Fashion Row (1923)

Melodrama | 3 December 1923

Director:

Robert Z. Leonard

Producer:

M. Leonard

Cinematographer:

Oliver T. Marsh

Production Designer:

Horace Jackson

Production Company:

Tiffany Productions, Inc.
Full page view
HISTORY

The 2 May 1923 Film Daily announced the upcoming picture by its working title, Conquest. Five weeks later, the 23 Jun 1923 Motion Picture News stated that the title had been officially changed to Fashion Row. The 2 Feb 1924 Film Tribune noted that lead actress Mae Murray had purchased the original story from writers Sada Cowan and Howard Higgin, then assigned them to write the scenario.
       Principal photography began during Jun 1923 in the New York City area, including location shots of the Broadway district and interior scenes at a Long Island, NY, studio, as reported in the 5 Jul 1923 Film Daily, the 28 Jul 1923 Exhibitors Trade Review, and the 18 Aug 1923 and 1 Sep 1923 issues of Motion Picture News. The Broadway backgrounds were then reproduced when filming resumed in late Aug 1923 at Goldwyn Studios in Culver City, CA.
       The 11 Aug 1923 Camera noted that Murray took a hiatus from the production to arrange a special performance by an eighty-piece orchestra for 12,000 underprivileged children at the Hollywood Bowl in Los Angeles, CA. She was reportedly known afterward as “The Fairy Godmother of the Bowl.”
       News items in the 22 Sep 1923 Exhibitors Herald and the 29 Sep 1923 Exhibitors Trade Review credited Robert Haines as a cast member and Cedric Gibbons as art director, respectively. However, other sources have attributed art direction to Horace Jackson. According to the 25 Aug 1923 Exhibitors Trade Review, Murray ...

More Less

The 2 May 1923 Film Daily announced the upcoming picture by its working title, Conquest. Five weeks later, the 23 Jun 1923 Motion Picture News stated that the title had been officially changed to Fashion Row. The 2 Feb 1924 Film Tribune noted that lead actress Mae Murray had purchased the original story from writers Sada Cowan and Howard Higgin, then assigned them to write the scenario.
       Principal photography began during Jun 1923 in the New York City area, including location shots of the Broadway district and interior scenes at a Long Island, NY, studio, as reported in the 5 Jul 1923 Film Daily, the 28 Jul 1923 Exhibitors Trade Review, and the 18 Aug 1923 and 1 Sep 1923 issues of Motion Picture News. The Broadway backgrounds were then reproduced when filming resumed in late Aug 1923 at Goldwyn Studios in Culver City, CA.
       The 11 Aug 1923 Camera noted that Murray took a hiatus from the production to arrange a special performance by an eighty-piece orchestra for 12,000 underprivileged children at the Hollywood Bowl in Los Angeles, CA. She was reportedly known afterward as “The Fairy Godmother of the Bowl.”
       News items in the 22 Sep 1923 Exhibitors Herald and the 29 Sep 1923 Exhibitors Trade Review credited Robert Haines as a cast member and Cedric Gibbons as art director, respectively. However, other sources have attributed art direction to Horace Jackson. According to the 25 Aug 1923 Exhibitors Trade Review, Murray introduced several new dances in the film, and wore “approximately 100 different gowns,” according to the 25 Aug 1923 Exhibitors Trade Review. Some of the gowns were reportedly based on Murray’s own sketches while others were imported from Paris, France, as stated in the 8 Dec 1923 Moving Picture World. However, the 29 Dec 1923 Exhibitors Herald later reduced the number of gowns to thirty, and implied that they were all rather scanty by contemporary standards. An item in the 13 Oct 1923 Camera identified Arthur Jell as “leader of the orchestra” playing for the film, although it was not specified whether he was providing music on set or involved in writing the theatrical score. Principal photography was completed later that month, as reported in the 3 Nov 1923 Exhibitors Trade Review. An advertisement in the 10 Nov 1923 Camera attributed the subtitles to Quality Title & Film Co., with “hand lettering” by Irving W. Bunze and camera work by Eli Cohn.
       The 8 Dec 1923 Moving Picture World stated that Fashion Row was scheduled to open on 3 Dec 1923. The article also credited M. H. Hoffman as the studio’s general manager. A Los Angeles debut followed at Loew’s State Theatre, according to the 2 Feb 1924 Moving Picture World. No date was specified. Reviews were generally positive, although the 31 Jan 1924 Var described the storyline as “rather threadbare.” A letter appearing in the Oct 1924 Pictures and the Picturegoer described a masked ball scene in which Murray hands her mask to friend and walks away; the friend calls her back and Murray is suddenly holding the mask again.
The 19 Jan 1923 Exhibitors Trade Review noted that a song, also titled “Fashion Row,” had been published by Sunset Music Co. to coincide with the picture’s release.

Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Camera
11 Aug 1923
p. 13
Camera
13 Oct 1923
p. 14
Camera
10 Nov 1923
p. 22
Exhibitors Herald
22 Sep 1923
p. 65
Exhibitors Herald
22 Dec 1923
p. 43
Exhibitors Herald
29 Dec 1923
p. 57
Exhibitors Trade Review
28 Jul 1923
p. 378
Exhibitors Trade Review
25 Aug 1923
p. 546
Exhibitors Trade Review
29 Sep 1923
p. 810
Exhibitors Trade Review
3 Nov 1923
p. 1049
Exhibitors Trade Review
22 Dec 1923
p. 25
Exhibitors Trade Review
19 Jan 1924
p. 33
Film Daily
2 May 1923
p. 2
Film Daily
5 Jul 1923
p. 1
Film Daily
2 Dec 1923
p. 8
Film Tribune
2 Feb 1924
p. 9
Motion Picture News
23 Jun 1923
p. 2945
Motion Picture News
18 Aug 1923
p. 799
Motion Picture News
1 Sep 1923
p. 1102
Motion Picture News
8 Dec 1923
p. 2693
Moving Picture World
8 Dec 1923
p. 572
Moving Picture World
2 Feb 1924
p. 378
Photoplay
Feb 1924
p. 65
Pictures and the Picturegoer
Oct 1924
p. 50
Screen Opinions
15-31 Dec 1923
pp. 111-112
Variety
31 Jan 1924
p. 23
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Conquest
Release Date:
3 December 1923
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: Dec 1923 or Jan 1924
Production Date:
Jun--Oct 1923
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Tiffany Productions, Inc.
5 December 1923
LP19732
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
7,300
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

The two peasant Farinova sisters flee Russia during the revolution and sail to America. Olga masquerades as a princess, becomes a noted actress, and marries a millionaire's son. She later repudiates her younger sister, Zita, who has no illusions about her past life or present poverty. After Olga is shot by Kaminoff, a rejected suitor, Zita is adopted into her brother-in-law's ...

More Less

The two peasant Farinova sisters flee Russia during the revolution and sail to America. Olga masquerades as a princess, becomes a noted actress, and marries a millionaire's son. She later repudiates her younger sister, Zita, who has no illusions about her past life or present poverty. After Olga is shot by Kaminoff, a rejected suitor, Zita is adopted into her brother-in-law's family.

Less

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

The White Tower

Contemporary news items add the following information about the production: RKO purchased James Ramsey Ullman's novel in Mar 1946 for $150,000. At that time, Edward Dmytryk was assigned to ... >>

The Wizard of Oz

The following dedication appears in the opening credits: “For nearly forty years this story has given faithful service to the Young in Heart; and Time has been powerless to ... >>

Tight Spot

The working title of this film was Dead Pidgeon . Doye O'Dell appears throughout the film in a running "gag" as a TV telethon host, satirizing the ... >>

King of Jazz

The 4 Jan 1930 Exhibitors Herald-World announced that the production starting date was 4 Nov 1929.
       The main title credits Paul Whiteman and his Band as "Exclusive ... >>

All Quiet on the Western Front

The opening title card reads: "Carl Laemmle presents All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque ." After the opening credits, the following written prologue ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.