Full page view
HISTORY

The story of this film was based on actual incidents in the anti-vice campaign of the Rev. Paul Smith in San Francisco. One source suggests that Rev. Paul Smith wrote the scenario. The film was sponsored by Smith's church, several newspapers, and the Church of Strangers in New York. A special musical score was prepared for the film. The film was scheduled to open at the Lyric Theatre in New York on 29 Jun 1918, but because Commissioner Gilchrist of the Bureau of Licenses sent a warning that the Lyric Theater Company's license would be revoked if it exhibited the film, which the Commissioner thought was immoral, another film was shown in its place. Gilchrist was ordered to appear in court to show cause.
       The film had its premiere in Washington, D.C., and in Seattle, Washington on 21 Jul 1918, and was endorsed by Major Raymond Pullman, Superintendent of Police in Washington, D.C., and by Mayor Ole Hanson of Seattle. Film taken of Mayor Hanson welcoming Rev. Paul Smith was used as a prologue to showings of the film in the North West. The Finger of Justice was banned in Maryland by the Maryland State Board of ... More Less

The story of this film was based on actual incidents in the anti-vice campaign of the Rev. Paul Smith in San Francisco. One source suggests that Rev. Paul Smith wrote the scenario. The film was sponsored by Smith's church, several newspapers, and the Church of Strangers in New York. A special musical score was prepared for the film. The film was scheduled to open at the Lyric Theatre in New York on 29 Jun 1918, but because Commissioner Gilchrist of the Bureau of Licenses sent a warning that the Lyric Theater Company's license would be revoked if it exhibited the film, which the Commissioner thought was immoral, another film was shown in its place. Gilchrist was ordered to appear in court to show cause.
       The film had its premiere in Washington, D.C., and in Seattle, Washington on 21 Jul 1918, and was endorsed by Major Raymond Pullman, Superintendent of Police in Washington, D.C., and by Mayor Ole Hanson of Seattle. Film taken of Mayor Hanson welcoming Rev. Paul Smith was used as a prologue to showings of the film in the North West. The Finger of Justice was banned in Maryland by the Maryland State Board of Censors. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
ETR
6 Jul 18
p. 384.
ETR
10 Aug 18
p. 817.
Motog
13 Jul 18
p. 55.
MPN
2 Jun 18
p. 18.
MPW
6 Jul 18
p. 112.
MPW
13 Jul 18
p. 256.
DETAILS
Release Date:
July 1918
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

In order to further his own political and financial aims, political boss William Randall allows corruption to flourish in his city. Minister Noel Delaney, however, declares war on the "system," aided by his college sweetheart, Mary. Flip, an underworld thug, lures Randall's daughter Betty into a notorious underworld resort, unaware of her identity. Through Mary, Delaney discovers Betty's whereabouts and rescues her. When Randall learns of the situation, he fights with Flip and is killed. With the population up in arms against the system, Delaney and Mary eventually work its downfall and clean up the ... +


In order to further his own political and financial aims, political boss William Randall allows corruption to flourish in his city. Minister Noel Delaney, however, declares war on the "system," aided by his college sweetheart, Mary. Flip, an underworld thug, lures Randall's daughter Betty into a notorious underworld resort, unaware of her identity. Through Mary, Delaney discovers Betty's whereabouts and rescues her. When Randall learns of the situation, he fights with Flip and is killed. With the population up in arms against the system, Delaney and Mary eventually work its downfall and clean up the city. +

GENRE
Genre:


Subject
Subject (Major):

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.