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HISTORY

This film opened in New York City under the title Proud Heart, the title under which the film was reviewed in Var. Its working title was The Jew. ...

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This film opened in New York City under the title Proud Heart, the title under which the film was reviewed in Var. Its working title was The Jew.

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
15 Nov 1925
---
Motion Picture News
14 Nov 1925
p. 2356
Photoplay
Dec 1925
p. 46
Variety
4 Nov 1925
p. 40
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Proud Heart
The Jew
Release Date:
27 December 1925
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 1 Nov 1925
Production Date:

Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Universal Pictures Corp.
17 November 1925
LP22021
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
8,983
Length(in reels):
9
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Rabbi Cominsky, the father of two sons, ekes out a living in New York's Lower East Side as a pushcart peddler. He favors the studious and ambitious Morris, the elder, who wants to be a lawyer, rather than the loyal Sammy, who sells papers and who helps put his older brother through college. Cominsky finds out that Sammy has become a prizefighter under the name "Battling Rooney" and drives him out of the house. Morris demands that his father buy him a dress suit, so Cominsky pawns his overcoat to get one (which Morris throws in an ashcan) and becomes seriously ill from exposure to the cold. Cominsky passes the crisis but is told he must go to a warmer climate. Morris, meanwhile, has become engaged to marry Ruth Stein, his boss's daughter, but is ashamed of his parentage. Cominsky arrives at the engagement party, and Morris refuses to acknowledge his own father. Sammy, after winning the lightweight championship, faces up to his brother, denounces him, and drags him home. Morris, realizing his sin, begs and receives forgiveness. Cominsky acknowledges his gratitude to Sammy and gives his blessing to Sammy's Irish sweetheart, ...

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Rabbi Cominsky, the father of two sons, ekes out a living in New York's Lower East Side as a pushcart peddler. He favors the studious and ambitious Morris, the elder, who wants to be a lawyer, rather than the loyal Sammy, who sells papers and who helps put his older brother through college. Cominsky finds out that Sammy has become a prizefighter under the name "Battling Rooney" and drives him out of the house. Morris demands that his father buy him a dress suit, so Cominsky pawns his overcoat to get one (which Morris throws in an ashcan) and becomes seriously ill from exposure to the cold. Cominsky passes the crisis but is told he must go to a warmer climate. Morris, meanwhile, has become engaged to marry Ruth Stein, his boss's daughter, but is ashamed of his parentage. Cominsky arrives at the engagement party, and Morris refuses to acknowledge his own father. Sammy, after winning the lightweight championship, faces up to his brother, denounces him, and drags him home. Morris, realizing his sin, begs and receives forgiveness. Cominsky acknowledges his gratitude to Sammy and gives his blessing to Sammy's Irish sweetheart, Mamie.

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GENRE
Genre:
Sub-genre:
Domestic


Subject

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.