The Rare Breed (1966)

97 mins | Western | 16 February 1966

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HISTORY

The 15 Jan 1964 LAT reported that The Rare Breed was among seventeen upcoming Universal Pictures productions based on original stories. A news item in the 27 Nov 1964 DV stated that actress Hayley Mills was set to co-star with Maureen O’Hara and James Stewart. On 13 Jan 1967, LAT announced that Juliet Mills, Hayley’s sister, would assume the role. The 4 Feb 1965 DV revealed that Russell Alquist, husband of Juliet Mills, composed what he hoped would be the picture’s title song. According to the 22 Dec 1964 DV, actor Lee Marvin was also being considered for a role.
       Prinicipal photography began 4 Feb 1965, as stated in the 5 Feb 1965 DV. The 9 Mar 1965 DV identified the filming location as Indio, CA. According to the 23 Feb 1965 DV, a large portion of the $2.5 production budget was allocated for a herd of cattle, including 103 Herefords and 125 Longhorns. James Phillips, livestock expert for Universal Pictures, paid $1,200 for three young Hereford bulls, which were trained and fed at a cost of $2,500. Although the bulls were insured for $1,250 each, the one named “Nu Star” was considered invaluable to the production, as he was carefully trained to interact with humans. The 14 Jun 1965 LAT noted that rancher Ed Rutherford supplied the production with 200 Longhorn steers.
       As reported in the 12 Mar 1965 DV, stunt players Hal Needham, Stephanie Epper, and Patty Elder narrowly escaped ... More Less

The 15 Jan 1964 LAT reported that The Rare Breed was among seventeen upcoming Universal Pictures productions based on original stories. A news item in the 27 Nov 1964 DV stated that actress Hayley Mills was set to co-star with Maureen O’Hara and James Stewart. On 13 Jan 1967, LAT announced that Juliet Mills, Hayley’s sister, would assume the role. The 4 Feb 1965 DV revealed that Russell Alquist, husband of Juliet Mills, composed what he hoped would be the picture’s title song. According to the 22 Dec 1964 DV, actor Lee Marvin was also being considered for a role.
       Prinicipal photography began 4 Feb 1965, as stated in the 5 Feb 1965 DV. The 9 Mar 1965 DV identified the filming location as Indio, CA. According to the 23 Feb 1965 DV, a large portion of the $2.5 production budget was allocated for a herd of cattle, including 103 Herefords and 125 Longhorns. James Phillips, livestock expert for Universal Pictures, paid $1,200 for three young Hereford bulls, which were trained and fed at a cost of $2,500. Although the bulls were insured for $1,250 each, the one named “Nu Star” was considered invaluable to the production, as he was carefully trained to interact with humans. The 14 Jun 1965 LAT noted that rancher Ed Rutherford supplied the production with 200 Longhorn steers.
       As reported in the 12 Mar 1965 DV, stunt players Hal Needham, Stephanie Epper, and Patty Elder narrowly escaped serious injury during a sequence in which a horse-drawn buckboard accidentally overturned. Needham, who was driving the wagon, sustained a “wrenched shoulder,” while the women avoided being crushed by taking cover in a nearby camera pit. The footage was reportedly used in the completed picture.        The 31 Mar 1965 Var noted that Maureen O’Hara was expected at the 29 Mar 1965 groundbreaking ceremony for a new United Artists theater in Santa Ana, CA. However, O’Hara was needed on set at Universal Studios in Los Angeles, CA, that day so managers from the theater chain brought a box of soil from the construction site to the studio, along with a shovel. This was reportedly the world’s first remote groundbreaking ceremony. As production drew to close, the 9 Apr 1965 DV stated that the cast and crew presented Juliet Mills with a gold-plated shovel as a memento of her adventure in cattle ranching. Filming was completed 9 Apr 1965, as announced in the 13 Apr 1965 DV. On 29 Jun 1965, DV reported that Mills was back at the studio to re-record some of her dialogue.
       The Rare Breed premiered 2 Feb 1966 in Fort Worth, TX, followed by openings in the Texas cities of Dallas, Houston, and San Antonio, respectively, over the next three days. Maureen O’Hara, Juliet Mills, actor Don Galloway, and director Andrew V. McLaglen attended all four events. Due to a scheduling conflict, James Stewart could only attend the Fort Worth premiere. Openings in Los Angeles and New York City followed on 16 Feb 1966. The film garnered positive reviews and received the Parents magazine family medal award. Rental revenues totalled $2 million, as reported in the 4 Jan 1967 Var. An item in the 1 May 1967 DV stated that Vindicator, a bull loaned by James Stewart to the production, was nominated for 1967 PATSY award. Stewart acted as grand marshall of the parade preceding the ceremony.
       Other cast members included Joan Connors (26 Feb 1965 DV) and Perry Lopez (1 Mar 1965 DV). Voice actor Marvin Miller recorded six radio advertisements for the picture, as stated in the 22 Dec 1965 Var.
       “Film Assignments” in the 4 Feb 1965 DV listed the following crew members: Tom Schmidt, assistant director; John del Valle, unit publicist; Jack Gereghty, still photography; Bill Dodds, camera operator; Bill Reisbord, assitant cameraman; Al Ybarra, art director; Jerry MacDonald, coordinator; Ed Broussard, assistant film editor; Luanna Poole, script supervisor; Ralph Owen, gaffer; John Cantrell, best boy; Ace Holmes and Pruitt Romero, props; Walter Woodworth and Carl Johnston, grips; Frank Brendell, special effects; Harold Stacey, painter; Ron Snyder, greensman; Sam Gage, craft service; Fae Smith and Clara Holgate, hairstylists; Allen Snyder, Hank Edds, and Alberta Olds, makeup; Norman Mayreis, Tom Dawson, and Olive Koenitz, wardrobe; Bill Diskin, transportation captain.
       The 10 Feb 1965 DV noted that The Rare Breed marked the final production for veteran electrician Robert Caine, who retired following its completion.
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BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
27 Nov 1964
p. 2.
Daily Variety
22 Dec 1964
p. 2.
Daily Variety
13 Jan 1965
p. 3.
Daily Variety
4 Feb 1965
p. 2, 14.
Daily Variety
5 Feb 1965
p. 10.
Daily Variety
10 Feb 1965
p. 3.
Daily Variety
23 Feb 1965
p. 22.
Daily Variety
26 Feb 1965
p. 2.
Daily Variety
1 Mar 1965
p. 2.
Daily Variety
9 Mar 1965
p. 4.
Daily Variety
12 Mar 1965
p. 6.
Daily Variety
9 Apr 1965
p. 2.
Daily Variety
13 Apr 1965
p. 2.
Daily Variety
29 Jun 1965
p. 2.
Daily Variety
27 Dec 1965
p. 4.
Daily Variety
30 Dec 1965
p. 23.
Daily Variety
28 Jan 1966
p. 3, 8.
Daily Variety
1 May 1967
p. 4.
Los Angeles Times
15 Jan 1964
Section D, p. 10.
Los Angeles Times
13 Jan 1965
Section D, p. 8.
Los Angeles Times
14 Jun 1965
p. 30.
Los Angeles Times
11 Feb 1966
Section D, p. 11.
Los Angeles Times
18 Feb 1966
Section C, p. 12.
New York Times
14 Apr 1966
p. 42.
Variety
31 Mar 1965
p. 4.
Variety
22 Dec 1965
p. 15.
Variety
5 Jan 1966
p. 17.
Variety
26 Jan 1966
p. 22.
Variety
4 Jan 1967
p. 8.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
In charge of prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
COSTUMES
VISUAL EFFECTS
Matte supv
Main titles
MAKEUP
Makeup
Hairstyles
PRODUCTION MISC
Unit prod mgr
Action coordinator
Tech adv
Dial coach
DETAILS
Release Date:
16 February 1966
Premiere Information:
Fort Worth, Texas, premiere: 2 February 1966
New York and Los Angeles openings: 16 February 1966
Production Date:
4 February--9 April 1965
Copyright Claimant:
Universal Pictures
Copyright Date:
5 March 1966
Copyright Number:
LP35371
Physical Properties:
Sound
Westrex
Color
Technicolor
Widescreen/ratio
Panavision
Duration(in mins):
97
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Martha Price, an English widow, arrives in Saint Louis in 1884 with her daughter Hilary, 4 milking cows, and Vindicator, a hornless Hereford bull. She hopes to sell the bull for breeding purposes, believing that the crossbreeding process will improve upon the lean longhorn cattle prevalent in the West. Vindicator is sold to cattle baron Alexander Bowen, a widower originally from Scotland, and saddle tramp Sam Burnett is hired to deliver the bull to Bowen's Texas ranch. Burnett is skeptical of Martha's theories and is at first party to a scheme to swindle her, but he soon changes sides. En route to Texas, James, Bowen's son, is injured in an unsuccessful attempt by roughnecks to steal Vindicator. Martha and Hilary also go to Bowen's ranch, and Bowen falls in love with Martha. Hilary and James fall in love while she is nursing him back to health, and they plan to marry. That winter, Vindicator and some of the other cattle are lost on the range. When the bull is found dead and it is not known whether he mated successfully, Martha resigns herself to marrying Bowen. But Sam, converted to Martha's theories and a new man because he has something to believe in, goes on a long search of the range and returns with a Hereford calf. Martha then decides to stay in Texas, marry Sam, and raise ... +


Martha Price, an English widow, arrives in Saint Louis in 1884 with her daughter Hilary, 4 milking cows, and Vindicator, a hornless Hereford bull. She hopes to sell the bull for breeding purposes, believing that the crossbreeding process will improve upon the lean longhorn cattle prevalent in the West. Vindicator is sold to cattle baron Alexander Bowen, a widower originally from Scotland, and saddle tramp Sam Burnett is hired to deliver the bull to Bowen's Texas ranch. Burnett is skeptical of Martha's theories and is at first party to a scheme to swindle her, but he soon changes sides. En route to Texas, James, Bowen's son, is injured in an unsuccessful attempt by roughnecks to steal Vindicator. Martha and Hilary also go to Bowen's ranch, and Bowen falls in love with Martha. Hilary and James fall in love while she is nursing him back to health, and they plan to marry. That winter, Vindicator and some of the other cattle are lost on the range. When the bull is found dead and it is not known whether he mated successfully, Martha resigns herself to marrying Bowen. But Sam, converted to Martha's theories and a new man because he has something to believe in, goes on a long search of the range and returns with a Hereford calf. Martha then decides to stay in Texas, marry Sam, and raise Herefords. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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