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HISTORY

Essanay President George K. Spoor purchased the rights to The Prince of Graustark, a sequel to Graustark (see entry), Essanay's successful 1915 film, the 19 August 1916 Motion Picture News announced. Both Bryant Washburn and Ernest Maupain, who appeared in Graustark, returned in The Prince of Graustark but as different characters. In this film, "Prince Robin" is the son of "Grenfall Lorry" and "Princess Yetive" from that earlier film. Wid's pointed out in its review that a "short section of the former film is shown at one point, which sort of ties the two together." (It was a scene in which Francis X. Bushman and Beverly Bayne leave the altar after their marriage.) Fred E. Wright directed both movies, which were adapted from best-selling novels.
       According to the 9 September 1916 Motion Picture News, the company of players "returned from Starved Rock, Ill., where scenes were taken for...The Prince of Graustark. These exteriors, together with those taken on estates along Chicago's beautiful north shore, complete the out-of-door scenes. Miss Clayton, supposed to be pulled off a pier by a large fish, fell onto a sharp rock and was severely lacerated, but continued to play the scene." Starved Rock, now a state park, is a scenic wilderness area along the Illinois River.
       For a scene in which the hero and heroine are arrested for speeding in Paris, France, after an auto chase, twenty Chicago motorcycle policemen were used, the 14 October 1916 Moving Picture World reported.
       The 16 September 1916 Motography noted that filming had been completed.
       ...

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Essanay President George K. Spoor purchased the rights to The Prince of Graustark, a sequel to Graustark (see entry), Essanay's successful 1915 film, the 19 August 1916 Motion Picture News announced. Both Bryant Washburn and Ernest Maupain, who appeared in Graustark, returned in The Prince of Graustark but as different characters. In this film, "Prince Robin" is the son of "Grenfall Lorry" and "Princess Yetive" from that earlier film. Wid's pointed out in its review that a "short section of the former film is shown at one point, which sort of ties the two together." (It was a scene in which Francis X. Bushman and Beverly Bayne leave the altar after their marriage.) Fred E. Wright directed both movies, which were adapted from best-selling novels.
       According to the 9 September 1916 Motion Picture News, the company of players "returned from Starved Rock, Ill., where scenes were taken for...The Prince of Graustark. These exteriors, together with those taken on estates along Chicago's beautiful north shore, complete the out-of-door scenes. Miss Clayton, supposed to be pulled off a pier by a large fish, fell onto a sharp rock and was severely lacerated, but continued to play the scene." Starved Rock, now a state park, is a scenic wilderness area along the Illinois River.
       For a scene in which the hero and heroine are arrested for speeding in Paris, France, after an auto chase, twenty Chicago motorcycle policemen were used, the 14 October 1916 Moving Picture World reported.
       The 16 September 1916 Motography noted that filming had been completed.
       The 7 October 1916 Motography noted that The Prince of Graustark was the last film of Camille D'Arcy, who had a small role. The thirty-seven-year-old actress died 27 September 1916 of an infection.
       Reviews were favorable, even glowing. James S. McQuade, writing in the 21 October 1916 Moving Picture World, commented: "Owing to the remarkable likeness between the two girls ["Maud" and the "Princess of Dawsbergen"], the spectator will be as badly puzzled in following the story intelligently as was the prince in distinguishing one girl from the other, unless the subtitles and certain telegrams are attentively observed."
       According to the Library of Congress American Silent Feature Film Survival Database, this film is extant.

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Motion Picture News
19 Aug 1916
p. 1059
Motion Picture News
9 Sep 1916
p. 1536
Motion Picture News
28 Oct 1916
p. 2604
Motion Picture News
18 Nov 1916
p. 3171
Motography
16 Sep 1916
p. 666
Motography
7 Oct 1916
p. 843
Motography
18 Nov 1916
p. 1146, 1147
Motography
2 Dec 1916
p. 1258
Moving Picture World
14 Oct 1916
p. 267
Moving Picture World
21 Oct 1916
p. 377
Moving Picture World
28 Oct 1916
p. 607
Moving Picture World
4 Nov 1916
p. 667, 756
New York Clipper
8 Nov 1916
p. 34
NYDM
11 Nov 1916
p. 28
Variety
3 Nov 1916
p. 25
Wid's
28 Dec 1916
p. 1201
DETAILS
Release Date:
6 November 1916
Production Date:

Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Essanay Film Mfg. Co.
21 October 1916
LP9373
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
5,000
Length(in reels):
5
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Prince Robin of Graustark could save his principality from bankruptcy by marrying the Princess of Dawsbergen, but, to the displeasure of his advisors, he refuses because he has never met her. Then, determined to secure a $30 million loan for Graustark, he sails to the United States, where financier William W. Blithers agrees to provide the money. Eager to be related to royalty, Blithers also tries to arrange a marriage between his daughter Maud and the prince. Maud, however, is of the same mind as the prince, and rejects the match because she does not know him. Then, Robin, having already played tennis with Maud, falls in love with another woman he rescues from the water after a fishing accident, thinking she's Maud because she looks remarkably like her. Back in Graustark, he brings her to court and introduces her as his fiancée, after which he is astonished by the pleased smiles of his advisors, who inform him that the woman he believes to be a Blithers is really the Princess of Dawsbergen, who had been visiting friends in ...

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Prince Robin of Graustark could save his principality from bankruptcy by marrying the Princess of Dawsbergen, but, to the displeasure of his advisors, he refuses because he has never met her. Then, determined to secure a $30 million loan for Graustark, he sails to the United States, where financier William W. Blithers agrees to provide the money. Eager to be related to royalty, Blithers also tries to arrange a marriage between his daughter Maud and the prince. Maud, however, is of the same mind as the prince, and rejects the match because she does not know him. Then, Robin, having already played tennis with Maud, falls in love with another woman he rescues from the water after a fishing accident, thinking she's Maud because she looks remarkably like her. Back in Graustark, he brings her to court and introduces her as his fiancée, after which he is astonished by the pleased smiles of his advisors, who inform him that the woman he believes to be a Blithers is really the Princess of Dawsbergen, who had been visiting friends in America.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.