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HISTORY

This film was also known as Madame Du Barry, and was copyrighted under this title. According to the continuity included in the copyright descriptions, Alice Gale was going to play "Mother Savord." For information on other films based on the life of Madame Du Barry, see the above listing for the 1915 Kleine film Du Barry.
       The National Film Preservation Board (NFPB) included this film on its list of Lost U.S. Silent Feature Films as of February 2021. ...

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This film was also known as Madame Du Barry, and was copyrighted under this title. According to the continuity included in the copyright descriptions, Alice Gale was going to play "Mother Savord." For information on other films based on the life of Madame Du Barry, see the above listing for the 1915 Kleine film Du Barry.
       The National Film Preservation Board (NFPB) included this film on its list of Lost U.S. Silent Feature Films as of February 2021.

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
ETR
12 Jan 1918
p. 522
MPN
12 Jan 1918
p. 185
MPN
19 Jan 1918
p. 443
MPW
20 Mar 1915
p. 57
MPW
19 Jan 1918
p. 379
Wid's
31 Jan 1918
pp. 911-12
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Madame Du Barry
Release Date:
30 December 1917
Production Date:

Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
William Fox
30 December 1917
LP11926
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
SYNOPSIS

The beautiful Jeanette Du Barry attracts the attention of King Louis XV of France and later gains status in his court when her cousin, Jean Du Barry, marries her to the ungainly Count Guillaume Du Barry. The king chooses her as his favorite, and she is content with a shallow but glittering existence until she falls in love with Cossé-Brissac, a soldier. Jean, who bears ill will towards his cousin, attempts to expose the countess' affair with Brissac, but the king refuses to believe him and, in fact, banishes him from the court. With Louis' death and the subsequent outbreak of the French Revolution, Jean incites the mob against Madame Du Barry, and she is sentenced to the ...

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The beautiful Jeanette Du Barry attracts the attention of King Louis XV of France and later gains status in his court when her cousin, Jean Du Barry, marries her to the ungainly Count Guillaume Du Barry. The king chooses her as his favorite, and she is content with a shallow but glittering existence until she falls in love with Cossé-Brissac, a soldier. Jean, who bears ill will towards his cousin, attempts to expose the countess' affair with Brissac, but the king refuses to believe him and, in fact, banishes him from the court. With Louis' death and the subsequent outbreak of the French Revolution, Jean incites the mob against Madame Du Barry, and she is sentenced to the guillotine.

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GENRE
Genre:
Sub-genre:
Historical


Subject

Subject (Minor):
Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.