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HISTORY

New York was one of Broadway producer A. H. Woods' theatrical productions set to be adapted into film in an arrangement with Pathe Films, the 20 November 1915 Moving Picture World announced. George Fitzmaurice would direct most of them, and notable actors from the plays would be used when possible.
       The 22 January 1916 Motography reported that on the night of 3 January 1916, "with the assistance of A. H. Woods, the theatrical producer," as soon as the eleven o'clock stage show ended at New York City's Republic Theater, director Fitzmaurice, Fania Marinoff, John Miltern, "and many extras came in and took possession of the theater. Special lights were installed and some twenty scenes taken in jig time. In order to carry out the realism, the floor of the theater was crowded with extras and friends of various Pathe officials. Mr. Woods himself was present and gave many valuable hints as to detail."
       In his 19 February 1916 Motography review, George W. Graves referred to Fania Marinoff's character as "Rosa."
       Wid's praised the film, adding, "There were several views of New York at night which will be quite interesting throughout the country, and we had one very good scene of a typical New York midnight frolic entertainment. The death of Miss Marinoff was a genuine thrill, because the fall down the long stairway was particularly realistic and unusually well done."
       The National Film Preservation Board (NFPB) included this film on its list of Lost U.S. Silent Feature Films as of February 2021. ...

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New York was one of Broadway producer A. H. Woods' theatrical productions set to be adapted into film in an arrangement with Pathe Films, the 20 November 1915 Moving Picture World announced. George Fitzmaurice would direct most of them, and notable actors from the plays would be used when possible.
       The 22 January 1916 Motography reported that on the night of 3 January 1916, "with the assistance of A. H. Woods, the theatrical producer," as soon as the eleven o'clock stage show ended at New York City's Republic Theater, director Fitzmaurice, Fania Marinoff, John Miltern, "and many extras came in and took possession of the theater. Special lights were installed and some twenty scenes taken in jig time. In order to carry out the realism, the floor of the theater was crowded with extras and friends of various Pathe officials. Mr. Woods himself was present and gave many valuable hints as to detail."
       In his 19 February 1916 Motography review, George W. Graves referred to Fania Marinoff's character as "Rosa."
       Wid's praised the film, adding, "There were several views of New York at night which will be quite interesting throughout the country, and we had one very good scene of a typical New York midnight frolic entertainment. The death of Miss Marinoff was a genuine thrill, because the fall down the long stairway was particularly realistic and unusually well done."
       The National Film Preservation Board (NFPB) included this film on its list of Lost U.S. Silent Feature Films as of February 2021.

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Motion Picture News
29 Jan 1916
p. 331
Motion Picture News
19 Feb 1916
p. 1020
Motography
27 Nov 1915
p. 1129
Motography
22 Jan 1916
p. 199
Motography
19 Feb 1916
p. 422, 423
Motography
14 Jul 1917
p. 102
Moving Picture World
20 Nov 1915
p. 1467
Moving Picture World
19 Feb 1916
p. 1140
NYDM
15 Jan 1916
p. 25
NYDM
12 Feb 1916
p. 28
Variety
11 Feb 1916
p. 21
Wid's
10 Feb 1916
p. 117
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
BRAND NAME
Gold Rooster Plays
Gold Rooster Plays
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
PRODUCERS
WRITER
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play New York by William Hurlbut (New York, 17 Oct 1910).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
DETAILS
Release Date:
4 February 1916
Production Date:

Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Pathé Frères
8 February 1916
LU7590
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in reels):
5
Country:
United States
SYNOPSIS

Respected New York businessman Oliver King soon gets over his infatuation with Edna Macey, a chorus girl, but when she is killed falling down a set of stairs at a restaurant, he feels obliged to raise her son Wendell, whom he believes is his own. When Wendell grows up, he becomes a drug addict, and then, when he attacks Oliver's new wife Nora, she kills him in self defense. Unable to live with his son's murderer, Oliver leaves Nora. Soon afterward, Edna's mother comes to Oliver looking for money. When Oliver turns her down, Mrs. Macey tells him that Wendell was not really his son. She had hoped the news would distress him, but instead it thrills Oliver, who returns to Nora and is reconciled with ...

More Less

Respected New York businessman Oliver King soon gets over his infatuation with Edna Macey, a chorus girl, but when she is killed falling down a set of stairs at a restaurant, he feels obliged to raise her son Wendell, whom he believes is his own. When Wendell grows up, he becomes a drug addict, and then, when he attacks Oliver's new wife Nora, she kills him in self defense. Unable to live with his son's murderer, Oliver leaves Nora. Soon afterward, Edna's mother comes to Oliver looking for money. When Oliver turns her down, Mrs. Macey tells him that Wendell was not really his son. She had hoped the news would distress him, but instead it thrills Oliver, who returns to Nora and is reconciled with her.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.