Changes (1969)

93 mins | Melodrama | 11 February 1969

Director:

Hall Bartlett

Producer:

Hall Bartlett

Cinematographer:

Richard Moore

Production Designer:

Jack Poplin

Production Company:

Hall Bartlett, Inc.
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HISTORY

Writer-director-producer Hall Barlett self-financed Changes, which cost somewhere between $1 and $2 million, according to items in the 26 Jan 1968 DV, 10 Dec 1968 DV, and 5 Feb 1969 Var. Hoping to make a film that captured 1960s youth culture accurately, Bartlett surveyed teenagers around the country, as noted in the 4 Apr 1969 LAT, and eventually formed a committee of around thirty people to advise him on the script. One of the committee members, Bill E. Kelly, was credited as Bartlett’s co-writer. An article in the 25 Jun 1968 LAT described Bartlett’s advisors as “a strange disparate group ranging from squares to acid-heads by way of pre-med students, the common-law wife of a pop singer and the daughter of a call girl.”
       The 26 Jan 1968 DV noted that filming had recently completed. Around eighty-five percent of the picture was said to have been shot in sequence. Although the chronological approach was more expensive, Bartlett believed it necessary for the largely non-professional cast.
       Folk musician Tim Buckley, who composed songs for the picture, did not read music, according to the 5 Feb 1969 Var. Instead of notation, his process entailed watching 16mm dailies and improvising on his guitar. The title song, “Changes,” was credited to songwriter William “Mickey” Stevenson in the 26 Jan 1968 DV. A 22 Mar 1968 DV brief also named Victoria Basemore as co-writer on the song. However, the film’s soundtrack album credited Kim Weston as singer and songwriter.
       Notices in the 8 Dec 1967 and 19 Dec 1967 DV ... More Less

Writer-director-producer Hall Barlett self-financed Changes, which cost somewhere between $1 and $2 million, according to items in the 26 Jan 1968 DV, 10 Dec 1968 DV, and 5 Feb 1969 Var. Hoping to make a film that captured 1960s youth culture accurately, Bartlett surveyed teenagers around the country, as noted in the 4 Apr 1969 LAT, and eventually formed a committee of around thirty people to advise him on the script. One of the committee members, Bill E. Kelly, was credited as Bartlett’s co-writer. An article in the 25 Jun 1968 LAT described Bartlett’s advisors as “a strange disparate group ranging from squares to acid-heads by way of pre-med students, the common-law wife of a pop singer and the daughter of a call girl.”
       The 26 Jan 1968 DV noted that filming had recently completed. Around eighty-five percent of the picture was said to have been shot in sequence. Although the chronological approach was more expensive, Bartlett believed it necessary for the largely non-professional cast.
       Folk musician Tim Buckley, who composed songs for the picture, did not read music, according to the 5 Feb 1969 Var. Instead of notation, his process entailed watching 16mm dailies and improvising on his guitar. The title song, “Changes,” was credited to songwriter William “Mickey” Stevenson in the 26 Jan 1968 DV. A 22 Mar 1968 DV brief also named Victoria Basemore as co-writer on the song. However, the film’s soundtrack album credited Kim Weston as singer and songwriter.
       Notices in the 8 Dec 1967 and 19 Dec 1967 DV listed Debbie Turner, Emory Parnell, and Diane Deininger as cast members.
       On 10 Dec 1968, DV announced that Cinerama Releasing Corp. was in the process of acquiring distribution rights. The film was said to have been ready for release since fall 1968. Cinerama’s deal, nearly finalized, reportedly agreed to release the film with “no substantial alteration[s],” and to arrange preview screenings in major markets as well as a promotional tour for Bartlett and the four leading actors. A slow release pattern was planned, with the film to debut at single theaters in “key cities.”
       Changes opened on 11 Feb 1969 at the 68th Street Playhouse in New York City. There, the picture set box-office records two weeks in a row, according to a 26 Feb 1969 DV item. A Los Angeles, CA, opening was scheduled to follow on 2 Apr 1969 at the Music Hall in Beverly Hills, an advertisement in the 27 Mar 1969 LAT noted. After receiving mixed reviews, the picture was chosen as the U.S. entry to the San Sebastian Film Festival, according to the 18 Jun 1969 LAT.
       Marcia Strassman made her feature film debut in Changes, as did the film’s star, Kent Lane, who was Hall Bartlett’s real-life stepson. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
8 Dec 1967
p. 20.
Daily Variety
19 Dec 1967
p. 4.
Daily Variety
26 Jan 1968
p. 1, 39.
Daily Variety
22 Mar 1968
p. 32.
Daily Variety
10 Dec 1968
p. 1, 4.
Daily Variety
4 Feb 1969
p. 3.
Daily Variety
26 Feb 1969
p. 16.
Daily Variety
6 Mar 1969
p. 8.
Los Angeles Times
25 Jun 1968
Section G, p. 1.
Los Angeles Times
27 Mar 1969
Section I, p. 2.
Los Angeles Times
4 Apr 1969
Section H, p. 12.
Los Angeles Times
16 Apr 1969
Section G, p. 1, 13.
Los Angeles Times
18 Jun 1969
Section E, p. 10.
New York Times
12 Feb 1969
p. 34.
Variety
5 Feb 1969
p. 24.
Variety
25 Jun 1969
p. 69.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Hall Bartlett Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
Addl dial
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
Main titles
SOURCES
SONGS
"Changes," words and music by Kim Weston, sung by Kim Weston
"Both Sides Now," words and music by Joni Mitchell, sung by Judy Collins
"Expecting To Fly," words and music by Neil Young, sung by Condello.
DETAILS
Release Date:
11 February 1969
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 11 February 1969 at the 68th Street Playhouse
Los Angeles opening: 2 April 1969 at the Music Hall in Beverly Hills
Production Date:
late 1967/early 1968
Copyright Claimant:
Hall Bartlett, Inc.
Copyright Date:
11 February 1969
Copyright Number:
LP38512
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Eastman Color
Widescreen/ratio
Panavision
Duration(in mins):
93
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
21820
SYNOPSIS

Alienated from his family and friends, Kent, a West Coast student, drops out of college and takes to the road in his sports car. While driving along the Big Sur coastline, he thinks about his hometown girl friend Bobbi's dependence on his love, his college roommate's acceptance of establishment rules, and his parents' failure to understand the problems of youth. At one point Kent had tried to explain to Bobbi why he felt that he could not assume responsibility for her, but the lonely girl's feeling of rejection had driven her to suicide. The recollection of Bobbi's tragedy causes Kent to lose control of his car, and he crashes over an embankment. He hitchhikes aimlessly until he is picked up by Kristine, a freelance reporter who conducts campus interviews. After covering a peace demonstration, they spend the night together, but Kent leaves when he realizes that she also has needs that he is unwilling to fulfill. Finally, Kent wanders into a carnival, where he meets Julie, an independent young woman who gets him a job and allows him to move into her apartment. For a time Kent is happy, but soon he feels the need to move on. When Julie asks to go with him and is refused, she rebukes Kent for his selfishness and lack of purpose. Although he leaves again, Julie's words have reached him, and he sets off determined to make his life ... +


Alienated from his family and friends, Kent, a West Coast student, drops out of college and takes to the road in his sports car. While driving along the Big Sur coastline, he thinks about his hometown girl friend Bobbi's dependence on his love, his college roommate's acceptance of establishment rules, and his parents' failure to understand the problems of youth. At one point Kent had tried to explain to Bobbi why he felt that he could not assume responsibility for her, but the lonely girl's feeling of rejection had driven her to suicide. The recollection of Bobbi's tragedy causes Kent to lose control of his car, and he crashes over an embankment. He hitchhikes aimlessly until he is picked up by Kristine, a freelance reporter who conducts campus interviews. After covering a peace demonstration, they spend the night together, but Kent leaves when he realizes that she also has needs that he is unwilling to fulfill. Finally, Kent wanders into a carnival, where he meets Julie, an independent young woman who gets him a job and allows him to move into her apartment. For a time Kent is happy, but soon he feels the need to move on. When Julie asks to go with him and is refused, she rebukes Kent for his selfishness and lack of purpose. Although he leaves again, Julie's words have reached him, and he sets off determined to make his life meaningful. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.