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HISTORY

The 25 Aug 1917 Motion Picture News announced that actor Douglas Fairbanks, director Joseph Henabery, publicist Bennie Ziedman, and twenty others left Universal Studios the previous week for Evanston, WY, to film several locations over a period of roughly ten days for what appeared to be an untitled movie. Champion rodeo rider and roper J. H. Strickland would make his first screen appearance and return to Universal City, CA, with the film company as a permanent member. Three weeks later, the 15 Sep 1917 Motion Picture News reported that Henabery had completed the film, now called The Man From Painted Post, after a month in WY. The film was staged at the Riverside Ranch near Laramie, WY, "where 160,000 acres of land and 30,000 head of cattle were placed at the disposal of the players."
       The picture was originally titled Fancy Jim Sherwood. Victor Fleming received sole screen credit for the camera work, although the film is also listed among Harry Thorpe's credits in the 1921 MPSD. According to a news item, Joseph Henabery, assisted by Billy Shay, cut the film during a transcontinental trip by train from Los Angeles, CA, to New York. ...

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The 25 Aug 1917 Motion Picture News announced that actor Douglas Fairbanks, director Joseph Henabery, publicist Bennie Ziedman, and twenty others left Universal Studios the previous week for Evanston, WY, to film several locations over a period of roughly ten days for what appeared to be an untitled movie. Champion rodeo rider and roper J. H. Strickland would make his first screen appearance and return to Universal City, CA, with the film company as a permanent member. Three weeks later, the 15 Sep 1917 Motion Picture News reported that Henabery had completed the film, now called The Man From Painted Post, after a month in WY. The film was staged at the Riverside Ranch near Laramie, WY, "where 160,000 acres of land and 30,000 head of cattle were placed at the disposal of the players."
       The picture was originally titled Fancy Jim Sherwood. Victor Fleming received sole screen credit for the camera work, although the film is also listed among Harry Thorpe's credits in the 1921 MPSD. According to a news item, Joseph Henabery, assisted by Billy Shay, cut the film during a transcontinental trip by train from Los Angeles, CA, to New York.

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Motion Picture News
25 Aug 1917
p. 1310
Motion Picture News
15 Sep 1917
p. 1826
Motion Picture News
15 Feb 1919
p. 949
Motog
8 Sep 1917
p. 506
Motog
15 Sep 1917
p. 566
Motog
27 Oct 1917
p. 885
Moving Picture World
20 Oct 1917
p. 400
New York Times
1 Oct 1917
---
NYDM
15 Sep 1917
p. 26
NYDM
6 Oct 1917
p. 23
NYDM
13 Oct 1917
p. 18
Variety
5 Oct 1917
p. 41
Wid's
4 Oct 1917
p. 629
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
FILM EDITOR
Asst film ed
PRODUCTION MISC
Unit pub
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the short story "Silver Slippers" by Jackson Gregory in Adventure Magazine (Nov 1916).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Fancy Jim Sherwood
Release Date:
1 October 1917
Production Date:
Aug--early Sep 1917
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Artcraft Pictures Corp.
24 September 1917
LP11456
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in reels):
5
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Hired by the cattlemen's association to rid the range of cattle rustlers, detective "Fancy Jim" Sherwood arrives at Warren Bronson's V-Bar Ranch disguised as a dude. Jim quickly discovers that "Bull" Madden is behind the rustling. Both Madden and Jim are attracted to schoolteacher Jane Forbes, and when Madden kidnaps the girl, Jim drops his pretense and pursues the rustlers. After many exciting adventures, Jim arrests Madden and rescues ...

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Hired by the cattlemen's association to rid the range of cattle rustlers, detective "Fancy Jim" Sherwood arrives at Warren Bronson's V-Bar Ranch disguised as a dude. Jim quickly discovers that "Bull" Madden is behind the rustling. Both Madden and Jim are attracted to schoolteacher Jane Forbes, and when Madden kidnaps the girl, Jim drops his pretense and pursues the rustlers. After many exciting adventures, Jim arrests Madden and rescues Jane.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.