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HISTORY

Three Weeks was the first and only film by Benjamin S. Moss’s Reliable Feature Film Corporation, according to the 23 Apr 1915 Variety. He soon formed a new company, the B. S. Moss Feature Film Corporation.
       A Reliable advertisement in the 17 Oct 1914 Variety billed the film as “a $50,000 production—280 scenes,” and “five reels of the most universally popular novel of the century—Elinor Glyn’s Imperishable Romance,” and assured that despite the novel’s notoriety, the film adaptation “delights all and offends none.” The 17 Oct 1914 Variety added further: “In adapting ‘Three Weeks’ for the screen, the scenario writer has eliminated all of the objectionable features of the story that caused so much discussion, but nevertheless has held sufficient of the original theme to make the film play an interesting dramatic incident.” The review noted that the film’s epilogue was taken from one of Elinor Glyn’s two sequel novels, High Noon or One Day. Glyn is probably best known for writing the novel It, which created Clara Bow’s fame as “The ‘It’ Girl” when she starred in the 1927 film adaptation (see entry).
       The older woman’s tiger skin rug seduction of the younger man was the most talked-about scene from both the book and the film, inspiring many jokes and parodies at the time. The notoriety of the novel itself was also good for a gag, as in the 1914 Keystone short comedy Fatty’s Jonah Day, in which Fatty Arbuckle is attacked by Mabel Normand’s father for sharing his copy of Three Weeks with her on a park bench. ...

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Three Weeks was the first and only film by Benjamin S. Moss’s Reliable Feature Film Corporation, according to the 23 Apr 1915 Variety. He soon formed a new company, the B. S. Moss Feature Film Corporation.
       A Reliable advertisement in the 17 Oct 1914 Variety billed the film as “a $50,000 production—280 scenes,” and “five reels of the most universally popular novel of the century—Elinor Glyn’s Imperishable Romance,” and assured that despite the novel’s notoriety, the film adaptation “delights all and offends none.” The 17 Oct 1914 Variety added further: “In adapting ‘Three Weeks’ for the screen, the scenario writer has eliminated all of the objectionable features of the story that caused so much discussion, but nevertheless has held sufficient of the original theme to make the film play an interesting dramatic incident.” The review noted that the film’s epilogue was taken from one of Elinor Glyn’s two sequel novels, High Noon or One Day. Glyn is probably best known for writing the novel It, which created Clara Bow’s fame as “The ‘It’ Girl” when she starred in the 1927 film adaptation (see entry).
       The older woman’s tiger skin rug seduction of the younger man was the most talked-about scene from both the book and the film, inspiring many jokes and parodies at the time. The notoriety of the novel itself was also good for a gag, as in the 1914 Keystone short comedy Fatty’s Jonah Day, in which Fatty Arbuckle is attacked by Mabel Normand’s father for sharing his copy of Three Weeks with her on a park bench. Fatty and Mabel escape by diving into a lake, then resume reading the book together on the opposite bank.
       The actor billed as T. Curran was also known as Thomas A. Curran.
       Goldwyn Pictures filmed another version of Three Weeks in 1924 (see entry).

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Motion Picture News
17 Oct 1914
p. 55
Motion Picture News
25 Oct 1914
p. 47
Motion Picture News
12 Jun 1915
p. 56
Motography
31 Oct 1914
p. 584
New York Clipper
17 Oct 1914
p. 14
NYDM
2 Oct 1915
pp. 89-90
Variety
26 Jun 1914
p. 18
Variety
17 Oct 1914
p. 15
Variety
23 Apr 1915
p. 17
DETAILS
Release Date:
8 October 1914
Production Date:

Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Benjamin S. Moss
2 January 1915
LU4202
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in reels):
5
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

In a prologue, Prince Alexis of the Balkan nation of Veseria, in order to save the life of his motherless son Paul, surrenders his throne to Nicholas the Usurper and goes to live in exile under an assumed name. Twenty-two years later, Nicholas’s dissolute son, King Stefan, now married to the popular Queen Sonia, is warned by his ministers that the people do not approve of his undignified behavior. When Stefan repulsively kisses Sonia, she goes into exile in Switzerland and writes that she will not return unless Stefan reforms. While staying in a hotel in Lucerne, Sonia meets and flirts with Paul Verdayne, a much younger aristocrat who knows her only as an exotic and mysterious “woman in black.” She makes her conquest by inviting Paul to her room, where she seduces him on a tiger skin rug. After her companion and nurse, Anna, suspects that Paul may be the Crown Prince of Veseria, Sonia confirms this by finding three moles on his arm. After three weeks, Sonia returns home when King Stefan falls ill. Learning of an intrigue to put a successor on the throne, Sonia vows that only a rightful heir, her own soon-to-be-born son, shall rule. After Sonia’s (and Paul’s) child is born, Stefan, suffering from brain fever, has her killed. Sonia’s faithful bodyguard Dimitri then kills Stefan. In an epilogue, Paul, years later, is an unknown onlooker at a cathedral, witnessing the church’s blessing on the young king. When the cathedral clears out, he kneels before the altar and prays for his son’s ...

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In a prologue, Prince Alexis of the Balkan nation of Veseria, in order to save the life of his motherless son Paul, surrenders his throne to Nicholas the Usurper and goes to live in exile under an assumed name. Twenty-two years later, Nicholas’s dissolute son, King Stefan, now married to the popular Queen Sonia, is warned by his ministers that the people do not approve of his undignified behavior. When Stefan repulsively kisses Sonia, she goes into exile in Switzerland and writes that she will not return unless Stefan reforms. While staying in a hotel in Lucerne, Sonia meets and flirts with Paul Verdayne, a much younger aristocrat who knows her only as an exotic and mysterious “woman in black.” She makes her conquest by inviting Paul to her room, where she seduces him on a tiger skin rug. After her companion and nurse, Anna, suspects that Paul may be the Crown Prince of Veseria, Sonia confirms this by finding three moles on his arm. After three weeks, Sonia returns home when King Stefan falls ill. Learning of an intrigue to put a successor on the throne, Sonia vows that only a rightful heir, her own soon-to-be-born son, shall rule. After Sonia’s (and Paul’s) child is born, Stefan, suffering from brain fever, has her killed. Sonia’s faithful bodyguard Dimitri then kills Stefan. In an epilogue, Paul, years later, is an unknown onlooker at a cathedral, witnessing the church’s blessing on the young king. When the cathedral clears out, he kneels before the altar and prays for his son’s welfare.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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