The Legend of the Boy and the Eagle (1967)

48 mins | Drama | 21 June 1967

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HISTORY

Location scenes filmed in Coconino National Park, Monument Valley, Canyon de Chelly, Wupatki, National Monument, Arizona; Zuni, New Mexico, and Glen ... More Less

Location scenes filmed in Coconino National Park, Monument Valley, Canyon de Chelly, Wupatki, National Monument, Arizona; Zuni, New Mexico, and Glen Canyon. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
Assoc prod
Prod assoc
WRITERS
Based on a legend related by
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Dir of photog
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
MUSIC
SOUND
Music ed
PRODUCTION MISC
Animal supv
DETAILS
Release Date:
21 June 1967
Copyright Claimant:
Walt Disney Productions
Copyright Date:
1 June 1967
Copyright Number:
LP34466
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA
Color
Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
48
Country:
United States
SYNOPSIS

While Hopi Indian boys in Arizona perform their traditional eagle dance, a tribal elder relates to the youngsters of the tribe the 500-year-old legend behind the ritual: In the ancient village of Wupatki, ten-year-old Tutuvina climbs to the roof of a cliff dwelling to feed a young eagle, which someday will be sacrificed to the gods for a bountiful corn crop. Tutuvina wears a turquoise necklace, the symbol of tribal membership. The other young braves are jealous because they feel that an older boy, Crawling Wolf, should have the honor of caring for the sacred bird. Time passes, and a warm relationship grows between the boy and the eagle, which he has named Oh Mau Mana. One day the tribal dancers march to a cave where they secretly prepare for the sacrifice. Tutuvina, though aware that interfering with the ritual will defy the gods and disgrace his father, follows his heart and releases the bird, whereupon he is immediately stripped of his honored necklace and banished to the desert for twelve moons. Weary and weak, he falls prey to vultures but is saved by Oh Mau Mana. Tutuvina learns the ways of the eagle and becomes an expert hunter, but he soon becomes homesick and decides to return to his tribe. Though admired as a great hunter he is treated as an outcaste, but he remembers the pride of the eagle and begins an eagle dance. Grabbing Crawling Wolf's necklace, he races to the top of a cliff, spreads his arms, and soars into the air. Before their eyes he is transformed into an eagle and is joined by Oh Mau Mana. Two golden eagles are then seen perched ... +


While Hopi Indian boys in Arizona perform their traditional eagle dance, a tribal elder relates to the youngsters of the tribe the 500-year-old legend behind the ritual: In the ancient village of Wupatki, ten-year-old Tutuvina climbs to the roof of a cliff dwelling to feed a young eagle, which someday will be sacrificed to the gods for a bountiful corn crop. Tutuvina wears a turquoise necklace, the symbol of tribal membership. The other young braves are jealous because they feel that an older boy, Crawling Wolf, should have the honor of caring for the sacred bird. Time passes, and a warm relationship grows between the boy and the eagle, which he has named Oh Mau Mana. One day the tribal dancers march to a cave where they secretly prepare for the sacrifice. Tutuvina, though aware that interfering with the ritual will defy the gods and disgrace his father, follows his heart and releases the bird, whereupon he is immediately stripped of his honored necklace and banished to the desert for twelve moons. Weary and weak, he falls prey to vultures but is saved by Oh Mau Mana. Tutuvina learns the ways of the eagle and becomes an expert hunter, but he soon becomes homesick and decides to return to his tribe. Though admired as a great hunter he is treated as an outcaste, but he remembers the pride of the eagle and begins an eagle dance. Grabbing Crawling Wolf's necklace, he races to the top of a cliff, spreads his arms, and soars into the air. Before their eyes he is transformed into an eagle and is joined by Oh Mau Mana. Two golden eagles are then seen perched on a ledge surveying their domain, one of them wearing a turquoise necklace. The eagle dance, the storyteller says, is performed by the Hopi boys in remembrance of brave Tutuvina. +

GENRE
Genre:
Sub-genre:
Educational/cultural


Subject

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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