My Six Loves (1963)

105 mins | Romantic comedy | 1963

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HISTORY

Copyrighted at 101 ... More Less

Copyrighted at 101 min. More Less

CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Col cons
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
COSTUMES
Cost
MUSIC
Piano solo by
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec photog eff
DANCE
Choreog
MAKEUP
Hairstyles for Miss Reynolds
Hairstyles
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
Unit prod mgr
Scr supv
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel My Six Loves by Peter V. K. Funk (New York, 1963).
SONGS
"It's a Darn Good Thing," music and lyrics by Sammy Cahn and James Van Heusen, sung by Debbie Reynolds.
DETAILS
Release Date:
1963
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 3 April 1963
Copyright Claimant:
Paramount Pictures
Copyright Date:
31 December 1962
Copyright Number:
LP24448
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Technicolor
Widescreen/ratio
VistaVision
Duration(in mins):
105
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Broadway star Janice Courtney collapses from exhaustion during a frantic press conference, and she is ordered to take a long vacation at her Connecticut home. Janice and her secretary-companion, Ethel Swenson, get little rest, however, because of the boisterous housekeeper, Selina, and her beatnik daughter, Ava. The day after her arrival, Janice discovers that six children and a large dog are living in a shack at the back of her property. Aided by the local parson, Jim Larkin, Janice moves the children into her home and is granted temporary custody of them. When her producer, Martin Bliss, insists she begin rehearsing a new show, Janice leaves the children with Ethel and returns to New York. When Jim phones to say that one of the children has run away, Janice quits the play, forsaking her career. As she and Jim find the youngsters back in their shack, they decide to marry and adopt the entire ... +


Broadway star Janice Courtney collapses from exhaustion during a frantic press conference, and she is ordered to take a long vacation at her Connecticut home. Janice and her secretary-companion, Ethel Swenson, get little rest, however, because of the boisterous housekeeper, Selina, and her beatnik daughter, Ava. The day after her arrival, Janice discovers that six children and a large dog are living in a shack at the back of her property. Aided by the local parson, Jim Larkin, Janice moves the children into her home and is granted temporary custody of them. When her producer, Martin Bliss, insists she begin rehearsing a new show, Janice leaves the children with Ethel and returns to New York. When Jim phones to say that one of the children has run away, Janice quits the play, forsaking her career. As she and Jim find the youngsters back in their shack, they decide to marry and adopt the entire brood. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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