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HISTORY

Originally released as a 23-chapter serial in 1914 and 1915, the picture was edited, and re-issued with new titles by the Randolph Film Corp. as a state rights feature in 1918. Some of the 23 episodes were copyrighted in 1914. One review credited Philip Lonergan rather than Lloyd Lonergan with the scenario. Although Harold MacGrath's story was also credited as the basis of the 1927 Trem Carr Production Million Dollar Mystery (see entry), directed by Charles J. Hunt and starring James Kirkwood and Lila Lee, the plot of that film differs greatly from the 1914 serial and 1918 feature. ...

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Originally released as a 23-chapter serial in 1914 and 1915, the picture was edited, and re-issued with new titles by the Randolph Film Corp. as a state rights feature in 1918. Some of the 23 episodes were copyrighted in 1914. One review credited Philip Lonergan rather than Lloyd Lonergan with the scenario. Although Harold MacGrath's story was also credited as the basis of the 1927 Trem Carr Production Million Dollar Mystery (see entry), directed by Charles J. Hunt and starring James Kirkwood and Lila Lee, the plot of that film differs greatly from the 1914 serial and 1918 feature.

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
ETR
8 Jun 1918
p. 51
MPN
8 Jun 1918
p. 3455
MPW
11 May 1918
p. 880
MPW
8 Jun 1918
pp. 1473-74
MPW
29 Jun 1918
p. 1895
DETAILS
Release Date:
June 1918
Production Date:

Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in reels):
6
Country:
United States
SYNOPSIS

In his youth, John Hargreaves joins the Black Hundred, a Russian secret service organization, but later he abandons the group, moves to the United States, and earns a fortune. To protect his little daughter Florence, he places her in a boarding school but sends for her when she reaches the age of seventeen. When Hargreaves learns that several Black Hundred agents are after him, he withdraws a million dollars from various banks and prepares to flee. The Russian agents, led by Countess Olga, decide to secure the money, and to this end, they kidnap and threaten Florence. In the end, however, she is saved by newspaper reporter Jim Norton, who helps to round up the gang and reunites Florence with her ...

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In his youth, John Hargreaves joins the Black Hundred, a Russian secret service organization, but later he abandons the group, moves to the United States, and earns a fortune. To protect his little daughter Florence, he places her in a boarding school but sends for her when she reaches the age of seventeen. When Hargreaves learns that several Black Hundred agents are after him, he withdraws a million dollars from various banks and prepares to flee. The Russian agents, led by Countess Olga, decide to secure the money, and to this end, they kidnap and threaten Florence. In the end, however, she is saved by newspaper reporter Jim Norton, who helps to round up the gang and reunites Florence with her father.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.