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HISTORY

Location scenes filmed in Tahiti. Remake of the 1935 M-G-M film of the same title. Carol Reed began directing the 1962 film but was replaced by Lewis Milestone. Charles Lederer is given sole screen credit for writing the screenplay, although Ambler, Driscoll, Chase, Gay, and Hecht ... More Less

Location scenes filmed in Tahiti. Remake of the 1935 M-G-M film of the same title. Carol Reed began directing the 1962 film but was replaced by Lewis Milestone. Charles Lederer is given sole screen credit for writing the screenplay, although Ambler, Driscoll, Chase, Gay, and Hecht assisted. More Less

CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
2nd unit dir
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
Scr
Scr (see note)
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Addl photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
FILM EDITORS
Associate ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
COSTUMES
Cost
MUSIC
Orch cond
SOUND
Rec supv
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec visual eff
Spec visual eff
Spec visual eff
DANCE
Choreog
MAKEUP
Hairstyles
PRODUCTION MISC
Tech adv
Tech adv
Tech adv
Tech adv
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Mutiny on the Bounty by Charles Bernard Nordhoff and James Norman Hall (Boston, 1932).
DETAILS
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 8 November 1962
Copyright Claimant:
Arcola Pictures
Copyright Date:
19 November 1962
Copyright Number:
LP24820
Physical Properties:
Sound
Westrex
Color
Technicolor
gauge
35 & 70
Widescreen/ratio
Ultra Panavision 70
Duration(in mins):
179
Country:
United States
SYNOPSIS

In December of 1787, H. M. S. Bounty sets sail from Portsmouth, England. Her destination is Tahiti, and her mission is to transplant thousands of breadfruit plants from that island to Jamaica in the hope that the plants will become a food staple for plantation slaves. The vessel is commanded by William Bligh, an experienced but tyrannical captain who quickly arouses the ire of the crew. His first officer is Fletcher Christian, a somewhat foppish country gentleman, though an excellent sailor, whose genteel family background irritates the lowborn Bligh. As a result of Bligh's disastrous attempt to reach Tahiti by rounding Cape Horn in midwinter, the ship loses a month of sailing time and arrives in Tahiti at a time when the breadfruit plants are dormant. Bligh is enraged, but the crew is delighted at the prospect of spending 4 months on the beautiful tropical isle. Once the Bounty is again at sea, trouble erupts anew. Goaded on by seaman John Mills and by his own mounting anger against Bligh's cruelty, Christian leads a mutiny and takes control of the ship. Bligh and 18 other men are set adrift in a boat and eventually reach Timor. Christian takes the Bounty back to Tahiti to pick up supplies and those natives, including his own beloved Maimiti, who wish to start a new life with the mutineers. Aware that the British Navy will soon send ships in search of them, Christian looks for a new home and eventually finds the remote and uncharted Pitcairn Island. He soon realizes that he and his men must return to England or forever be hunted as criminals, but he ... +


In December of 1787, H. M. S. Bounty sets sail from Portsmouth, England. Her destination is Tahiti, and her mission is to transplant thousands of breadfruit plants from that island to Jamaica in the hope that the plants will become a food staple for plantation slaves. The vessel is commanded by William Bligh, an experienced but tyrannical captain who quickly arouses the ire of the crew. His first officer is Fletcher Christian, a somewhat foppish country gentleman, though an excellent sailor, whose genteel family background irritates the lowborn Bligh. As a result of Bligh's disastrous attempt to reach Tahiti by rounding Cape Horn in midwinter, the ship loses a month of sailing time and arrives in Tahiti at a time when the breadfruit plants are dormant. Bligh is enraged, but the crew is delighted at the prospect of spending 4 months on the beautiful tropical isle. Once the Bounty is again at sea, trouble erupts anew. Goaded on by seaman John Mills and by his own mounting anger against Bligh's cruelty, Christian leads a mutiny and takes control of the ship. Bligh and 18 other men are set adrift in a boat and eventually reach Timor. Christian takes the Bounty back to Tahiti to pick up supplies and those natives, including his own beloved Maimiti, who wish to start a new life with the mutineers. Aware that the British Navy will soon send ships in search of them, Christian looks for a new home and eventually finds the remote and uncharted Pitcairn Island. He soon realizes that he and his men must return to England or forever be hunted as criminals, but he loses the possibility of a choice when some of the mutineers set fire to the Bounty . In a hopeless attempt to save the ship, Christian is fatally burned. Before dying, he urges his men to stifle their rebellious natures and live in peace with one other. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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