writer “Toby McLean” with authentic details. An article in the 9 February 1930 New York Times noted that Bell chose to construct a four-wall living room set, instead of the customary two or three-walled set for camera mobility, “to gain realism and acoustical improvement in the recording.” A fight scene recreating the 1926 Tunney-Dempsey boxing match in Philadelphia, PA, was enhanced with artificial rain that required 100,000 gallons of water, according to the 16 March 1930 New York Times. The 23 February 1930 issue also noted that Bell cast Tommy Reilly, the real-life referee of that fight, to play himself. The fight scene called for a number of extras, and as noted in the 5 March 1930 Variety, “several hundred strikers of the Ladies Garment Workers’ Union” appeared in the scene at a rate of $7.50 per day.
       Principal photography was completed in the last week of February 1930, four days ahead of schedule, as reported in the 2 March 1930 Film Daily and 5 March 1930 Variety.
       An item in the 9 February 1930 Film Daily announced that young actor John MacDowell was cast in the picture.
       Theatrical release on 17 May 1930 was preceded by a New York City opening on 18 April 1930. According to a 15 April 1930 Film Daily item, in addition to the sound version of this film a silent version was edited by Emma Hill.
       According to the Library of Congress American Silent Feature Film Survival Database, this film is extant.

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
EHW
26 Apr 1930
p. 30
Film Daily
7 Jan 1930
p. 8
Film Daily
2 Feb 1930
pp. 1-2
Film Daily
3 Feb 1930
p. 5
Film Daily
5 Feb 1930
p. 8
Film Daily
9 Feb 1930
p. 5
Film Daily
2 Mar 1930
p. 9
Film Daily
30 Mar 1930
p. 6
Film Daily
15 Apr 1930
p. 7
Film Daily
20 Apr 1930
p. 10
Los Angeles Times
19 Nov 1929
Section A, p. 8
Los Angeles Times
13 Feb 1930
Section A, p. 8
Motion Picture News
26 Apr 1930
p. 45
New York Times
9 Feb 1930
p. 7
New York Times
16 Mar 1930
p. 6
New York Times
19 Apr 1930
p. 22
New York Times
27 Apr 1930
p. 5
New Yorker
26 Apr 1930
p. 83
Time
28 Apr 1930
p. 42
Variety
5 Mar 1930
p. 50, 54
Variety
23 Apr 1930
p. 36
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
WRITERS
Robert Presnell
Adpt
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SOUND
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Young Man of Manhattan by Katherine Brush (New York, 1930).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
SONGS
"Good 'n' Plenty," "I've Got It," "I'd Fall in Love All Over Again" and "I'll Bob Up with the Bob-O-Link," words and music by Irving Kahal, Pierre Norman and Sammy Fain.
SONGWRITER/COMPOSER
DETAILS
Release Date:
17 May 1930
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 18 Apr 1930
Production Date:
began 3 Feb 1930 at Astoria Studios, Long Island
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Paramount Publix Corp.
17 May 1930
LP1307
Physical Properties:
Sound
Movietone
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
79
Length(in feet):
7,306
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Toby McLean, New York sportswriter, meets movie columnist Ann Vaughn while covering the Dempsey-Tunney fight in Philadelphia, and their subsequent romance leads to marriage. They begin life modestly in a New York apartment, but shortly afterward he is sent to St. Louis to cover the World Series and is introduced to Puffy Randolph, a dizzy young socialite, though he is too engrossed with Ann to notice her. Soon he becomes jealous of his wife's success and earnings and goes on the town with Puffy; they again meet at the bicycle races, and returning home drunk, he is ordered from the house by his wife. They separate, but when Ann is temporarily blinded by tainted liquor, Toby realizes she still loves him and plunges into his work; with the aid of his fellow reporter, Shorty Ross, he regains his self-esteem and is reunited with ...

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Toby McLean, New York sportswriter, meets movie columnist Ann Vaughn while covering the Dempsey-Tunney fight in Philadelphia, and their subsequent romance leads to marriage. They begin life modestly in a New York apartment, but shortly afterward he is sent to St. Louis to cover the World Series and is introduced to Puffy Randolph, a dizzy young socialite, though he is too engrossed with Ann to notice her. Soon he becomes jealous of his wife's success and earnings and goes on the town with Puffy; they again meet at the bicycle races, and returning home drunk, he is ordered from the house by his wife. They separate, but when Ann is temporarily blinded by tainted liquor, Toby realizes she still loves him and plunges into his work; with the aid of his fellow reporter, Shorty Ross, he regains his self-esteem and is reunited with Ann.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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