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HISTORY

According to the 19 May 1917 Motion Picture News, director William Worthington had just completed The Clean-Up at Universal City. It was one of several 1917 films that Franklyn Farnum and Brownie Vernon made together for Bluebird. Their previous two pictures, both directed by Worthington, were Bringing Home Father and The Car of Chance (see entries). Brownie was sometimes billed as Agnes Vernon.
       The November 1917 Photoplay pointed out the film's "sad discrepancies," saying, "There are such blemishes as the hero, right on Main street before the town's collection of tabbies, kissing the nice girl, and the palm trees that flourish ungeographically along the streets of the Illinois town. Even the refreshing naturalness of Miss Vernon, and the cleverness of the idea cannot blot out completely the plain carelessness that admits of such lack of care and common sense." Variety agreed: "The film is supposed to have its locale in Weston, Ill. Throughout the picture one sees palms and rich foliage bespeaking of California or Florida scenery, and on the machines used one sees California state licenses." Variety also pointed out that the hero, an advance man for a burlesque revue who normally would have arrived a day or so ahead of the traveling show, "must have been about two or three weeks ahead, with time to burn" in town. It further complained that there "was no excuse of the robbery, and it was very poorly staged anyway....The picture needs revision and some consistency inserted into the general direction."
       The 29 July 1917 Los Angeles Times reported that The Clean-Up ...

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According to the 19 May 1917 Motion Picture News, director William Worthington had just completed The Clean-Up at Universal City. It was one of several 1917 films that Franklyn Farnum and Brownie Vernon made together for Bluebird. Their previous two pictures, both directed by Worthington, were Bringing Home Father and The Car of Chance (see entries). Brownie was sometimes billed as Agnes Vernon.
       The November 1917 Photoplay pointed out the film's "sad discrepancies," saying, "There are such blemishes as the hero, right on Main street before the town's collection of tabbies, kissing the nice girl, and the palm trees that flourish ungeographically along the streets of the Illinois town. Even the refreshing naturalness of Miss Vernon, and the cleverness of the idea cannot blot out completely the plain carelessness that admits of such lack of care and common sense." Variety agreed: "The film is supposed to have its locale in Weston, Ill. Throughout the picture one sees palms and rich foliage bespeaking of California or Florida scenery, and on the machines used one sees California state licenses." Variety also pointed out that the hero, an advance man for a burlesque revue who normally would have arrived a day or so ahead of the traveling show, "must have been about two or three weeks ahead, with time to burn" in town. It further complained that there "was no excuse of the robbery, and it was very poorly staged anyway....The picture needs revision and some consistency inserted into the general direction."
       The 29 July 1917 Los Angeles Times reported that The Clean-Up was being featured at the Superba that week, accompanied by "sensational views of the Russian revolution, showing the rioting and anarchy that prevailed in Petrograd when the ruling dynasty was overthrown." The October Revolution, during which the Bolsheviks took over, was still a few months away.
       According to the Library of Congress American Silent Feature Film Survival Database, this film is extant.

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Exhibitors Herald
18 Aug 1917
p. 25, 26
Exhibitors Trade Review
11 Aug 1917
p. 786
Los Angeles Times
29 Jul 1917
p. 31
Motion Picture News
19 May 1917
p. 3154
Motion Picture News
18 Aug 1917
p. 1118
Motion Picture News
25 Aug 1917
p. 1319, 1320
Motography
25 Aug 1917
p. 424
Motography
22 Sep 1917
p. 535
Moving Picture World
21 Jul 1917
p. 487
Moving Picture World
18 Aug 1917
p. 1082, 1120
New York Clipper
8 Aug 1917
p. 38
Photoplay
Nov 1917
p. 129
Variety
10 Aug 1917
p. 27
Wid's
9 Aug 1917
pp. 509-10
DETAILS
Release Date:
6 August 1917
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 29 July 1917
Production Date:
ended mid-May 1917
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Bluebird Photoplays, Inc.
11 July 1917
LP11079
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
65
Length(in feet):
5,000
Length(in reels):
5
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Stuart Adams, the advance-agent for a traveling burlesque troupe, arrives in Weston, Illinois, his hometown, to publicize the coming show, The Girl and the Garter. The Purity League, led by banker James Richards, the father of Stuart's childhood sweetheart Hazel, attempts to stop it from opening. After kissing Hazel in public—thus outraging the League members—Stuart builds curiosity about the show by having the newspaper print Richards' admission that he viewed it in New York "to see how shocking it was." Stuart also attaches a banner advertising the show to Hazel's roadster during a Purity League parade. After Stuart challenges Richards to a debate, Stuart helps detective Vera Vincent, whom he met on the train, capture two crooks trying to rob Richards' bank. During the debate, Stuart, having been notified by telegram that the show has been cancelled, offers to end the bickering by withdrawing the show. Richards then insists that Stuart, who plans to meet Hazel at the train station to elope, come to dinner. Stuart accepts, which is fortunate, because Hazel had been locked in her room by her aunt, and would not have been at the train ...

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Stuart Adams, the advance-agent for a traveling burlesque troupe, arrives in Weston, Illinois, his hometown, to publicize the coming show, The Girl and the Garter. The Purity League, led by banker James Richards, the father of Stuart's childhood sweetheart Hazel, attempts to stop it from opening. After kissing Hazel in public—thus outraging the League members—Stuart builds curiosity about the show by having the newspaper print Richards' admission that he viewed it in New York "to see how shocking it was." Stuart also attaches a banner advertising the show to Hazel's roadster during a Purity League parade. After Stuart challenges Richards to a debate, Stuart helps detective Vera Vincent, whom he met on the train, capture two crooks trying to rob Richards' bank. During the debate, Stuart, having been notified by telegram that the show has been cancelled, offers to end the bickering by withdrawing the show. Richards then insists that Stuart, who plans to meet Hazel at the train station to elope, come to dinner. Stuart accepts, which is fortunate, because Hazel had been locked in her room by her aunt, and would not have been at the train station.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.