Daughter of Mine (1919)

Drama | 30 March 1919

Director:

Clarence G. Badger

Writer:

Hugo Ballin

Production Designer:

Hugo Ballin

Production Company:

Goldwyn Pictures Corp.
Full page view
HISTORY

The 7 Jan 1919 Wid’s Daily announced that principal photography was currently in progress. Articles in the 8 Mar 1919 and 5 Apr 1919 issues of Moving Picture World noted that star Madge Kennedy, as well as her fellow cast members, each appeared in two roles: a true-to-life character and a storybook character as imagined by protagonist “Rosie Mendelsohn.” According to the 15 Mar 1919 Moving Picture World, the production was conceived by Goldwyn Pictures Corp. art director Hugo Ballin, who had been with the company since its inception. In addition to writing the scenario and creating the sets, Ballin also contributed “details of action” and intertitles.
       The 8 Mar 1919 Moving Picture World identified the New York City shooting location as Ludlow Street on the Lower East Side of Manhattan Island. The crew constructed a platform on the sidewalk opposite a particular tenement building, enabling cameraman Marcel Le Picard to focus on “various illuminating bits of action” through the windows of each apartment. Filming was often hindered by a crowd of onlookers from the neighborhood. The remaining scenes were shot at Goldwyn Studios in Culver City, CA.
       The 29 Mar 1919 Moving Picture World noted that the song “Daughter Of Mine” was commissioned by the “executive committee” of Leo Feist, Inc., and composed by Archie Gottler and Sidney D. Mitchell. The sheet music bore the statement, “Dedicated to Madge Kennedy—The Dream Girl of The Screen/By courtesy of Goldwyn Pictures Corporation.”
       Daughter of Mine was released 30 Mar 1919, and opened at New York City’s ...

More Less

The 7 Jan 1919 Wid’s Daily announced that principal photography was currently in progress. Articles in the 8 Mar 1919 and 5 Apr 1919 issues of Moving Picture World noted that star Madge Kennedy, as well as her fellow cast members, each appeared in two roles: a true-to-life character and a storybook character as imagined by protagonist “Rosie Mendelsohn.” According to the 15 Mar 1919 Moving Picture World, the production was conceived by Goldwyn Pictures Corp. art director Hugo Ballin, who had been with the company since its inception. In addition to writing the scenario and creating the sets, Ballin also contributed “details of action” and intertitles.
       The 8 Mar 1919 Moving Picture World identified the New York City shooting location as Ludlow Street on the Lower East Side of Manhattan Island. The crew constructed a platform on the sidewalk opposite a particular tenement building, enabling cameraman Marcel Le Picard to focus on “various illuminating bits of action” through the windows of each apartment. Filming was often hindered by a crowd of onlookers from the neighborhood. The remaining scenes were shot at Goldwyn Studios in Culver City, CA.
       The 29 Mar 1919 Moving Picture World noted that the song “Daughter Of Mine” was commissioned by the “executive committee” of Leo Feist, Inc., and composed by Archie Gottler and Sidney D. Mitchell. The sheet music bore the statement, “Dedicated to Madge Kennedy—The Dream Girl of The Screen/By courtesy of Goldwyn Pictures Corporation.”
       Daughter of Mine was released 30 Mar 1919, and opened at New York City’s Strand Theatre the following week, according to the 8 Apr 1919 Wid’s Daily. Reviews in the 17 May 1919 Motion Picture News and Jun 1919 Photoplay complimented Madge Kennedy’s performance and the overall professionalism of the production.
       The scenario was adapted as a short story in the Jun 1919 Picture-Play.

Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Exhibitors Trade Review
3 May 1919
p. 1683
Motion Picture News
1 Feb 1919
p. 718
Motion Picture News
12 Apr 1919
p. 2332
Motion Picture News
17 May 1919
p. 3278
Moving Picture World
1 Feb 1919
p. 658
Moving Picture World
8 Mar 1919
p. 1372, 1378
Moving Picture World
15 Mar 1919
p. 1515
Moving Picture World
29 Mar 1919
p. 1825
Moving Picture World
5 Apr 1919
p. 110
Moving Picture World
10 May 1919
p. 935
Photoplay
Jun 1919
p. 122
Picture-Play
Jun 1919
p. 238
Variety
2 May 1919
p. 59
Wid's Daily
7 Jan 1919
---
Wid's Daily
8 Apr 1919
---
Wid's Daily
27 Apr 1919
p. 23
DETAILS
Release Date:
30 March 1919
Premiere Information:
New York opening: early Apr 1919
Production Date:
began early Jan 1919
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Goldwyn Pictures Corp.
21 March 1919
LP13523
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
4,680
Length(in reels):
5
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Rosie Mendelsohn, the daughter of a kindly Jewish tailor in New York City's East Side ghetto, ends her romance with struggling author George Howard at the behest of her father, who prohibits her marriage to a gentile. George disappears from her life, and Rosie attempts to find him by becoming a private secretary to publisher Joseph Rayberg. She persuades Rayberg to host a contest in which authors submit endings to an unfinished manuscript she claims to have discovered. Rayberg, intent on seducing Rosie, agrees to publish the manuscript only after Rosie promises to have sex him when the contest is over. In reality, the manuscript is a portion of George's novel, a humorous story based on Rosie's life. After receiving George's ending to the story, Rayberg locks Rosie in his office, but she escapes into George's arms. Her father relents and blesses their ...

More Less

Rosie Mendelsohn, the daughter of a kindly Jewish tailor in New York City's East Side ghetto, ends her romance with struggling author George Howard at the behest of her father, who prohibits her marriage to a gentile. George disappears from her life, and Rosie attempts to find him by becoming a private secretary to publisher Joseph Rayberg. She persuades Rayberg to host a contest in which authors submit endings to an unfinished manuscript she claims to have discovered. Rayberg, intent on seducing Rosie, agrees to publish the manuscript only after Rosie promises to have sex him when the contest is over. In reality, the manuscript is a portion of George's novel, a humorous story based on Rosie's life. After receiving George's ending to the story, Rayberg locks Rosie in his office, but she escapes into George's arms. Her father relents and blesses their union.

Less

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

2001: A Space Odyssey

Opening credits precede a title card that reads: "The Dawn of Man."
       In an interview in the 16 Jan 1966 NYT, writer-director-producer Stanley Kubrick discussed ... >>

Top Gun

The following written prologue appears before the title: “On March 3, 1969 the United States Navy established an elite school for the top one percent of its pilots. Its ... >>

The Godfather

The film's opening title card reads: "Mario Puzo's The Godfather." While the first strains of a trumpet solo of Nino Rota's "Godfather" theme are heard on ... >>

Jaws 2

Shortly after the enormous success of Steven Spielberg’s Jaws (1975, see entry), a 22 Jul 1975 DV news item reported that a sequel was approved ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.