Angel in My Pocket (1969)

G | 105 mins | Comedy-drama | 7 February 1969

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HISTORY

On 31 Jan 1968, Var announced that Andy Griffith had signed a multi-film deal with Universal Pictures, the first of which would be Angel in My Pocket. Griffith’s move to motion pictures coincided with the end of his popular television situational comedy, The Andy Griffith Show (CBS, 3 Oct 1960—1 Apr 1968), with production scheduled to begin as soon as the series wrapped in the spring. A 1 Feb 1968 DV brief suggested that Juliet Prowse was considered for a supporting role, but she does not appear in the film.
       After minor delays, the 23 Apr 1968 DV reported that principal photography had begun the previous day. According to the 21 Aug 1968 edition, actor Gary Collins suffered a “run-in with shrubbery,” incurring an eye injury that delayed completion of his scenes. On 16 Sep 1968, DV brief announced that filming had recently concluded.
       Angel in My Pocket was among the first group of thirty films to receive an official rating from the Motion Picture Association of America’s (MPAA) newly established classification code. The film was rated “G,” which signified its content was “Suggested for all audiences.”
       According to the 11 Dec 1968 Var and 16 Jan 1969 DV, a special showing was held for the Board of Governors of the Girl Scouts of America in late 1968, followed by 25 Feb 1969 screening at the twelfth annual Show-A-Rama in Kansas City, MO. A 20 Jan 1969 DV item stated that Angel in my Pocket was scheduled for four regional premieres beginning with a 7 Feb ... More Less

On 31 Jan 1968, Var announced that Andy Griffith had signed a multi-film deal with Universal Pictures, the first of which would be Angel in My Pocket. Griffith’s move to motion pictures coincided with the end of his popular television situational comedy, The Andy Griffith Show (CBS, 3 Oct 1960—1 Apr 1968), with production scheduled to begin as soon as the series wrapped in the spring. A 1 Feb 1968 DV brief suggested that Juliet Prowse was considered for a supporting role, but she does not appear in the film.
       After minor delays, the 23 Apr 1968 DV reported that principal photography had begun the previous day. According to the 21 Aug 1968 edition, actor Gary Collins suffered a “run-in with shrubbery,” incurring an eye injury that delayed completion of his scenes. On 16 Sep 1968, DV brief announced that filming had recently concluded.
       Angel in My Pocket was among the first group of thirty films to receive an official rating from the Motion Picture Association of America’s (MPAA) newly established classification code. The film was rated “G,” which signified its content was “Suggested for all audiences.”
       According to the 11 Dec 1968 Var and 16 Jan 1969 DV, a special showing was held for the Board of Governors of the Girl Scouts of America in late 1968, followed by 25 Feb 1969 screening at the twelfth annual Show-A-Rama in Kansas City, MO. A 20 Jan 1969 DV item stated that Angel in my Pocket was scheduled for four regional premieres beginning with a 7 Feb 1969 event at the Roxy Theatre in Atlanta, GA. The 29 Jan 1969 DV reported that Griffith would participate in a two-week, nine-city promotional tour across the Southern U.S. According to the 21 Mar 1969 LAT, the West Coast engagement began 26 Mar 1969 in several Los Angeles, CA, area theaters and drive-ins. The New York City release followed on 2 Apr 1969, and the 16 Apr 1969 Var listed one-week earnings of $132,075 from thirty-six venues.
       Following the film’s tepid reception, rumors circulated that Griffith would reteam with his sitcom co-star, Don Knotts, for the second picture of his Universal deal. However, a 12 Sep 1969 DV story announced his return to television with a new CBS comedy series, Headmaster (18 Sep 1970—1 Jan 1971). More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
1 Feb 1968
p. 2.
Daily Variety
15 Mar 1968
p. 21.
Daily Variety
23 Apr 1968
p. 12.
Daily Variety
21 Aug 1968
p. 2.
Daily Variety
16 Sep 1968
p. 2.
Daily Variety
16 Jan 1969
p. 6.
Daily Variety
20 Jan 1969
p. 12.
Daily Variety
29 Jan 1969
p. 16.
Daily Variety
12 Sep 1969
p. 1.
Los Angeles Times
19 Apr 1968
Section D, p. 19.
Los Angeles Times
1 Nov 1968
Section F, p. 17.
Los Angeles Times
21 Mar 1969
Section H, p. 18.
Los Angeles Times
27 Mar 1969
Section I, p. 16.
New York Times
3 Apr 1969
p. 50.
Variety
31 Jan 1968
p. 3.
Variety
4 Dec 1968
p. 6.
Variety
11 Dec 1968
p. 22.
Variety
16 Apr 1969
p. 9.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
COSTUMES
Cost
MUSIC
MAKEUP
Makeup
Hairstyles
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
Asst to the prod
SOURCES
SONGS
"The Girls of All Nations," words and music by Jerry Keller and Dave Blume.
DETAILS
Release Date:
7 February 1969
Premiere Information:
Atlanta opening: 7 February 1969
Los Angeles opening: 26 March 1969
New York opening: 2 April 1969
Production Date:
22 April--early September 1968
Copyright Claimant:
Universal Pictures
Copyright Date:
29 March 1969
Copyright Number:
LP36744
Physical Properties:
Sound
Westrex Recording System
Color
Technicolor
Widescreen/ratio
Techniscope
Duration(in mins):
105
MPAA Rating:
G
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Samuel D. Whitehead, a newly ordained minister who put himself through seminary school by working in a brickyard, is assigned to his first parish in the small town of Wood Falls, Kansas. For years, the town has been beset by the endless bickering of the two founding families, the Sinclairs and the Greshams, and the church has had seven other ministers in the past decade. Upon arriving with his pregnant wife, Mary Elizabeth, his three small children, his complaining mother-in-law, Racine, and his shiftless brother-in-law Bubba, Sam's troubles begin immediately. First, he becomes involved in a sidewalk political brawl between the supporters of Mayor Will Sinclair and his opponent, Axel Gresham. Next, his visit to a burlesque house to arrange for the donation of its unused organ to the church is misinterpreted, and, finally, he performs the marriage ceremony for Lila Sinclair and Norman Gresham, a middle-aged couple who have kept their love a secret for 25 years because of their feuding families. Although Sam plans to keep the wedding a secret, it becomes public knowledge when Bubba and the parsonage caretaker, Calvin Grey, spike the church social punch with liquor made in the basement, and the normally shy Lila blurts out the news. After Will Sinclair and Axel Gresham arrange for Sam to be removed, Sam persuades a young lawyer, Art Shields, to run for mayor. The parades of all three candidates meet on the main street, and the ensuing chaos ends when the distillery explodes, setting the church on fire. As word arrives that Shields has won the election, Sam leaves town with his family, but his car is stopped by a procession led by Sinclair and ... +


Samuel D. Whitehead, a newly ordained minister who put himself through seminary school by working in a brickyard, is assigned to his first parish in the small town of Wood Falls, Kansas. For years, the town has been beset by the endless bickering of the two founding families, the Sinclairs and the Greshams, and the church has had seven other ministers in the past decade. Upon arriving with his pregnant wife, Mary Elizabeth, his three small children, his complaining mother-in-law, Racine, and his shiftless brother-in-law Bubba, Sam's troubles begin immediately. First, he becomes involved in a sidewalk political brawl between the supporters of Mayor Will Sinclair and his opponent, Axel Gresham. Next, his visit to a burlesque house to arrange for the donation of its unused organ to the church is misinterpreted, and, finally, he performs the marriage ceremony for Lila Sinclair and Norman Gresham, a middle-aged couple who have kept their love a secret for 25 years because of their feuding families. Although Sam plans to keep the wedding a secret, it becomes public knowledge when Bubba and the parsonage caretaker, Calvin Grey, spike the church social punch with liquor made in the basement, and the normally shy Lila blurts out the news. After Will Sinclair and Axel Gresham arrange for Sam to be removed, Sam persuades a young lawyer, Art Shields, to run for mayor. The parades of all three candidates meet on the main street, and the ensuing chaos ends when the distillery explodes, setting the church on fire. As word arrives that Shields has won the election, Sam leaves town with his family, but his car is stopped by a procession led by Sinclair and Gresham. Reconciled and united by their defeat in the mayoral race, they are going to build a new church, and they ask Sam to remain as pastor. Mary Elizabeth announces that she is about to give birth to her fourth child, and Sam shouts his acceptance, turning his car back toward Wood Falls. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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