The One and Only, Genuine, Original Family Band (1968)

110 mins | Comedy-drama, Musical | 21 March 1968

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HISTORY

An article in the 27 Apr 1967 LAT noted that The One and Only, Genuine, Original Family Band was the last film in which Walt Disney Pictures’ founder and chief, Walt Disney, “had a major role planning the details” before his death on 15 Dec 1966. The idea was developed at a time when musicals were making a resurgence in Hollywood, following the success of pictures like Mary Poppins (1964, see entry) and The Sound of Music (1965, see entry).
       Principal photography began on 20 Mar 1967, as stated in the 22 Mar 1967 Var. Shooting took place on the Walt Disney studio lot in Burbank, CA. The production cost an estimated $4 million, according to the 27 Apr 1967 LAT.
       Theatrical release occurred on 21 Mar 1968 at New York City’s Radio City Music Hall, where the film served as the Easter holiday attraction. The 22 Mar 1968 NYT called it “pepless and fizzled” and complained that the songs were out of synch. Reviews in the 20 Mar 1968 DV and 12 Jul 1968 LAT were similarly negative. In an 8 Jan 1969 box-office chart, Var listed the cumulative domestic film rentals as $2.25 million, to date.
       Dinah Shore and Bing Crosby were considered for roles, according to a 16 Dec 1966 DV brief.
       The One and Only, Genuine, Original Family Band marked the feature film acting debut of Goldie Hawn, who was credited as “Goldie Jeanne Hawn.” ... More Less

An article in the 27 Apr 1967 LAT noted that The One and Only, Genuine, Original Family Band was the last film in which Walt Disney Pictures’ founder and chief, Walt Disney, “had a major role planning the details” before his death on 15 Dec 1966. The idea was developed at a time when musicals were making a resurgence in Hollywood, following the success of pictures like Mary Poppins (1964, see entry) and The Sound of Music (1965, see entry).
       Principal photography began on 20 Mar 1967, as stated in the 22 Mar 1967 Var. Shooting took place on the Walt Disney studio lot in Burbank, CA. The production cost an estimated $4 million, according to the 27 Apr 1967 LAT.
       Theatrical release occurred on 21 Mar 1968 at New York City’s Radio City Music Hall, where the film served as the Easter holiday attraction. The 22 Mar 1968 NYT called it “pepless and fizzled” and complained that the songs were out of synch. Reviews in the 20 Mar 1968 DV and 12 Jul 1968 LAT were similarly negative. In an 8 Jan 1969 box-office chart, Var listed the cumulative domestic film rentals as $2.25 million, to date.
       Dinah Shore and Bing Crosby were considered for roles, according to a 16 Dec 1966 DV brief.
       The One and Only, Genuine, Original Family Band marked the feature film acting debut of Goldie Hawn, who was credited as “Goldie Jeanne Hawn.” More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
16 Dec 1966
p. 2.
Daily Variety
23 Jan 1967
p. 2.
Daily Variety
13 Feb 1967
p. 3.
Daily Variety
31 Mar 1967
p. 10.
Daily Variety
20 Mar 1968
p. 3.
Los Angeles Times
22 Mar 1967
Section E, p. 16.
Los Angeles Times
27 Apr 1967
Section D, p. 1, 11.
Los Angeles Times
20 Jun 1968
Section E, p. 15.
Los Angeles Times
12 Jul 1968
Section F, p. 8.
New York Times
17 Mar 1968
Section D, p. 13.
New York Times
22 Mar 1968
p. 55.
Variety
1 Feb 1967
p. 26.
Variety
22 Feb 1967
p. 24.
Variety
22 Mar 1967
p. 20.
Variety
10 May 1967
p. 28.
Variety
17 Jan 1968
p. 3.
Variety
8 Jan 1969
p. 15.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
WRITER
Story & scr
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
COSTUMES
Cost des
Costumers
Costumers
MUSIC
Mus supv, arr & cond
Asst to the cond
SOUND
Sd supv
Sd mix
Music ed
VISUAL EFFECTS
Matte artist
DANCE
Choreog
MAKEUP
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Unit prod mgr
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel The Family Band by Laura Bower Van Nuys (Lincoln, Nebraska, 1961).
SONGS
"Dakota," "'Bout Time," "The One and Only, Genuine, Original Family Band," "Let's Put It Over With Grover," "Ten Feet Off the Ground," "Drummin', Drummin', Drummin'," "The Happiest Girl Alive," "Oh, Benjamin Harrison" and "West of the Wide Missouri," words and music by Richard M. Sherman and Robert B. Sherman.
DETAILS
Release Date:
21 March 1968
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 21 March 1968 at Radio City Music Hall
Los Angeles opening: 10 July 1968
Production Date:
began 20 March 1967
Copyright Claimant:
Walt Disney Productions
Copyright Date:
8 March 1968
Copyright Number:
LP35652
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA
Color
Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
110
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
21530
SYNOPSIS

During the 1888 presidential campaigns of Grover Cleveland and Benjamin Harrison, old Grandpa Bower organizes his son, daughter-in-law, and eight grandchildren into a family band that he hopes will be asked to perform his song, "Let's Put It Over With Grover," at the Democratic convention. Complications arise, however, when Alice, his eldest grandchild, falls in love with Joe Carder, a Republican newspaperman, who persuades Papa Bower to move the family to the newly formed Dakota Territory. Though Grandpa grudgingly accepts and accompanies the family to Rapid City, his strongly partisan political views soon create disharmony. On election night, all the townspeople gather at Frontier Hall for the returns. Just as it appears that Cleveland has been re-elected by popular vote, the telegrapher announces that the Electoral College has elected Harrison to the White House. The outraged Democrats start a brawl that continues until Papa Bower restores peace by ordering the family band to play the national anthem. As the disgruntled Grandpa pays off an election bet by giving Joe a wheelbarrow ride down Main Street, word arrives that Cleveland will divide the Dakota Territory into two states, both Republican, before leaving office. Furthermore, Washington and Montana, both Democratic territories, will be admitted to the Union, thus restoring the political balance in ... +


During the 1888 presidential campaigns of Grover Cleveland and Benjamin Harrison, old Grandpa Bower organizes his son, daughter-in-law, and eight grandchildren into a family band that he hopes will be asked to perform his song, "Let's Put It Over With Grover," at the Democratic convention. Complications arise, however, when Alice, his eldest grandchild, falls in love with Joe Carder, a Republican newspaperman, who persuades Papa Bower to move the family to the newly formed Dakota Territory. Though Grandpa grudgingly accepts and accompanies the family to Rapid City, his strongly partisan political views soon create disharmony. On election night, all the townspeople gather at Frontier Hall for the returns. Just as it appears that Cleveland has been re-elected by popular vote, the telegrapher announces that the Electoral College has elected Harrison to the White House. The outraged Democrats start a brawl that continues until Papa Bower restores peace by ordering the family band to play the national anthem. As the disgruntled Grandpa pays off an election bet by giving Joe a wheelbarrow ride down Main Street, word arrives that Cleveland will divide the Dakota Territory into two states, both Republican, before leaving office. Furthermore, Washington and Montana, both Democratic territories, will be admitted to the Union, thus restoring the political balance in Congress. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.