Coming Out Party (1934)

77 or 79-80 mins | Drama | 9 March 1934

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HISTORY

The opening credits of the film appear in the form of invitation cards, the first reading "Fox Film invites you to Jesse L. Lasky's Coming Out Party R.s.v.p. 715 Park Avenue." NYT called the film Coming-Out Party . The working title was Society Debut . This was British actor Nigel Bruce's first American film. According to a DV news item, a number of "debs and sub-debs" from all parts of the United States were cast in the film. Although "Joy's" pregnancy is not overtly mentioned in the film, reviews state that during the night of her argument with "Chris" at the roadhouse, their "love is consummated" in his room, and she discovers that she is pregnant just before he is called off to Europe. FD commented, "It looks like considerable cutting and editing eliminated some scenes that would have served to make the film more ... More Less

The opening credits of the film appear in the form of invitation cards, the first reading "Fox Film invites you to Jesse L. Lasky's Coming Out Party R.s.v.p. 715 Park Avenue." NYT called the film Coming-Out Party . The working title was Society Debut . This was British actor Nigel Bruce's first American film. According to a DV news item, a number of "debs and sub-debs" from all parts of the United States were cast in the film. Although "Joy's" pregnancy is not overtly mentioned in the film, reviews state that during the night of her argument with "Chris" at the roadhouse, their "love is consummated" in his room, and she discovers that she is pregnant just before he is called off to Europe. FD commented, "It looks like considerable cutting and editing eliminated some scenes that would have served to make the film more coherent." More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
15 Jan 34
p. 3.
Film Daily
17 Mar 34
p. 4.
Harrison's Reports
24 Mar 34
p. 47.
HF
25 Nov 33
p. 12.
HF
9 Dec 33
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
6 Nov 33
p. 1.
Motion Picture Daily
22 Jan 34
p. 4.
Motion Picture Herald
27 Jan 34
p. 41.
New York Times
17 Mar 34
p. 11.
Variety
20 Mar 34
p. 16.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
WRITERS
Orig story
Orig story
Contr wrt
Contr wrt
PHOTOGRAPHY
ART DIRECTOR
Settings
FILM EDITOR
COSTUMES
MUSIC
SOUND
SOURCES
SONGS
"I Think You're Wonderful," music by Burton Lane, lyrics by Harold Adamson.
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Society Debut
Release Date:
9 March 1934
Production Date:
6 November--mid December 1933
Copyright Claimant:
Fox Film Corp.
Copyright Date:
26 February 1934
Copyright Number:
LP4512
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Noiseless Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
77 or 79-80
Length(in feet):
7,224
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
SYNOPSIS

Joy Stanhope, a Park Avenue debutante whose coming out party promises to be the winter's biggest event, has been carrying on a secret romance with Chris Hansen, a violinist in a jazz band living in a one-room apartment whose parents were Swedish immigrants. Although Chris sees Jimmy Wolverton, deemed the most sought after bachelor in New York, flirt with Joy, his jealousy is not aroused when Joy breaks their date because her mother insists that she accompany Jimmy to a Long Island party. As Jimmy grows very intoxicated while driving to the party, Joy suggests that they stop at a roadhouse. In a private room, Jimmy tries to grab Joy, but after she rebuffs his advances, he falls asleep. Later, Joy revives Jimmy with coffee, and they start to leave, but Chris, performing with his band at the roadhouse, sees them together and insults Joy, who then slaps him. Later that night, Joy goes to Chris's room to explain, and although he dishearteningly tries to tell her that her social standing will keep them apart, they end the argument in an embrace. When the night of her party arrives, Joy anxiously queries Chris's Jewish boss, bandleader Harry Gold, whether Chris has returned from Chicago, where he was playing. When Harry wonders whether Chris may have been detained, Joy breaks down and cries. Figuring out that she is pregnant, Harry urges her to marry Chris despite her parents' objections and vows to get him back in time for the party. When Chris does arrive, he excitedly tells Joy that he has been chosen to accompany a great operatic star on a one-year European concert ... +


Joy Stanhope, a Park Avenue debutante whose coming out party promises to be the winter's biggest event, has been carrying on a secret romance with Chris Hansen, a violinist in a jazz band living in a one-room apartment whose parents were Swedish immigrants. Although Chris sees Jimmy Wolverton, deemed the most sought after bachelor in New York, flirt with Joy, his jealousy is not aroused when Joy breaks their date because her mother insists that she accompany Jimmy to a Long Island party. As Jimmy grows very intoxicated while driving to the party, Joy suggests that they stop at a roadhouse. In a private room, Jimmy tries to grab Joy, but after she rebuffs his advances, he falls asleep. Later, Joy revives Jimmy with coffee, and they start to leave, but Chris, performing with his band at the roadhouse, sees them together and insults Joy, who then slaps him. Later that night, Joy goes to Chris's room to explain, and although he dishearteningly tries to tell her that her social standing will keep them apart, they end the argument in an embrace. When the night of her party arrives, Joy anxiously queries Chris's Jewish boss, bandleader Harry Gold, whether Chris has returned from Chicago, where he was playing. When Harry wonders whether Chris may have been detained, Joy breaks down and cries. Figuring out that she is pregnant, Harry urges her to marry Chris despite her parents' objections and vows to get him back in time for the party. When Chris does arrive, he excitedly tells Joy that he has been chosen to accompany a great operatic star on a one-year European concert tour and must sail immediately. She agrees to wait for him and, unwilling to spoil his "chance in a lifetime," does not reveal her condition. During the party, Joy, dazed and distressed, does nothing to stop Jimmy when, on a whim, he takes her to elope. Meanwhile, Troon, the Stanhope's Scottish family butler, who has helped Joy communicate secretly with Chris in the past, learns from Harry about Joy's predicament. Troon goes to the boat to tell Chris, but they return to learn that Joy and Jimmy have already married. After Harry encourages Chris to fight for Joy, he tries to visit Joy, who has since undergone a nervous breakdown, but her father will not allow him to see her. However, Jimmy, realizing that Joy loves Chris, agrees to let her decide if she wants an annulment. When Joy sees Chris, they kiss, and as the film ends, the 1934 Social Register book is thrown into a trash can. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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