Inside Daisy Clover (1965)

128 mins | Drama | 22 December 1965

Director:

Robert Mulligan

Writer:

Gavin Lambert

Producer:

Alan J. Pakula

Cinematographer:

Charles Lang Jr.

Editor:

Aaron Stell

Production Designer:

Robert Clatworthy

Production Company:

Park Place Productions
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HISTORY

On 18 Jun 1963, DV and LAT announced that producer Alan J. Pakula and director Robert Mulligan added Inside Daisy Clover to their joint production slate of upcoming projects after purchasing the rights to Gavin Lambert’s novel of the same name. Eight days later, Var reported that Natalie Wood signed on for the title role, continuing her collaboration with the duo upon their completion of Love With the Proper Stranger (1963, see entry). A 2 Aug 1963 DV news item indicated that Wood also intended to be involved through her production company, Rona, Inc., in association with Columbia Pictures. The 12 Nov 1963 DV named Herbert Greene as an associate producer.
       After nearly a year, however, a 28 Oct 1964 Var brief announced that the project had since moved to Warner Bros. Pictures. According to the 17 Dec 1964 DV, costs ran higher than initially anticipated, and Mulligan struggled to plan the production on Columbia’s budget until Warner Bros. stepped in and offered a new deal that included more money.
       Principal photography began 2 Mar 1965 at the Warner Bros. studio lot in Burbank, CA. Two days into production, DV noted that scenes featuring Roddy McDowall were to be shot first in order to accommodate his upcoming schedule requirements for Walt Disney Productions’ The Adventures of Bullwhip Griffin (1967, see entry). Items in the 24 Mar 1965 DV, 14 Apr 1965 Var, and 15 Apr 1965 DV indicated that location work was completed in Pasadena and Oxnard, CA, and on ... More Less

On 18 Jun 1963, DV and LAT announced that producer Alan J. Pakula and director Robert Mulligan added Inside Daisy Clover to their joint production slate of upcoming projects after purchasing the rights to Gavin Lambert’s novel of the same name. Eight days later, Var reported that Natalie Wood signed on for the title role, continuing her collaboration with the duo upon their completion of Love With the Proper Stranger (1963, see entry). A 2 Aug 1963 DV news item indicated that Wood also intended to be involved through her production company, Rona, Inc., in association with Columbia Pictures. The 12 Nov 1963 DV named Herbert Greene as an associate producer.
       After nearly a year, however, a 28 Oct 1964 Var brief announced that the project had since moved to Warner Bros. Pictures. According to the 17 Dec 1964 DV, costs ran higher than initially anticipated, and Mulligan struggled to plan the production on Columbia’s budget until Warner Bros. stepped in and offered a new deal that included more money.
       Principal photography began 2 Mar 1965 at the Warner Bros. studio lot in Burbank, CA. Two days into production, DV noted that scenes featuring Roddy McDowall were to be shot first in order to accommodate his upcoming schedule requirements for Walt Disney Productions’ The Adventures of Bullwhip Griffin (1967, see entry). Items in the 24 Mar 1965 DV, 14 Apr 1965 Var, and 15 Apr 1965 DV indicated that location work was completed in Pasadena and Oxnard, CA, and on Conrad Hilton’s estate in the Los Angeles neighborhood of Bel Air. According to the 9 Jun 1965 Var, “Daisy Clover’s” beach house once belonged to silent screen star Barbara La Marr, and was purchased by Pakula and Mulligan before its scheduled demolition and moved to the Oxnard coast, where it was eventually blown up for the film’s final sequence. An article in the 22 Mar 1965 LAT also referred to scenes that took place at the Santa Monica Pier, which doubled as the fictional “Angel Pier.” Filming likely concluded the first week of Jun 1965, as indicated by a 9 Jun 1965 Var brief.
       Several DV and LAT casting items throughout late development and production named the following actors who appeared in roles that may have been uncredited: Charlotte Knight, who played a motel owner; George Neise as an onscreen film director; Gertrude Flynn as a nurse; Betty Gonzalez; Stanley Farrar; Joseph Mell; Holt Haggart; John Alvin; Jordan Shelley; Otto Malde; Paul Hartman; Robert Totten; and Guy Wilkerson. The 27 Oct 1965 Var also noted that voice actor Marvin Miller provided offscreen performances as both a newsreel commentator and a radio reporter.
       While some contemporary sources suggested Wood may perform her own singing, the 12 Apr 1965 DV and 17 Dec 1965 LAT confirmed her vocal tracks for “The Circus Is A Wacky World,” “A Happy Song,” and “You’re Gonna Hear From Me” were dubbed by Jackie Ward, who also doubled for the actress in The Great Race (1965, see entry). The “New York Sound Track” column of the 14 Apr 1965 Var claimed that the 1934 Edward Heyman and Dana Suesse song “You Out To Be In Pictures” was used on the film’s soundtrack.
       According to a 24 Nov 1965 Var news story, Inside Daisy Clover was scheduled for a special pre-release run beginning with a 22 Dec 1965 premiere at the Pantages Theatre in Hollywood, CA, to qualify for that year’s Academy Awards. Regular screenings resumed on 10 Feb 1966 at the Pix Theater across the street, and one week later at New York City’s Radio City Music Hall.
       Inside Daisy Clover was nominated for three Academy Awards in the categories of Actress in a Supporting Role (Ruth Gordon), Art Direction (Color), and Costume Design (Color). Gordon’s performance earned her a Golden Globe Award for Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role in Any Motion Picture, and Robert Redford was honored as New Star of the Year – Actor. Although several contemporary articles referred to this as his first film role, Redford previously appeared in Situation Hopeless—But Not Serious, which was released a few months earlier (1965, see entry), and War Hunt (1962, see entry). Wood also received a nomination for Actress in a Leading Role – Musical or Comedy. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
18 Jun 1963
p. 3.
Daily Variety
2 Aug 1963
p. 3.
Daily Variety
12 Nov 1963
p. 2.
Daily Variety
17 Dec 1964
p. 1.
Daily Variety
4 Mar 1965
p. 3.
Daily Variety
5 Mar 1965
p. 8.
Daily Variety
24 Mar 1965
p. 6.
Daily Variety
1 Apr 1965
p. 4.
Daily Variety
12 Apr 1965
p. 2.
Daily Variety
12 Apr 1965
p. 4.
Daily Variety
15 Apr 1965
p. 16.
Daily Variety
16 Apr 1965
p. 5.
Daily Variety
19 Apr 1965
p. 4.
Daily Variety
26 Apr 1965
p. 4.
Daily Variety
28 Apr 1965
p. 4.
Daily Variety
4 May 1965
p. 4.
Daily Variety
6 May 1965
p. 4.
Daily Variety
10 May 1965
p. 6.
Daily Variety
12 May 1965
p. 4.
Daily Variety
24 May 1965
p. 11.
Daily Variety
1 Jun 1965
p. 4.
Daily Variety
2 Jun 1965.
---
Los Angeles Times
18 Jun 1963
Section D, p. 11.
Los Angeles Times
22 Mar 1965
Section C, p. 19.
Los Angeles Times
17 Apr 1965
Section B, p. 9.
Los Angeles Times
17 Dec 1965
Section E, p. 22.
Los Angeles Times
23 Dec 1965
Section C, p. 8.
Los Angeles Times
8 Feb 1966
Section C, p. 9.
New York Times
19 Dec 1965
Section X, p. 3, 5.
New York Times
18 Feb 1966
p. 23.
Variety
26 Jun 1963
p. 24.
Variety
28 Oct 1964
p. 21.
Variety
16 Dec 1964
p. 20.
Variety
14 Apr 1965
p. 13.
Variety
14 Apr 1965
p. 69.
Variety
19 May 1965
p. 26.
Variety
26 May 1965
p. 24.
Variety
9 Jun 1965
p. 18.
Variety
27 Oct 1965
p. 22.
Variety
24 Nov 1965
p. 20.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Pakula-Mulligan Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
1st & 2nd asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Cam op
Asst cam
Asst cam
Gaffer
Stills
ART DIRECTORS
Asst art dir
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Montage
SET DECORATORS
Set coordinator
Prop master
COSTUMES
Cost des
Natalie Wood's ward des
Ladies' cost
Ladies' cost
Men's ward
MUSIC
Miss Wood's voice dubbed by
DANCE
Choreog
Choreography & asst to choreography
MAKEUP
Makeup supv
Makeup
Supv hairstyles
Miss Wood's hairstyle dsgn
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
Asst to the prod
Scr supv
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Inside Daisy Clover by Gavin Lambert (New York, 1963).
AUTHOR
SONGS
"The Circus Is a Wacky World," "A Happy Song," and "You're Gonna Hear From Me," words and music by André Previn and Dory Previn.
DETAILS
Release Date:
22 December 1965
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles premiere: 22 December 1965
Los Angeles opening: 10 February 1966
New York opening: 17 February 1966
Production Date:
2 March--early June 1965
Copyright Claimant:
Park Place Productions
Copyright Date:
31 December 1965
Copyright Number:
LP32144
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Technicolor
Widescreen/ratio
Panavision
Duration(in mins):
128
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

In California in 1936, Daisy Clover, a rebellious fifteen-year-old, lives with her mother whom she calls "The Dealer" because of her passion for playing solitaire. Daisy, who likes to sing, makes a recording of her voice and sends it to Hollywood studio head Raymond Swan, who gives Daisy a screen test and then a contract. Daisy's sister, Gloria, connives with her husband and Swan to have "The Dealer" committed to a sanitarium and herself appointed Daisy's guardian. At Swan's party to introduce Daisy to Hollywood, she meets screen idol Wade Lewis and then spends the night with him; and she does so again after the premiere of her film. When Daisy and Wade are summoned to Swan's office to explain their behavior, Wade announces his intention to marry Daisy. They wed, but when Daisy awakens on the first morning of their honeymoon, Wade is gone. She returns to Hollywood, where Melora, Swan's wife, tells Daisy that Wade prefers men to women. Heartbroken, Daisy takes "The Dealer" out of the sanitarium and brings her to live with her at a beachhouse, but "The Dealer" dies shortly thereafter. Daisy, working on a film, has a breakdown at the studio. She becomes a recluse at her beachhouse, refusing to speak to anyone, and makes an abortive suicide attempt. She leaves the house, the gas still on and a flame under the coffee, and the house blows up as she walks down the beach. Daisy is a has-been at seventeen years old, but she has made up her mind to fight ... +


In California in 1936, Daisy Clover, a rebellious fifteen-year-old, lives with her mother whom she calls "The Dealer" because of her passion for playing solitaire. Daisy, who likes to sing, makes a recording of her voice and sends it to Hollywood studio head Raymond Swan, who gives Daisy a screen test and then a contract. Daisy's sister, Gloria, connives with her husband and Swan to have "The Dealer" committed to a sanitarium and herself appointed Daisy's guardian. At Swan's party to introduce Daisy to Hollywood, she meets screen idol Wade Lewis and then spends the night with him; and she does so again after the premiere of her film. When Daisy and Wade are summoned to Swan's office to explain their behavior, Wade announces his intention to marry Daisy. They wed, but when Daisy awakens on the first morning of their honeymoon, Wade is gone. She returns to Hollywood, where Melora, Swan's wife, tells Daisy that Wade prefers men to women. Heartbroken, Daisy takes "The Dealer" out of the sanitarium and brings her to live with her at a beachhouse, but "The Dealer" dies shortly thereafter. Daisy, working on a film, has a breakdown at the studio. She becomes a recluse at her beachhouse, refusing to speak to anyone, and makes an abortive suicide attempt. She leaves the house, the gas still on and a flame under the coffee, and the house blows up as she walks down the beach. Daisy is a has-been at seventeen years old, but she has made up her mind to fight back. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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