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HISTORY

The 29 April 1916 Motion Picture News announced that The Quitter "has just been put into production. The exterior scenes will be photographed along the Mexican border....[I]t was necessary for the Metro players to go there, as the scenery and buildings they desire can only be found in that section. Most of the time the company is in New Mexico, it will be obliged to live in tents. Every member has been supplied with a special permit to carry firearms, and will be well protected against raiders or intruders. Leander de Cordova, who was recently made an assistant director to Charles Horan,...speaks the kind of Mexican heard along the border." Among the listed cast members was William Davidson , who ultimately was not credited in the final film.
       However, according to the 1 July 1916 Moving Picture World, the company decided to forego the dangers and expenses of filming in what was essentially a war zone where Mexican revolutionaries under Pancho Villa were making incursions across the U.S border. The item stated: "Director Horan found an ideal western mining location near Delaware Water Gap [in Pennsylvania], where he built an entire town. The 'Three Cheers' saloon is one of the many picturesque sets, as is the western courtroom scene, where the trial is held. Mr Horan has used many real western types, including Indians and half breeds, who were brought East for this feature."
       Reviewer H. S. Fuld, in the 29 July 1916 Motion Picture News, described the action: "After many amusing adventures, during which Jack is twice arrested, placed in jail, escapes, is held up motor bandits, thrown from a ...

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The 29 April 1916 Motion Picture News announced that The Quitter "has just been put into production. The exterior scenes will be photographed along the Mexican border....[I]t was necessary for the Metro players to go there, as the scenery and buildings they desire can only be found in that section. Most of the time the company is in New Mexico, it will be obliged to live in tents. Every member has been supplied with a special permit to carry firearms, and will be well protected against raiders or intruders. Leander de Cordova, who was recently made an assistant director to Charles Horan,...speaks the kind of Mexican heard along the border." Among the listed cast members was William Davidson , who ultimately was not credited in the final film.
       However, according to the 1 July 1916 Moving Picture World, the company decided to forego the dangers and expenses of filming in what was essentially a war zone where Mexican revolutionaries under Pancho Villa were making incursions across the U.S border. The item stated: "Director Horan found an ideal western mining location near Delaware Water Gap [in Pennsylvania], where he built an entire town. The 'Three Cheers' saloon is one of the many picturesque sets, as is the western courtroom scene, where the trial is held. Mr Horan has used many real western types, including Indians and half breeds, who were brought East for this feature."
       Reviewer H. S. Fuld, in the 29 July 1916 Motion Picture News, described the action: "After many amusing adventures, during which Jack is twice arrested, placed in jail, escapes, is held up motor bandits, thrown from a moving train, and other minor escapades, he finally arrives back in town at the opportune moment. He saves his girl from an attack by a 'rum hounds,' saves his claim from some mine sharks, and all is well."
       B. A. Rolfe's studios were located at 3 West 63rd Street in New York City, according to the 26 August 1916 Moving Picture World. Rolfe had recently assumed "general supervision of all productions and will have immediate charge of all the directors," and Maxwell Karger was now in charge of the casting and scenarios departments.
       The September 1916 Picture-Play Magazine ran an eleven-page, photo-illustrated short-story adaptation of the scenario for The Quitter.
       According to the Library of Congress American Silent Feature Film Survival Database, this film is extant.

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Motion Picture News
29 Apr 1916
p. 2519
Motion Picture News
29 Jul 1916
p. 633
Motography
29 Apr 1916
p. 981
Motography
29 Jul 1916
p. 269, 290
Moving Picture World
1 Jul 1916
p. 113
Moving Picture World
29 Jul 1916
p. 805, 843, 844
Moving Picture World
26 Aug 1916
p. 1414
New York Clipper
29 Jul 1916
p. 36
NYDM
25 Feb 1916
p. 23
Picture-Play Magazine
Sep 1916
pp. 47-57
Wid's
10 Aug 1916
p. 778
DETAILS
Release Date:
10 July 1916
Production Date:

Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Rolfe Photoplays, Inc.
15 July 1916
LP8715
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
5,000
Length(in reels):
5
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

The miners of Paradise Gulch, drinking in the Three Cheers saloon and thinking the bleak town might be livened up with a woman, decide that young "Happy Jack" Lewis, the town prankster, needs a woman and pool their money to insert an ad for a mail-order bride in an Eastern newspaper. Glad Mason responds, and is sent a ticket, but Jack, thinking the mail-order bride will be hideously ugly, panics and hops the next train out of train. But not before signing over his shack and his claim to her as compensation. When Glad arrives, a reception committee greets her, and seeing that she is pleasant to the eyes, the miners begin competing for her hand in Jack's stead. Meanwhile, a forgetful "Happy Jack" sells the mine to the unscrupulous W. E. Willet, who has inside information, unavailable even to "Happy Jack," that the mine is worth a fortune. Finally, "Happy Jack" returns to town, and instantly falls in love with Glad. Before the wedding can take place, however, Willet has "Happy Jack" arrested for selling him a mine that was not his to sell. Glad gives the mine to Willet when he agrees to drop the charge, but then it is revealed that Willet's information is wrong: The real gold mine is on the land that was willed to Glad by her father. So, although he loses his mine, "Happy Jack" gets a millionaire wife in ...

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The miners of Paradise Gulch, drinking in the Three Cheers saloon and thinking the bleak town might be livened up with a woman, decide that young "Happy Jack" Lewis, the town prankster, needs a woman and pool their money to insert an ad for a mail-order bride in an Eastern newspaper. Glad Mason responds, and is sent a ticket, but Jack, thinking the mail-order bride will be hideously ugly, panics and hops the next train out of train. But not before signing over his shack and his claim to her as compensation. When Glad arrives, a reception committee greets her, and seeing that she is pleasant to the eyes, the miners begin competing for her hand in Jack's stead. Meanwhile, a forgetful "Happy Jack" sells the mine to the unscrupulous W. E. Willet, who has inside information, unavailable even to "Happy Jack," that the mine is worth a fortune. Finally, "Happy Jack" returns to town, and instantly falls in love with Glad. Before the wedding can take place, however, Willet has "Happy Jack" arrested for selling him a mine that was not his to sell. Glad gives the mine to Willet when he agrees to drop the charge, but then it is revealed that Willet's information is wrong: The real gold mine is on the land that was willed to Glad by her father. So, although he loses his mine, "Happy Jack" gets a millionaire wife in exchange.

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GENRE
Genre:


Subject

Subject (Minor):
Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.