Other Men's Daughters (1918)

Drama | 7 July 1918

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HISTORY

To underscore the theme of the film, the author, E. Lloyd Sheldon, suggested in the story included in the copyright descriptions that the film begin with the following words engraved on a rock or marble slab: "Do unto other men's daughters, as you would have done unto your own." ...

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To underscore the theme of the film, the author, E. Lloyd Sheldon, suggested in the story included in the copyright descriptions that the film begin with the following words engraved on a rock or marble slab: "Do unto other men's daughters, as you would have done unto your own."

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
ETR
22 Jun 1918
p. 152
ETR
13 Jul 1918
p. 475
MPN
13 Jul 1918
p. 256
MPW
16 Feb 1918
p. 1030
NYDM
20 Jul 1918
p. 89
Variety
26 Jul 1918
p. 30
Wid's
7 Jul 1918
pp. 5-6
DETAILS
Release Date:
7 July 1918
Production Date:

Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
William Fox
7 July 1918
LP12637
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in reels):
5
Country:
United States
SYNOPSIS

Shirley Reynolds returns home from boarding school to find that her mother, weary of her husband's philandering, has filed for divorce. Hoping to effect a reconciliation, Shirley visits her father's apartment, where she interrupts a riotous party held in honor of his new mistress, Lola Wayne. Shirley prevents Lola's outraged father from killing her own father, but later, Wayne decides to wreak his revenge through Shirley and hires the lecherous Trask to lure her to ruin. On a particular evening, Wayne persuades Shirley to visit Trask's disreputable roadhouse, where Lola has arranged to meet with Reynolds. Suspicious, Shirley's sweetheart, Richard Orsmby, follows her to the inn. Reynolds hears Shirley struggling with Trask behind a locked door but is unable to assist her until Richard arrives. Trask, in his struggle to escape the two men, leaps from a window to his death, after which Wayne takes Lola home. Shirley then convinces her mother to forgive her remorseful ...

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Shirley Reynolds returns home from boarding school to find that her mother, weary of her husband's philandering, has filed for divorce. Hoping to effect a reconciliation, Shirley visits her father's apartment, where she interrupts a riotous party held in honor of his new mistress, Lola Wayne. Shirley prevents Lola's outraged father from killing her own father, but later, Wayne decides to wreak his revenge through Shirley and hires the lecherous Trask to lure her to ruin. On a particular evening, Wayne persuades Shirley to visit Trask's disreputable roadhouse, where Lola has arranged to meet with Reynolds. Suspicious, Shirley's sweetheart, Richard Orsmby, follows her to the inn. Reynolds hears Shirley struggling with Trask behind a locked door but is unable to assist her until Richard arrives. Trask, in his struggle to escape the two men, leaps from a window to his death, after which Wayne takes Lola home. Shirley then convinces her mother to forgive her remorseful husband.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.