This Is Heaven (1929)

90 mins | Romantic comedy | 22 June 1929

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
31 Mar 1929.
---
New York Times
27 May 1929
p. 22.
Variety
3 Apr 1929
p. 23.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
PRODUCER
WRITERS
Dial and titles
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Dir of photog
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
MUSIC
Mus score
SOURCES
SONGS
"This Is Heaven," music by Harry Akst, lyrics by Jack Yellen.
DETAILS
Release Date:
22 June 1929
Copyright Claimant:
Samuel Goldwyn
Copyright Date:
15 June 1929
Copyright Number:
LP505
Physical Properties:
Silent with sound sequences
Talking seq, mus score, and sd eff by Movietone
Black and White
Sound, also silent
Also si; 7,859 ft.
Duration(in mins):
90
Length(in feet):
7,948
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

At Ellis Island in New York, Eva Petrie, a Hungarian immigrant, meets her uncle, Frank Chase, a subway motorman, and his daughter, Mamie, with whom she will reside in the Bronx. Mamie gets Eva a job as a cook and waitress at Child's Restaurant on Fifth Avenue, and tries, unsuccessfully, to interest her in wealthy men. Eva spots Jimmy on the subway one morning; he is wearing a chauffeur's cap, though he is actually a millionaire. Later, she is sent to preside over a griddle at a charity bazaar, where she becomes reacquainted with Jimmy--while pretending to be an exiled Russian princess. He realizes the deception and pretends to be a chauffeur. Eva and Jimmy, following a romantic courtship, are married, and she insists he go into the taxi business. Uncle Frank, however, gambles their last payment on a taxi, and Eva is forced to borrow money from Mamie's wealthy lover. Jimmy then drops the pretense, revealing his true position in life, and Eva realizes "this ees ... +


At Ellis Island in New York, Eva Petrie, a Hungarian immigrant, meets her uncle, Frank Chase, a subway motorman, and his daughter, Mamie, with whom she will reside in the Bronx. Mamie gets Eva a job as a cook and waitress at Child's Restaurant on Fifth Avenue, and tries, unsuccessfully, to interest her in wealthy men. Eva spots Jimmy on the subway one morning; he is wearing a chauffeur's cap, though he is actually a millionaire. Later, she is sent to preside over a griddle at a charity bazaar, where she becomes reacquainted with Jimmy--while pretending to be an exiled Russian princess. He realizes the deception and pretends to be a chauffeur. Eva and Jimmy, following a romantic courtship, are married, and she insists he go into the taxi business. Uncle Frank, however, gambles their last payment on a taxi, and Eva is forced to borrow money from Mamie's wealthy lover. Jimmy then drops the pretense, revealing his true position in life, and Eva realizes "this ees Heaven." +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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