Paradise Alley (1962)

81 mins | Comedy-drama | 1962

Director:

Hugo Haas

Writer:

Hugo Haas

Producer:

Hugo Haas

Production Company:

Sutton Pictures
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HISTORY

The 7 Aug 1957 DV announced that Carol Morris, “Miss Universe of 1957,” declined a role in Rescue at Sea, later released as Crash Landing (1958, see entry), and joined the cast of actor-filmmaker Hugo Haas’s next project, originally titled Stars in the Backyard. Joining her was television actor Don Sullivan. Principal photography began 26 Sep 1957, as noted in 27 Sep 1957 DV production charts. The 30 Sep 1957 DV stated that filming took place at Hal Roach Studios in Culver City, CA. On 21 Oct 1957, DV mentioned that actress Marie Windsor had recently completed her role.
       A news item in the 9 Dec 1957 DV noted that a sneak preview was held at the Fine Arts Theater in Beverly Hills, CA. Carol Morris was reportedly “mobbed” by admirers afterward.
       Three months later, the film premiered 4 Mar 1958 at the same venue, according to the 3 Mar 1958 LAT. Proceeds benefitted the Harlan Shoemaker Clinic. “Numerous stars” had reportedly purchased tickets. The 4 Mar 1958 DV claimed it was the first picture ever to premiere without distribution. More than seven months later, the 14 Oct 1958 DV announced another premiere on 25 Nov 1958 at the Fox Wilshire Theater in Beverly Hills. The master of ceremonies was veteran actor-singer George Jessel, who included portions of the event on his television program for KCOP in Los Angeles, CA. On 19 Nov 1958, DV reported that “glamour starlets,” stationed outside the theater, ... More Less

The 7 Aug 1957 DV announced that Carol Morris, “Miss Universe of 1957,” declined a role in Rescue at Sea, later released as Crash Landing (1958, see entry), and joined the cast of actor-filmmaker Hugo Haas’s next project, originally titled Stars in the Backyard. Joining her was television actor Don Sullivan. Principal photography began 26 Sep 1957, as noted in 27 Sep 1957 DV production charts. The 30 Sep 1957 DV stated that filming took place at Hal Roach Studios in Culver City, CA. On 21 Oct 1957, DV mentioned that actress Marie Windsor had recently completed her role.
       A news item in the 9 Dec 1957 DV noted that a sneak preview was held at the Fine Arts Theater in Beverly Hills, CA. Carol Morris was reportedly “mobbed” by admirers afterward.
       Three months later, the film premiered 4 Mar 1958 at the same venue, according to the 3 Mar 1958 LAT. Proceeds benefitted the Harlan Shoemaker Clinic. “Numerous stars” had reportedly purchased tickets. The 4 Mar 1958 DV claimed it was the first picture ever to premiere without distribution. More than seven months later, the 14 Oct 1958 DV announced another premiere on 25 Nov 1958 at the Fox Wilshire Theater in Beverly Hills. The master of ceremonies was veteran actor-singer George Jessel, who included portions of the event on his television program for KCOP in Los Angeles, CA. On 19 Nov 1958, DV reported that “glamour starlets,” stationed outside the theater, would begin selling tickets for the premiere the following night. The 25 Nov 1958 DV noted that the event preempted a screening of Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1958, see entry), which had been playing there for thirteen weeks. Three days later, the 28 Nov 1958 DV announced that KCOP commentator Tom Duggan, who also appeared in the picture, was fired from the station. The dismissal was prompted by Duggan’s disparaging on-air statements about Hugo Haas and George Jessel. Duggan, known for his reactionary views, claimed to be more authentically American than Jessel, who was allegedly loyal to Israel.
       On 27 Dec 1961, DV reported that the picture, re-titled Paradise Alley, was among seventeen independent features financed in part by Pathe-America. The 9 May 1962 Var noted that it was playing that week in Chicago, IL, on a double bill with Devil’s Eye (1961, see entry). Weeks later, the 27 Jun 1962 NYT stated that Pathe-America was acquired by Astor Pictures, which took over distribution of the film.
       Casting notices included Pat Goldin and Jane Betts (3 Oct 1957 DV), and Lesley Lorraine Pam, infant daughter of the film’s publicist, Jerry Pam (26 Sep 1957 DV). Paradise Alley marked the first screen appearance by actress Corinne Griffith since 1932.
The 7 Aug 1957 DV announced that Carol Morris, “Miss Universe of 1957,” declined a role in Rescue at Sea, later released as Crash Landing (1958, see entry), and joined the cast of actor-filmmaker Hugo Haas’s next project, originally titled Stars in the Backyard. Joining her was television actor Don Sullivan. Principal photography began 26 Sep 1957, as noted in 27 Sep 1957 DV production charts. The 30 Sep 1957 DV stated that filming took place at Hal Roach Studios in Culver City, CA. On 21 Oct 1957, DV mentioned that actress Marie Windsor had recently completed her role.
       A news item in the 9 Dec 1957 DV noted that a sneak preview was held at the Fine Arts Theater in Beverly Hills, CA. Carol Morris was reportedly “mobbed” by admirers afterward.
       Three months later, the film premiered 4 Mar 1958 at the same venue, according to the 3 Mar 1958 LAT. Proceeds benefitted the Harlan Shoemaker Clinic. “Numerous stars” had reportedly purchased tickets. The 4 Mar 1958 DV claimed it was the first picture ever to premiere without distribution. More than seven months later, the 14 Oct 1958 DV announced another premiere on 25 Nov 1958 at the Fox Wilshire Theater in Beverly Hills. The master of ceremonies was veteran actor-singer George Jessel, who included portions of the event on his television program for KCOP in Los Angeles, CA. On 19 Nov 1958, DV reported that “glamour starlets,” stationed outside the theater, would begin selling tickets for the premiere the following night. The 25 Nov 1958 DV noted that the event preempted a screening of Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1958, see entry), which had been playing there for thirteen weeks. Three days later, the 28 Nov 1958 DV announced that KCOP commentator Tom Duggan, who also appeared in the picture, was fired from the station. The dismissal was prompted by Duggan’s disparaging on-air statements about Hugo Haas and George Jessel. Duggan, known for his reactionary views, claimed to be more authentically American than Jessel, who was allegedly loyal to Israel.
       On 27 Dec 1961, DV reported that the picture, re-titled Paradise Alley, was among seventeen independent features financed in part by Pathe-America. The 9 May 1962 Var noted that it was playing that week in Chicago, IL, on a double bill with Devil’s Eye (1961, see entry). Weeks later, the 27 Jun 1962 NYT stated that Pathe-America was acquired by Astor Pictures, which took over distribution of the film.
       Casting notices included Pat Goldin and Jane Betts (3 Oct 1957 DV), and Lesley Lorraine Pam, infant daughter of the film’s publicist, Jerry Pam (26 Sep 1957 DV). Paradise Alley marked the first screen appearance by actress Corinne Griffith since 1932.
More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
7 Aug 1957
p. 3.
Daily Variety
10 Sep 1957
p. 3.
Daily Variety
26 Sep 1957
p. 7.
Daily Variety
27 Sep 1957
p. 15.
Daily Variety
30 Sep 1957
p. 9.
Daily Variety
3 Oct 1957
p. 5.
Daily Variety
21 Oct 1957
p. 3.
Daily Variety
9 Dec 1957
p. 2.
Daily Variety
4 Mar 1958
p. 2.
Daily Variety
14 Oct 1958
p. 7.
Daily Variety
19 Nov 1958
p. 2.
Daily Variety
24 Nov 1958
p. 10.
Daily Variety
25 Nov 1958
p. 3.
Daily Variety
28 Nov 1958
p. 1, 3.
Los Angeles Times
28 Feb 1958
Section A, p. 5.
Los Angeles Times
3 Mar 1958
Section B, p. 6.
New York Times
27 Jun 1962
p. 40.
Variety
27 Dec 1961
p. 3.
Variety
9 May 1962
p. 9.
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Stars in the Backyard
Release Date:
1962
Premiere Information:
Beverly Hills premiere: 4 March 1958
Marchyland license: 15 February 1962
Production Date:
26 September--late October 1957
Duration(in mins):
81
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

A once-great European film director moves into a seedy boarding house in Paradise Alley, a rundown section of Los Angeles. The boarders, who include the teenaged children of quarreling parents, an unwed mother, a stripper, a landlady, and the local busybody, all have their personal problems, and the ex-director sets out to prove that, in spite of the day-to-day bickerings, each of them is basically kind. With the aid of a former motion picture cameraman, the director announces he is shooting a film and asks for volunteers from the boarders; unknown to them, the movie does not exist--there is no film in the camera. Central Casting then calls on the director to accept a bit part in a movie, and when the director reveals his plan to the head of Central Casting, the latter supplies him with means to make an actual movie featuring the people of Paradise ... +


A once-great European film director moves into a seedy boarding house in Paradise Alley, a rundown section of Los Angeles. The boarders, who include the teenaged children of quarreling parents, an unwed mother, a stripper, a landlady, and the local busybody, all have their personal problems, and the ex-director sets out to prove that, in spite of the day-to-day bickerings, each of them is basically kind. With the aid of a former motion picture cameraman, the director announces he is shooting a film and asks for volunteers from the boarders; unknown to them, the movie does not exist--there is no film in the camera. Central Casting then calls on the director to accept a bit part in a movie, and when the director reveals his plan to the head of Central Casting, the latter supplies him with means to make an actual movie featuring the people of Paradise Alley. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.