Move Over, Darling (1963)

103 mins | Comedy | 25 December 1963

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HISTORY

The 27 Mar 1963 DV announced the start of pre-production, with actress-singer Doris Day making wardrobe and makeup tests.
       The picture was a retitled version of Something’s Got to Give, begun the previous year. Actor Dean Martin quit the production in protest over the firing of co-star Marilyn Monroe, and her replacement by Lee Remick. The studio sued Martin, who responded with a $6 million countersuit, “charging defamation, conspiracy and breach of contract.” Monroe died shortly after her dismissal and the project remained in limbo for several months. On 5 Jun 1963, NYT reported that the parties abandoned their lawsuits. The 4 Apr 1963 DV noted that actor James Garner was cast as “Nick Arden” in both versions, but declined the earlier production to star in The Great Escape (1963, see entry).
       The 9 Jun 1963 NYT stated that the screenplay was revised to suit Doris Day’s wholesome image. The 29 Apr 1963 DV credited Harry Kurnitz as screenwriter; he was later replaced by Hal Kanter and Jack Sher. The 3 Apr 1963 DV included Ed Begley among the cast, but he did not appear in the completed film. The 2 Apr 1963 DV revealed that Day and her husband, producer Marty Melcher, intended to use their proceeds to compensate Columbia Pictures for an unfulfilled contract. Move Over, Darling was the first picture produced on the Twentieth Century-Fox studio lot since the previous summer.
       Principal photography began 13 May 1963, as stated in that day’s ... More Less

The 27 Mar 1963 DV announced the start of pre-production, with actress-singer Doris Day making wardrobe and makeup tests.
       The picture was a retitled version of Something’s Got to Give, begun the previous year. Actor Dean Martin quit the production in protest over the firing of co-star Marilyn Monroe, and her replacement by Lee Remick. The studio sued Martin, who responded with a $6 million countersuit, “charging defamation, conspiracy and breach of contract.” Monroe died shortly after her dismissal and the project remained in limbo for several months. On 5 Jun 1963, NYT reported that the parties abandoned their lawsuits. The 4 Apr 1963 DV noted that actor James Garner was cast as “Nick Arden” in both versions, but declined the earlier production to star in The Great Escape (1963, see entry).
       The 9 Jun 1963 NYT stated that the screenplay was revised to suit Doris Day’s wholesome image. The 29 Apr 1963 DV credited Harry Kurnitz as screenwriter; he was later replaced by Hal Kanter and Jack Sher. The 3 Apr 1963 DV included Ed Begley among the cast, but he did not appear in the completed film. The 2 Apr 1963 DV revealed that Day and her husband, producer Marty Melcher, intended to use their proceeds to compensate Columbia Pictures for an unfulfilled contract. Move Over, Darling was the first picture produced on the Twentieth Century-Fox studio lot since the previous summer.
       Principal photography began 13 May 1963, as stated in that day’s DV. The 30 Apr 1963 DV noted that production was scheduled to begin several weeks earlier, but was delayed when James Garner contracted chicken pox. Filming took place in West Los Angeles, CA, in and around the studio lot. The 26 Dec 1963 LAT identified locations as “Pico, Wilshire and Sunset Boulevards,” and J. W. Robinson’s department store.
       A news item in the 16 Jun 1963 LAT stated that director Michael Gordon completed a scene with child actresses Pami Lee and Leslie Farrell in only two takes. Gordon explained that he rehearsed the girls’ mothers, who passed the director’s instructions to their children. Doris Day revealed her secret for working with the child actors in the 25 Dec 1963 LAT, saying that she claimed to be hearing impaired, so the girls would speak clearly. The 29 Aug 1963 LAT credited Mike Donovan as the on-set lifeguard during a swimming pool scene. Donovan described the assignment as the easiest of his career, since James Garner taught Leslie Farrell “how to stay afloat,” and the remaining cast members were good swimmers.
       The 26 May 1963 LAT described a mishap on set, in which a “whistle blast” from an adjoining stage prematurely signaled a series of wind and rain effects that drenched Doris Day. Michael Gordon’s reaction to the costly error was reportedly unsuitable for print. Day later suffered a cracked rib during a staged fight with co-star Polly Bergen, as reported in the 12 Jul 1963 LAT . The injury occurred when Garner grabbed Day by her torso to pull the women apart. Day completed the picture wearing an elastic brace.
       A news item in the 3 May 1963 DV stated that a replica automated car wash was constructed on Stage 9 for a scene in which Doris Day was to be trapped inside during operation. Following an unsuccessful search for a lathering agent that would appear authentic on screen while not harming the actress’s skin, the producers settled for standard car-wash detergent. The scene was filmed last as a precaution, but after eight takes, there was no apparent damage to Ms. Day’s complexion.
       Principal photography was completed in late Jul 1963, according to a full-page statement from Day and Melcher in the 29 Jul 1963 DV. The 27 Dec 1963 LAT reported that, over the next several months, actress Thelma Ritter asked the producers to give her the glamorous wardrobe designed for her character. As a precedent for her request, Ritter noted that she was allowed to keep the blue jeans and torn short she wore in How the West Was Won (1963, see entry).
       On 15 Nov 1963, DV announced the 23 Dec 1963 premiere at the Vogue Theatre in Hollywood, CA. Proceeds benefitted the Los Angeles Press Club’s 8-Ball Welfare Foundation. The 12 Dec 1963 DV stated that the first to order tickets were film veterans Mary Pickford, Fred Astaire, and Leo McCarey. According to the 18 Dec 1963 DV, the “forecourt festivities” were broadcast on Los Angeles television station KCOP, with Johnny Grant as master of ceremonies. The picture opened Christmas Day 1963 in Los Angeles and New York City to somewhat positive reviews. Public response was enthusiastic, with the 29 Jan 1964 DV reporting earnings of nearly $494,000 during the first month of the film’s Chicago, IL, run. On 23 Feb 1964, LAT announced that a royal command performance in London, England, would occur the following day. Doris Day was nominated for a Golden Globe Award for Best Actress – Comedy or Musical. The picture received a Three Star Award from the Southern California Motion Picture Council, and a Golden Chair Award from the Los Angeles Home Furnishings Mart.
       Move Over, Darling marked the American film debut of German actress Barbara Bouchay, as noted in the 4 Jun 1963 LAT. Other castings included Joseph Mell and Mark Bailey (26 Jun 1963 DV), and John Harmon (27 Jun 1963 DV). Doris Day recorded two songs from the film, Move Over, Darling and Twinkle Lullaby, both produced by her son, Terry Melcher, for Columbia Records. A novelization of the screenplay was issued by Dell Publishing.
Remake of My Favorite Wife (R.K.O., 1940). More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
27 Mar 1963
p. 1.
Daily Variety
2 Apr 1963
p. 2.
Daily Variety
3 Apr 1963
p. 2.
Daily Variety
4 Apr 1963
p. 2.
Daily Variety
29 Apr 1963
p. 3.
Daily Variety
30 Apr 1963
p. 4.
Daily Variety
3 May 1963
p. 3.
Daily Variety
13 May 1963
p. 1.
Daily Variety
26 Jun 1963
p. 4.
Daily Variety
27 Jun 1963
p. 11.
Daily Variety
12 Jul 1963
p. 2.
Daily Variety
29 Jul 1963
p. 12.
Daily Variety
30 Aug 1963
p. 9.
Daily Variety
12 Nov 1963
p. 6.
Daily Variety
15 Nov 1963
p. 3.
Daily Variety
5 Dec 1963
p. 3.
Daily Variety
12 Dec 1963
p. 2.
Daily Variety
18 Dec 1963
p. 8.
Daily Variety
13 Jan 1964
p. 4.
Daily Variety
29 Jan 1964
p. 3.
Los Angeles Times
26 May 1963
Section B, p. 8.
Los Angeles Times
4 Jun 1963
Section C, p. 7.
Los Angeles Times
16 Jun 1963
Section B, p. 6.
Los Angeles Times
12 Jul 1963
p. 2.
Los Angeles Times
29 Aug 1963
Section I, p. 14.
Los Angeles Times
29 Nov 1963
Section C, p. 29.
Los Angeles Times
20 Dec 1963
Section D, p. 7.
Los Angeles Times
24 Dec 1963
Section B, p. 5.
Los Angeles Times
25 Dec 1963
Section E, p. 13.
Los Angeles Times
26 Dec 1963
Section C, p. 11.
Los Angeles Times
27 Dec 1963
Section C, p. 11.
Los Angeles Times
23 Feb 1964
Section C, p. 2.
Los Angeles Times
8 Nov 1964
Section K, p. 7.
New York Times
5 Jun 1963
p. 32.
New York Times
9 Jun 1963
p. 121.
New York Times
25 Dec 1963
p. 38.
New York Times
26 Dec 1963
p. 33.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
WRITERS
Scr
Orig story
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
COSTUMES
Cost des
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec photog eff
Spec photog eff
MAKEUP
Makeup
Miss Day's hairstyles
Hairstyles
Hairstyle supv
PRODUCTION MISC
Unit prod mgr
Scr supv
Dial coach
Gaffer
SOURCES
SONGS
"Twinkle Lullaby," words and music by Joe Lubin
"Move Over, Darling," words and music by Joe Lubin, Hal Kanter and Terry Melcher.
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Something's Got to Give
Release Date:
25 December 1963
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles premiere: 23 December 1963
Los Angeles and New York openings: 25 December 1963
Production Date:
13 May--late July 1963
Copyright Claimant:
Melcher--Arcola Productions
Copyright Date:
19 December 1963
Copyright Number:
LP27018
Physical Properties:
Sound
Westrex
Color
De Luxe
Widescreen/ratio
CinemaScope
Duration(in mins):
103
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Ellen Arden is rescued from a South Seas island and brought back to the United States 5 years after she disappeared in an airplane crash. On the same day, her husband, Nick, is in court to hear Judge Bryson declare Ellen legally dead. Nick then marries beautiful but dumb Bianca Steele, and they go to a resort hotel for their honeymoon. Meanwhile, Ellen returns home and is distressed when her two children fail to recognize her. Learning from Nick's mother that he has just remarried, Ellen proceeds to the honeymoon hotel, where Nick immediately catches a glimpse of her. Still in love with Ellen, Nick feigns a back injury and returns home with Bianca. Ellen flies home and arrives ahead of the newlyweds, pretending to be Nick's masseuse. Nick learns that a man was also stranded with Ellen, but she describes him as small and unappealing. Unknown to Ellen, Nick goes to see this man, who is actually a handsome athlete, while Ellen hires a meek shoeclerk to impersonate him. Afterwards, Nick listens to the story told by Ellen and the shoeclerk but reveals that he knows the truth. Enraged, Ellen rushes home, with Nick in pursuit. Bianca is there, and Nick confesses that Ellen is his wife as detectives enter to arrest him for bigamy, a charge brought by his mother. Judge Bryson annuls Nick and Bianca's marriage, but when Ellen's real island companion arrives to identify her so that she can be declared legally alive, she becomes flustered and Nick storms off in a jealous rage. Later, at home, Ellen is about to tell the children that she is their mother when she learns that Nick has ... +


Ellen Arden is rescued from a South Seas island and brought back to the United States 5 years after she disappeared in an airplane crash. On the same day, her husband, Nick, is in court to hear Judge Bryson declare Ellen legally dead. Nick then marries beautiful but dumb Bianca Steele, and they go to a resort hotel for their honeymoon. Meanwhile, Ellen returns home and is distressed when her two children fail to recognize her. Learning from Nick's mother that he has just remarried, Ellen proceeds to the honeymoon hotel, where Nick immediately catches a glimpse of her. Still in love with Ellen, Nick feigns a back injury and returns home with Bianca. Ellen flies home and arrives ahead of the newlyweds, pretending to be Nick's masseuse. Nick learns that a man was also stranded with Ellen, but she describes him as small and unappealing. Unknown to Ellen, Nick goes to see this man, who is actually a handsome athlete, while Ellen hires a meek shoeclerk to impersonate him. Afterwards, Nick listens to the story told by Ellen and the shoeclerk but reveals that he knows the truth. Enraged, Ellen rushes home, with Nick in pursuit. Bianca is there, and Nick confesses that Ellen is his wife as detectives enter to arrest him for bigamy, a charge brought by his mother. Judge Bryson annuls Nick and Bianca's marriage, but when Ellen's real island companion arrives to identify her so that she can be declared legally alive, she becomes flustered and Nick storms off in a jealous rage. Later, at home, Ellen is about to tell the children that she is their mother when she learns that Nick has already informed them. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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