Caprice (1967)

98 mins | Comedy | 24 May 1967

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HISTORY

According to an 18 Feb 1966 DV item, director Frank Tashlin decided to reunite with The Glass Bottom Boat (1966, see entry) producers Aaron Rosenberg and Martin Melcher (husband and manager of actress Doris Day) for Caprice. The picture was modeled as a vehicle for Day, and would replace another defunct project titled Fifth Avenue Follies on Rosenberg and Melcher’s Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp. production schedule. John Kohn was also signed to produce the film, which he would write from an original story he developed with Martin Hale. A 4 Apr 1966 DV article explained that the collaboration was made outside Kohl’s standing arrangement with Columbia Pictures, which claimed first-look rights to ideas developed under his independent company, Cinecrest. A few weeks later, however, the 21 Apr 1966 edition announced that Kohl had amicably left the project following disagreements over script revisions. Contemporary reviews attributed final screenplay credit to Tashlin and Jay Jayson, who also developed the story.
       On 3 Mar 1966, DV announced the casting of Richard Harris as Day’s co-star. Throughout production, multiple DV and LAT casting announcements reported that the following also had roles in the film, which could not be confirmed: Fox contract player Mary Michael; Valerie Miller; stand-up comedian Romo Vincent, who played a movie theater patron that catches Day as she falls off a balcony; George Wallace; David Ross; Yutta D’Arcy; Jeanette O’Connor; dancer Maurice Kelly, who was cast as an onscreen choreographer; former Miss Universe 1964, Corinna Tsopei; Muriel Landers; Pat Becker; and Madge Cleveland, referred to as “The Screamer,” who portrayed a distraught victim of ... More Less

According to an 18 Feb 1966 DV item, director Frank Tashlin decided to reunite with The Glass Bottom Boat (1966, see entry) producers Aaron Rosenberg and Martin Melcher (husband and manager of actress Doris Day) for Caprice. The picture was modeled as a vehicle for Day, and would replace another defunct project titled Fifth Avenue Follies on Rosenberg and Melcher’s Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp. production schedule. John Kohn was also signed to produce the film, which he would write from an original story he developed with Martin Hale. A 4 Apr 1966 DV article explained that the collaboration was made outside Kohl’s standing arrangement with Columbia Pictures, which claimed first-look rights to ideas developed under his independent company, Cinecrest. A few weeks later, however, the 21 Apr 1966 edition announced that Kohl had amicably left the project following disagreements over script revisions. Contemporary reviews attributed final screenplay credit to Tashlin and Jay Jayson, who also developed the story.
       On 3 Mar 1966, DV announced the casting of Richard Harris as Day’s co-star. Throughout production, multiple DV and LAT casting announcements reported that the following also had roles in the film, which could not be confirmed: Fox contract player Mary Michael; Valerie Miller; stand-up comedian Romo Vincent, who played a movie theater patron that catches Day as she falls off a balcony; George Wallace; David Ross; Yutta D’Arcy; Jeanette O’Connor; dancer Maurice Kelly, who was cast as an onscreen choreographer; former Miss Universe 1964, Corinna Tsopei; Muriel Landers; Pat Becker; and Madge Cleveland, referred to as “The Screamer,” who portrayed a distraught victim of a male voyeur. The 9 Feb 1967 Los Angeles Sentinel claimed that Consuela Neal also appeared, while the 4 Jul 1966 LAT noted that fashion model Jaki Ray posed for a still photograph used in the picture.
       Before the official start of production, the 19 May 1966 DV stated that a thirty-nine person crew completed a special ski chase and helicopter rescue sequence at the Mammoth Mountain ski slopes in Mammoth Lakes, CA. Bob Bergstrom served as a technical director, with David Jones piloting the jet helicopter. According to a 26 May 1966 DV brief, additional scenes featuring nine models were shot around the pool of Tashlin’s Southern California home. Photography with the principal actors began the following week, on 3 Jun 1966, as indicated by that day’s DV production charts. The 27 May 1966 DV named the Carthay Circle Theatre, Century House restaurant, the Gaylord Hotel, Grauman’s Chinese Theatre, the LAT headquarters, and the Bradbury Building among the many Los Angeles, CA-area locations. An article published in the 20 Sep 1966 LAT noted that the studio art department installed a large mobile in the lobby of the Bradbury Building, which doubled as the interior of a Parisian cosmetics firm.
       Nearly two months after beginning work, Day suffered a shoulder injury. The 2 Aug 1966 DV announced that filming had been stalled, and the production remained shut down until 16 Aug 1966, when DV reported the actress had returned to set. Harris, however, had been sent to the hospital for a “series of tests,” causing filmmakers to shoot around his character. A 19 Aug 1966 DV item noted that the crew had since shifted to a daily schedule running from 11:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. Exactly one month later, DV reported that Harris had completed work on the morning of 17 Sep 1966 on location at Van Nuys Airport in northern Los Angeles. Second unit filming concluded around mid-Nov 1966, according to the 21 Nov 1966 DV.
       During production, a 7 Sep 1966 DV obituary announced the death of Fox studio dialogue coach Gardner Halliday of apparent drug overdose. Halliday had been suffering from cancer, and was working on Caprice at the time.
       According to the 22 May 1967 LAT, a benefit premiere in honor of the Black-Foxe School for Boys was to be held 23 May 1967 at the Village Theatre in Westwood, CA. A citywide engagement launched the following day, 24 May 1967, before the picture expanded to New York City theaters on 7 Jun 1967. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
18 Feb 1966
p. 2.
Daily Variety
3 Mar 1966
p. 1.
Daily Variety
4 Apr 1966
p. 3.
Daily Variety
21 Apr 1966
p. 2.
Daily Variety
19 May 1966
p. 2.
Daily Variety
26 May 1966
p. 2.
Daily Variety
27 May 1966
p. 16.
Daily Variety
3 Jun 1966
p. 9.
Daily Variety
15 Jun 1966
p. 30.
Daily Variety
28 Jun 1966
p. 2.
Daily Variety
1 Aug 1966
p. 3.
Daily Variety
2 Aug 1966
p. 2.
Daily Variety
16 Aug 1966
p. 2.
Daily Variety
19 Aug 1966
p. 2.
Daily Variety
22 Aug 1966
p. 11.
Daily Variety
25 Aug 1966
p. 4.
Daily Variety
26 Aug 1966
p. 6.
Daily Variety
7 Sep 1966
p. 10.
Daily Variety
19 Sep 1966
p. 2.
Daily Variety
21 Nov 1966
p. 2.
Daily Variety
16 May 1967
p. 3.
Los Angeles Sentinel
9 Feb 1967
Section B, p. 11.
Los Angeles Times
4 Jul 1966
Section D, p. 15.
Los Angeles Times
13 Jul 1966
Section C, p. 13.
Los Angeles Times
29 Aug 1966
Section C, p. 20.
Los Angeles Times
7 Sep 1966
Section C, p. 15.
Los Angeles Times
9 Sep 1966
Section C, p. 12.
Los Angeles Times
20 Sep 1966
Section C, p. 1, 9.
Los Angeles Times
28 Sep 1966
Section D, p. 12.
Los Angeles Times
3 Jan 1967
Section B, p. 14.
Los Angeles Times
15 May 1967
Section D, p. 25.
Los Angeles Times
22 May 1967
Section D, p. 24.
Los Angeles Times
26 May 1967
Section E, p. 11.
New York Times
7 Jun 1967
p. 41.
New York Times
8 Jun 1967
p. 52.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
An Aaron Rosenberg-Martin Melcher Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Story
Story
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Aerial photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
COSTUMES
Cost des
MUSIC
Mus
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec photog eff
Spec photog eff
MAKEUP
Makeup
Makeup
Miss Day's hair styles
Hair styles supv
PRODUCTION MISC
Unit prod mgr
"Batman" television seq based on characters create
SOURCES
SONGS
"Caprice," words and music by Larry Marks.
COMPOSER
DETAILS
Release Date:
24 May 1967
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles premiere: 23 May 1967
Los Angeles opening: 24 May 1967
New York opening: 7 June 1967
Production Date:
began 3 June 1966
Copyright Claimant:
Melcher-Arcola Productions
Copyright Date:
24 May 1967
Copyright Number:
LP34467
Physical Properties:
Sound
Westrex
Color
De Luxe
Widescreen/ratio
CinemaScope
Duration(in mins):
98
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Pat Fowler, an industrial spy employed by Sir Jason Fox of Femina Cosmetics, is arrested in Paris for attempting to sell the formula for a new deodorant to a rival firm owned by Matt Cutter. The arrest is actually a ruse concocted by Sir Jason to trick Cutter into hiring Pat. The scheme works, and Pat sets out to steal the secret formula for a spray that prevents hair from getting wet even when under water. The spray is the invention of the eccentric Dr. Stuart Clancy, Cutter's top cosmetician. Also involved in the espionage is Christopher White, a double agent who lures Pat to his apartment, drugs her, and tape records all she knows about Sir Jason's enterprises. He also learns that Pat's father, an Interpol agent, was shot to death on a Swiss ski slope while on the trail of a narcotics ring. Upon discovering that all of Clancy's preparations are actually formulated in Switzerland by his mother-in-law, Madame Piasco, Pat flies there and steals a vial of the hair spray from the woman's cosmetics shop. Afterwards, she goes skiing on the slope where her father was killed and is saved from a similar fate by Christopher, who comes to the rescue in a helicopter. Now certain that Clancy is her father's murderer, Pat confides in Christopher and learns that he is her father's Interpol replacement. After uncovering evidence which proves that Sir Jason and Clancy are concealing narcotics in a brand of face powder which the innocent Cutter retails, Pat is trapped by a menacing scrubwoman--Clancy in disguise. Clancy meets his own death when he tries to kill Pat. But Pat is again trapped, this time ... +


Pat Fowler, an industrial spy employed by Sir Jason Fox of Femina Cosmetics, is arrested in Paris for attempting to sell the formula for a new deodorant to a rival firm owned by Matt Cutter. The arrest is actually a ruse concocted by Sir Jason to trick Cutter into hiring Pat. The scheme works, and Pat sets out to steal the secret formula for a spray that prevents hair from getting wet even when under water. The spray is the invention of the eccentric Dr. Stuart Clancy, Cutter's top cosmetician. Also involved in the espionage is Christopher White, a double agent who lures Pat to his apartment, drugs her, and tape records all she knows about Sir Jason's enterprises. He also learns that Pat's father, an Interpol agent, was shot to death on a Swiss ski slope while on the trail of a narcotics ring. Upon discovering that all of Clancy's preparations are actually formulated in Switzerland by his mother-in-law, Madame Piasco, Pat flies there and steals a vial of the hair spray from the woman's cosmetics shop. Afterwards, she goes skiing on the slope where her father was killed and is saved from a similar fate by Christopher, who comes to the rescue in a helicopter. Now certain that Clancy is her father's murderer, Pat confides in Christopher and learns that he is her father's Interpol replacement. After uncovering evidence which proves that Sir Jason and Clancy are concealing narcotics in a brand of face powder which the innocent Cutter retails, Pat is trapped by a menacing scrubwoman--Clancy in disguise. Clancy meets his own death when he tries to kill Pat. But Pat is again trapped, this time by Sir Jason, who forces her into a waiting helicopter. When it takes off, Christopher fires a shot and kills Sir Jason. His body falls from the open helicopter, and the terrified Pat is left alone in the cockpit. Miraculously she manages to fly to Paris and makes a 2-point landing on top of the Eiffel Tower. Scrambling out of the plane, she races into the arms of the waiting Christopher. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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