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HISTORY

The completion of principal photography at the Metro Pictures Corp. “winter studios” in Jacksonville, FL, was announced in the 17 March 1917 Moving Picture World. That same day, Motion Picture News reported that the company had returned to New York City after taking additional location shots in the Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina, where cameraman Herbert O. Carleton narrowly escaped death in a hotel fire.
       A Magdalene of the Hills was released on 16 April 1917, followed by a 22 April 1917 opening at Moore’s Garden Theatre in Washington, DC, and on 26 April 1917 at the Victoria Theatre in Philadelphia, PA. Some sources listed the title as A Magdalen of the Hills.
       The National Film Preservation Board (NFPB) included this film on its list of Lost U.S. Silent Feature Films as of February 2021.
...

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The completion of principal photography at the Metro Pictures Corp. “winter studios” in Jacksonville, FL, was announced in the 17 March 1917 Moving Picture World. That same day, Motion Picture News reported that the company had returned to New York City after taking additional location shots in the Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina, where cameraman Herbert O. Carleton narrowly escaped death in a hotel fire.
       A Magdalene of the Hills was released on 16 April 1917, followed by a 22 April 1917 opening at Moore’s Garden Theatre in Washington, DC, and on 26 April 1917 at the Victoria Theatre in Philadelphia, PA. Some sources listed the title as A Magdalen of the Hills.
       The National Film Preservation Board (NFPB) included this film on its list of Lost U.S. Silent Feature Films as of February 2021.

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Exhibitors Trade Review
28 Apr 1917
p. 1463
Jewish Exponent [Philadelphia, PA]
20 Apr 1917
p. 13
Motion Picture News
17 Mar 1917
p. 1682
Motion Picture News
28 Apr 1917
pp. 2688-2689
Motography
5 May 1917
pp. 962-963
Moving Picture World
17 Mar 1917
p. 1784
Moving Picture World
7 Apr 1917
p. 131
Moving Picture World
21 Apr 1917
p. 455
Moving Picture World
28 Apr 1917
p. 638
NYDM
28 Apr 1917
p. 32
Variety
20 Apr 1917
p. 26
Washington Times [Washington, DC]
18 Apr 1917
p. 19
Wid's Daily
19 Apr 1917
pp. 248-249
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
BRAND NAME
A Metro Wonderplay
A Metro Wonderplay
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
PRODUCER
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
A Magdalen of the Hills
Release Date:
16 April 1917
Premiere Information:
Washington, DC, opening: 22 Apr 1917; Philadelphia opening: 26 Jan 1917
Production Date:
ended late Feb/early Mar 1917
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Rolfe Photoplays, Inc.
18 April 1917
LP10586
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in reels):
5
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Young Eric Southard is sent to the mountain community of Hibbbitsville by Herbert Grayson, his lumber magnate uncle, to secure a tract of land owned by John Mathis, who blames Herbert for the death of his son. While in the timberlands, Eric falls in love with John’s daughter, Renie, and they are secretly married. Soon after the wedding, Eric is summoned home by his uncle and is injured in an automobile accident. Meanwhile, John tries to force Renie to marry mountaineer Bud Weaver, but she claims to be a modern Magdalene and is disowned by her father. Desperate for news on Eric’s condition, Renie visits Peets, the mill foreman. Peets attacks her and she kills him in self-defense. Renie is tried for murder but is saved by Eric, who successfully defends her in court. The tragedy awakens Herbert to the needs of his workers, and he inaugurates a new program for the benefit of the ...

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Young Eric Southard is sent to the mountain community of Hibbbitsville by Herbert Grayson, his lumber magnate uncle, to secure a tract of land owned by John Mathis, who blames Herbert for the death of his son. While in the timberlands, Eric falls in love with John’s daughter, Renie, and they are secretly married. Soon after the wedding, Eric is summoned home by his uncle and is injured in an automobile accident. Meanwhile, John tries to force Renie to marry mountaineer Bud Weaver, but she claims to be a modern Magdalene and is disowned by her father. Desperate for news on Eric’s condition, Renie visits Peets, the mill foreman. Peets attacks her and she kills him in self-defense. Renie is tried for murder but is saved by Eric, who successfully defends her in court. The tragedy awakens Herbert to the needs of his workers, and he inaugurates a new program for the benefit of the mountaineers.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.