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HISTORY

On 27 Sep 1961, Var reported that director Vincent Sherman was interested in making a screen adaptation of Ira Wallach’s 1959 satirical novel Muscle Beach, but two years later, and the 7 Aug 1963 DV announced that film rights had since been picked up by Martin Ransohoff of Filmways, Inc. Wallach was attached to write the screenplay, with Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM) set to distribute. The following day’s DV noted potential marketing conflict over the title with American International Pictures’ (AIP) identically named sequel to Beach Party (1963, see entry). Although AIP was not required to register the title with the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA), they proceeded with release of their film as Muscle Beach Party (see entry) in 1964.
       Development stalled for another two years until a 17 Mar 1965 DV article named Theodore J. Flicker as the new director of the Wallach project, which was now without a title. Flicker was slated to collaborate on the screenplay with Maurice Richlin, and the 8 Apr 1965 edition claimed Ann-Margret was in talks for a role. Around this time, the film was officially retitled Don’t Make Waves, and by the summer, items in the 7 Jul 1965 DV named Myrna Fahey as a possible star. The 13 Jul 1965 DV stated that script duties had shifted to Tom and Frank Waldman for director Blake Edwards.
       The trio’s attachment to the project was likely brief, however, since neither the Waldmans nor Edwards were mentioned in additional contemporary sources, and the following spring, items in the 27 Apr 1966 ...

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On 27 Sep 1961, Var reported that director Vincent Sherman was interested in making a screen adaptation of Ira Wallach’s 1959 satirical novel Muscle Beach, but two years later, and the 7 Aug 1963 DV announced that film rights had since been picked up by Martin Ransohoff of Filmways, Inc. Wallach was attached to write the screenplay, with Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM) set to distribute. The following day’s DV noted potential marketing conflict over the title with American International Pictures’ (AIP) identically named sequel to Beach Party (1963, see entry). Although AIP was not required to register the title with the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA), they proceeded with release of their film as Muscle Beach Party (see entry) in 1964.
       Development stalled for another two years until a 17 Mar 1965 DV article named Theodore J. Flicker as the new director of the Wallach project, which was now without a title. Flicker was slated to collaborate on the screenplay with Maurice Richlin, and the 8 Apr 1965 edition claimed Ann-Margret was in talks for a role. Around this time, the film was officially retitled Don’t Make Waves, and by the summer, items in the 7 Jul 1965 DV named Myrna Fahey as a possible star. The 13 Jul 1965 DV stated that script duties had shifted to Tom and Frank Waldman for director Blake Edwards.
       The trio’s attachment to the project was likely brief, however, since neither the Waldmans nor Edwards were mentioned in additional contemporary sources, and the following spring, items in the 27 Apr 1966 and 11 May 1965 Var confirmed the casting of Tony Curtis under director Alexander Mackendrick. Although an 8 Jul 1966 DV announcement suggested Sharon Tate was brought in as a replacement for Julie Newmar, an earlier edition published on 23 Feb 1966 indicated Tate was already associated with the project. The 7 Oct 1966 LAT claimed Charlie McCarthy would join his friend Edgar Bergen in an onscreen role, but only Bergen’s participation could be confirmed.
       Principal photography began 6 Jul 1966, as stated in a 15 Jul 1966 DV production chart. Filming took place at the MGM studio backlot in Culver City, CA, and on the Malibu coast. According to a 4 Oct 1966 LAT article, “Carlo Cofield’s” cliffside beach house was built three times to scale—twice on MGM’s Stage 30 (for a price of $75,000), and once on location. Additional miniatures used for the mudslide sequence cost $215,000. Principal photography likely concluded in mid-Oct 1966, as indicated by items in the 14 Sep 1966 Var and 11 Oct 1966 DV.
       On 27 Jul 1966, just a few weeks into production, skydiving photographer Bob Buquor died while performing a stunt to record footage of skydivers Leigh Hunt and James Dann, who were doubling for actors. According to an LAT report two days later, Buquor was expected to touch down on land, but was carried out to sea by a gust of wind and drowned due to the weight of his 35mm camera equipment. His body was recovered the following afternoon, some 225 yards offshore.
       IDon’t Make Waves was scheduled to premiere 9 Jun 1967 as part of Myrtle Beach, SC’s Sun Fun Festival, according to the 3 May 1967 Var. The New York City showcase engagement began 20 Jun 1967, followed by a Los Angeles opening on 2 Aug 1967. Reviews were largely negative.

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
PERSONAL & COMPANY INDEX CREDITS
HISTORY CREDITS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
7 Aug 1963
p. 1
Daily Variety
8 Aug 1963
p. 2
Daily Variety
17 Mar 1965
p. 1
Daily Variety
8 Apr 1965
p. 2
Daily Variety
7 Jul 1965
p. 2
Daily Variety
13 Jul 1965
p. 1
Daily Variety
23 Feb 1966
p. 2
Daily Variety
8 Jul 1966
p. 2
Daily Variety
15 Jul 1966
p. 7
Daily Variety
11 Oct 1966
p. 2
Daily Variety
20 Jun 1967
p. 3
Los Angeles Times
29 Jul 1966
Section SF, p. 9
Los Angeles Times
4 Oct 1966
Section C, p. 13
Los Angeles Times
7 Oct 1966
Section D, p. 18
Los Angeles Times
30 Jul 1967
Section P, p. 1, 14
Los Angeles Times
30 Jul 1967
---
New York Times
21 Jun 1967
p. 36
Variety
27 Sep 1961
p. 21
Variety
27 Apr 1966
p. 22
Variety
11 May 1966
p. 22
Variety
14 Sep 1966
p. 4
Variety
3 May 1967
p. 20
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANIES
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Martin Ransohoff Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Dir skydiving seq
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Photog skydiving seq
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
COSTUMES
Ward
MUSIC
Mus comp & cond by
SOUND
Rec supv
MAKEUP
Hairstyles
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
Tech adv
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Muscle Beach by Ira Wallach (Boston, 1959).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
SONGS
"Don't Make Waves," words and music by Jim McGuinn and Chris Hillman, performed by The Byrds.
PERFORMED BY
SONGWRITER/COMPOSER
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Muscle Beach
Release Date:
20 June 1967
Premiere Information:
Myrtle Beach world premiere: 3 May 1967; New York opening: 20 Jun 1967; Los Angeles opening: 2 Aug 1967
Production Date:
6 Jul--mid Oct 1966
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Filmways, Inc.
16 May 1967
LP34227
Physical Properties:
Sound
Westrex
Color
Metrocolor
Widescreen/ratio
Panavision
Duration(in mins):
97
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

When impulsive and reckless Laura Califatti totally wrecks a sports car belonging to tourist Carlo Cofield, she invites the distraught young man to spend the night on the couch of her Malibu Beach apartment. But he is thrown out by Laura's "patron," Rod Prescott, a pompous businessman who runs a swimming pool company owned by his wife. After sleeping on the beach, Carlo goes for a swim, nearly drowns, and is saved by a seductive surfer-skydiver, Malibu, who gives him mouth-to-mouth resuscitation. Captivated by the girl, Carlo decides to settle down in the area. Since he has failed to get any compensation for his sports car, he uses his knowledge of Rod's indiscreet affair with Laura to get a lucrative job as a pool salesman. Then, to further his romance with Malibu, Carlo bribes an astrologist, Madame Lavinia, into telling Malibu's body-builder boyfriend, Harry, that sex is bad for his physique. The romantic entanglements become even more involved when Rod's wife, Diane, announces that she is suing for divorce, naming Laura as corespondent. Eventually, all six participants become trapped in Carlo's cliffside house during a rainstorm. As it tips over and slides down the incline to the muddy beach below, Malibu is reunited with the muscle-bound Harry, Diane agrees to drop her divorce proceedings, and Laura and Carlo discover they are made for each ...

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When impulsive and reckless Laura Califatti totally wrecks a sports car belonging to tourist Carlo Cofield, she invites the distraught young man to spend the night on the couch of her Malibu Beach apartment. But he is thrown out by Laura's "patron," Rod Prescott, a pompous businessman who runs a swimming pool company owned by his wife. After sleeping on the beach, Carlo goes for a swim, nearly drowns, and is saved by a seductive surfer-skydiver, Malibu, who gives him mouth-to-mouth resuscitation. Captivated by the girl, Carlo decides to settle down in the area. Since he has failed to get any compensation for his sports car, he uses his knowledge of Rod's indiscreet affair with Laura to get a lucrative job as a pool salesman. Then, to further his romance with Malibu, Carlo bribes an astrologist, Madame Lavinia, into telling Malibu's body-builder boyfriend, Harry, that sex is bad for his physique. The romantic entanglements become even more involved when Rod's wife, Diane, announces that she is suing for divorce, naming Laura as corespondent. Eventually, all six participants become trapped in Carlo's cliffside house during a rainstorm. As it tips over and slides down the incline to the muddy beach below, Malibu is reunited with the muscle-bound Harry, Diane agrees to drop her divorce proceedings, and Laura and Carlo discover they are made for each other.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.