Stand Up and Cheer! (1934)

80-81 mins | Musical | 4 May 1934

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HISTORY

The working titles of this film were Fox Movietone Follies for 1933 , Fox Movietone Follies for 1934 , Fox Movietone Follies and Fox Follies . According to information in the Twentieth Century-Fox Records of the Legal Department at the UCLA Arts--Special Collections Library, in 1970, Lincoln Perry, known professionally as Stepin Fetchit, filed a three-million dollar suit charging that Twentieth Century-Fox conspired with CBS to invade his privacy and defame his character when CBS aired clips of the films Stand Up and Cheer! (see below) and In Old Kentucky (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40 ; F3. 2119) on a documentary entitled "Black History: Lost, Stolen or Forgotten." Perry claimed that he was depicted "as a tool of the white man who betrayed the members of his race and [who] earned two million dollars portraying Negroes as inferior human beings." Information pertaining to the disposition of the suit has not been located.
       Although Shirley Temple is listed third in the film's opening onscreen cast credits, she is listed seventh in the ending credits. According to HR news items, Edward Sutherland was originally scheduled to direct the picture, and Lilian Harvey and Winnie Shaw were set for the cast. Sutherland may have been replaced because of illness, while the reasons behind Harvey and Shaw's withdrawals from the film have not been determined. HR also noted that Dorothy Stone had been tested for a role in the picture. Although a FD news item reported that Florence Desmond had been signed for the film, her participation in the completed ... More Less

The working titles of this film were Fox Movietone Follies for 1933 , Fox Movietone Follies for 1934 , Fox Movietone Follies and Fox Follies . According to information in the Twentieth Century-Fox Records of the Legal Department at the UCLA Arts--Special Collections Library, in 1970, Lincoln Perry, known professionally as Stepin Fetchit, filed a three-million dollar suit charging that Twentieth Century-Fox conspired with CBS to invade his privacy and defame his character when CBS aired clips of the films Stand Up and Cheer! (see below) and In Old Kentucky (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40 ; F3. 2119) on a documentary entitled "Black History: Lost, Stolen or Forgotten." Perry claimed that he was depicted "as a tool of the white man who betrayed the members of his race and [who] earned two million dollars portraying Negroes as inferior human beings." Information pertaining to the disposition of the suit has not been located.
       Although Shirley Temple is listed third in the film's opening onscreen cast credits, she is listed seventh in the ending credits. According to HR news items, Edward Sutherland was originally scheduled to direct the picture, and Lilian Harvey and Winnie Shaw were set for the cast. Sutherland may have been replaced because of illness, while the reasons behind Harvey and Shaw's withdrawals from the film have not been determined. HR also noted that Dorothy Stone had been tested for a role in the picture. Although a FD news item reported that Florence Desmond had been signed for the film, her participation in the completed picture has not been confirmed. According to the Twentieth Century-Fox Produced Scripts Collection, also at the UCLA Arts-Special Collections Library, actors considered for inclusion in the film were: Will Rogers, Lew Ayres, Spencer Tracy, Sid Silvers, Sally Eilers, Clara Bow, director David Butler, Victor Jory and Janet Gaynor, for whom a special number entitled "My Favorite Doll" was written by Lew Brown, Sammy Lee and Hans Kraly. The Var review noted that Brown provided the voice of the Jimmy Durante penguin. Stand Up and Cheer! marked the feature film debuts of singer Nick Foran, who later changed his name to Dick Foran, and comedians Frank Mitchell and Jack Durant. According to the Twentieth Century-Fox legal records, the studio rented a Kellett auto-gyro from R. V. H. Mather, and the sequence in which the device was used was filmed on location at Busch Gardens in Pasadena, CA. The legal records note that in 1935, a lawsuit was filed against Fox by Paul Blanton for infringement on a patent for "the art of producing mannikin actors" by painting faces on the legs of dancers. The case was settled out of court for $1,500.
       According to a modern interview with Jane Withers, she was asked by Fox to read for a part in this picture, but after her audition, "in walked the most beautiful child I had ever seen--Shirley Temple. My heart sank to my toes. I knew she'd get the part, and I was right." Another modern source asserts that after seeing Temple in a "Frolics of Youth" short entitled Pardon My Pups , songwriter Jay Gorney requested that she audition for Stand Up and Cheer! . In her autobiography, Temple notes that producer Winfield Sheehan gave her a contract with Fox on the second day of filming her "Baby Take a Bow" number. Contemporary reviewers praised Temple's performance, and the Var reviewer referred to her as a "sure-fire potential kidlet star" and "the unofficial star" of the picture. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
28 Apr 1934.
---
Daily Variety
22 Feb 34
p. 1.
Daily Variety
19 Mar 34
p. 3.
Film Daily
16 Nov 33
p. 8.
Film Daily
20 Apr 34
p. 9, 11
Hollywood Reporter
13 Jun 33
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Nov 34
p. 21.
Hollywood Reporter
14 Dec 33
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Dec 33
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
18 Jan 34
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
22 Jan 34
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
19 Mar 34
p. 19.
Hollywood Reporter
28 Mar 34
pp. 4-9.
Motion Picture Daily
29 Mar 34
p. 7.
Motion Picture Herald
28 Apr 34
p. 38.
New York Times
20 Apr 34
p. 17.
Variety
24 Apr 34
p. 14.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
Nick Foran
Harry Northrup
Celeste Mari Edwards
Marion Shelton
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Collaborator on story and dial
Story idea suggested by
Story idea suggested by
Contr wrt
Contr wrt
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art settings
Art settings
FILM EDITOR
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Mus dir
DANCE
Dances staged by
PRODUCTION MISC
Location mgr
SOURCES
SONGS
"We're Out of the Red," "I'm Laughin'," "Baby Take a Bow," "Broadway's Gone Hill-Billy" and "This Is Our Last Night Together," music and lyrics by Lew Brown and Jay Gorney
"Stand Up and Cheer," music and lyrics by Harry Akst and Lew Brown
"She's Way Up Thar (I'm Way Down Yar)," music and lyrics by Lew Brown.
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Fox Movietone Follies
Fox Movietone Follies for 1934
Fox Movietone Follies for 1933
Release Date:
4 May 1934
Premiere Information:
New York opening: week of 19 April 1934
Production Date:
completed late January 1934
Copyright Claimant:
Fox Film Corp.
Copyright Date:
23 March 1934
Copyright Number:
LP4638
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Noiseless Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
80-81
Length(in feet):
7,300
Length(in reels):
9
Country:
United States
SYNOPSIS

Lawrence Cromwell, a noted Broadway producer and authority on feminine beauty, is appointed Secretary of Amusement, and assigned the responsibility of raising the spirits of the American people so that they can lick the Depression. At a meeting with his assistant secretaries, Lawrence's eye is caught by Mary Adams, head of the children's division, and they begin dating. Some time later, Lawrence's secretary Fosdick announces that George Bernard Shaw is there to see him, but George turns out to be a shimmy-sham dancer whom Lawrence hires as Fosdick's assistant. In another part of Washington, John Harly meets with fellow businessmen to complain about Lawrence. They have made many business deals that depend on the continuance of the Depression, and they are worried that Lawrence's plans will succeed. To stop Lawrence, Harly initiates a giant smear campaign against him. Back at Amusement Headquarters, Jimmy Dugan and his little daughter Shirley wait to see Lawrence. Shirley wanders off and is brought to Mary, who sends for Jimmy. When Lawrence arrives, Jimmy asks for an exemption to the new law that a child under seven may not work. Lawrence gives his permission and the Dugans perform their act for him. Elsewhere, members of the Senate discuss Lawrence's extravagance, with the result that Senators Danforth and Short are assigned to investigate. They talk with Lawrence and tour the facilities with Eustace Dinwiddie, Lawrence's general scout. Later that day, Lawrence goes aboard Harly's yacht, where Harly unsuccessfully attempts to bribe him into giving up. The next morning, in another meeting with his assistants, Lawrence complains about the department's slow progress, the result of ... +


Lawrence Cromwell, a noted Broadway producer and authority on feminine beauty, is appointed Secretary of Amusement, and assigned the responsibility of raising the spirits of the American people so that they can lick the Depression. At a meeting with his assistant secretaries, Lawrence's eye is caught by Mary Adams, head of the children's division, and they begin dating. Some time later, Lawrence's secretary Fosdick announces that George Bernard Shaw is there to see him, but George turns out to be a shimmy-sham dancer whom Lawrence hires as Fosdick's assistant. In another part of Washington, John Harly meets with fellow businessmen to complain about Lawrence. They have made many business deals that depend on the continuance of the Depression, and they are worried that Lawrence's plans will succeed. To stop Lawrence, Harly initiates a giant smear campaign against him. Back at Amusement Headquarters, Jimmy Dugan and his little daughter Shirley wait to see Lawrence. Shirley wanders off and is brought to Mary, who sends for Jimmy. When Lawrence arrives, Jimmy asks for an exemption to the new law that a child under seven may not work. Lawrence gives his permission and the Dugans perform their act for him. Elsewhere, members of the Senate discuss Lawrence's extravagance, with the result that Senators Danforth and Short are assigned to investigate. They talk with Lawrence and tour the facilities with Eustace Dinwiddie, Lawrence's general scout. Later that day, Lawrence goes aboard Harly's yacht, where Harly unsuccessfully attempts to bribe him into giving up. The next morning, in another meeting with his assistants, Lawrence complains about the department's slow progress, the result of an unseen foe spreading discord. The majority of the assistants stand behind Lawrence, but one, Turner, tells him that the department must be closed. After the meeting, Lawrence tells Mary that he is quitting because he cannot handle the pressures from Congress, reporters and investigators, as well as from the public. She says that he is wrong to quit, but that she loves him and will support him regardless. While Mary then watches an audition for Lawrence, George helps a penguin that talks like Jimmy Durante. That afternoon, Lawrence becomes incensed by a radio report that his incompetence is forcing his resignation, which will be a victory for solid citizens everywhere. Mary comes in to inform him that the children's division is a huge success, but before she can, he tells her that he is sticking to his guns. He warns her that the drastic budget cuts he must make will result in the cancellation of the children's division, but as they are talking, they hear another radio news flash about the Amusement Department's success, which is attributed largely to Mary's division. The president calls Lawrence to congratulate him, and Lawrence humbly tells him about Mary's contribution. After the phone call, Lawrence and Mary are notified that the Depression is officially over, and they participate in a gigantic celebration parade featuring people from all walks of life. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.