Hi, Mom! (1970)

87 mins | Comedy-drama | 27 April 1970

Director:

Brian De Palma

Producer:

Charles Hirsch

Cinematographer:

Robert Elfstrom

Editor:

Paul Hirsch

Production Designer:

Peter Bocour

Production Company:

West End Films
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HISTORY

The 1 Jan 1969 Var announced that director Brian De Palma and producer Charles Hirsch were preparing a sequel to their 1968 film, Greetings (see entry), the screen debut of actor Robert De Niro. The project was given the working title, Son of Greetings. On 26 Nov 1969, Var reported that the film, officially titled Hi, Mom! was completed at a cost of slightly more than $100,000, and was in the final stage of editing. The plot focused on a character from the previous film named “Jon Rubin”(played by De Niro), and his political evolution from reactionary to radical. The 15 Dec 1969 DV claimed the picture was “SUPER X-rated.”
       Hi, Mom! opened 27 Apr 1970 in New York City, and 24 Jun 1970 in Los Angeles, CA. Although reviews were mixed, critics commended De Palma on his aptitude for satire.
       Unidentified sources state that the "N.I.T. Journal" sequence filmed in ... More Less

The 1 Jan 1969 Var announced that director Brian De Palma and producer Charles Hirsch were preparing a sequel to their 1968 film, Greetings (see entry), the screen debut of actor Robert De Niro. The project was given the working title, Son of Greetings. On 26 Nov 1969, Var reported that the film, officially titled Hi, Mom! was completed at a cost of slightly more than $100,000, and was in the final stage of editing. The plot focused on a character from the previous film named “Jon Rubin”(played by De Niro), and his political evolution from reactionary to radical. The 15 Dec 1969 DV claimed the picture was “SUPER X-rated.”
       Hi, Mom! opened 27 Apr 1970 in New York City, and 24 Jun 1970 in Los Angeles, CA. Although reviews were mixed, critics commended De Palma on his aptitude for satire.
       Unidentified sources state that the "N.I.T. Journal" sequence filmed in 16mm. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
15 Dec 1969
p. 2.
Daily Variety
3 Apr 1970
p. 3, 17.
Los Angeles Times
26 Apr 1970
pp. 21-22.
Los Angeles Times
16 Jun 1970
Section G, p. 16.
Los Angeles Times
25 Jun 1970
Section E, p. 18.
New York Times
24 Jan 1970
p. 23.
New York Times
28 Apr 1970
p. 50.
New York Times
14 Jun 1970
p. 1, 34.
Variety
1 Jan 1969
p. 23.
Variety
26 Nov 1969
p. 6.
Variety
15 Apr 1970
p. 20.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
MUSIC
Mus comp & cond
SOURCES
SONGS
"I'm Looking at You," "Be Black Baby!" and "Hi, Mom!" music and lyrics by Eric Kaz and John Andreolli.
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Son of Greetings
Release Date:
27 April 1970
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 27 April 1970
Los Angeles opening: 24 June 1970
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
with b&w seq; Eastman Color
Lenses/Prints
Print by Movielab
Duration(in mins):
87
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Employed by pornographic filmmaker Joe Banner, Vietnam veteran Jon Rubin rents a room in New York's Lower East Side and trains his lens on the bedroom windows of a high rise. Among his subjects are a playboy, revolutionary Gerrit Wood, a middle class couple with two children, and a trio of single girls, including Judy Bishop, whom Rubin decides to seduce. Setting his site on her bedroom window, he proceeds to her apartment, where they begin to have sex. During their lovemaking, however, the camera tilts and fails to catch the precious moment, thereby ending Rubin's career as a photographer. Auditioning for the revue Be Black, Baby! the veteran wins the role of a white policeman. During the performance's filming by National Intellectual Television Journal, the actors appear in whiteface and blacken the countenances of their Caucasian audience. The cast then subjects the spectators to physical and verbal abuse. As the liberal audience expresses its approval to newsmen, the blacks, led by Wood, raid the high rise. They are repulsed by the bourgeois husband, who sprays them with machine gun fire. After marrying Judy, Rubin finds a job as an insurance salesman. Disgusted by a diet of TV dinners and tiring of his pregnant wife's demand for a yellow dishwasher, Rubin goes to the basement laundry and deposits dynamite in the washer. Interviewed by a news commentator before the devastated building, the veteran decries ... +


Employed by pornographic filmmaker Joe Banner, Vietnam veteran Jon Rubin rents a room in New York's Lower East Side and trains his lens on the bedroom windows of a high rise. Among his subjects are a playboy, revolutionary Gerrit Wood, a middle class couple with two children, and a trio of single girls, including Judy Bishop, whom Rubin decides to seduce. Setting his site on her bedroom window, he proceeds to her apartment, where they begin to have sex. During their lovemaking, however, the camera tilts and fails to catch the precious moment, thereby ending Rubin's career as a photographer. Auditioning for the revue Be Black, Baby! the veteran wins the role of a white policeman. During the performance's filming by National Intellectual Television Journal, the actors appear in whiteface and blacken the countenances of their Caucasian audience. The cast then subjects the spectators to physical and verbal abuse. As the liberal audience expresses its approval to newsmen, the blacks, led by Wood, raid the high rise. They are repulsed by the bourgeois husband, who sprays them with machine gun fire. After marrying Judy, Rubin finds a job as an insurance salesman. Disgusted by a diet of TV dinners and tiring of his pregnant wife's demand for a yellow dishwasher, Rubin goes to the basement laundry and deposits dynamite in the washer. Interviewed by a news commentator before the devastated building, the veteran decries violence. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.