A Guide for the Married Man (1967)

89 mins | Comedy | 26 May 1967

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HISTORY

On 13 Apr 1966, DV announced that writer Frank Tarloff was looking to option the rights to his original screenplay, A Guide for the Married Man, which he was also adapting into a novel. According to documents in AMPAS library files, the book was published in 1967 under the title A Guide for the Married Man, as Told by Frank Tarloff. The “as told by” credit appeared in the film’s onscreen literary sources, and was intended as a joke.
       Later that summer, the 26 and 29 Jul 1966 DV reported that the project had entered development under producer Frank McCarthy at Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp., with Gene Kelly set to direct. According to a 9 Aug 1966 DV brief, McCarthy conferred with Norman Lear, producer of Divorce American Style (1967, see entry), to ensure that there were no similarities between the competing comedies, which both dealt with the subject of dissolving marriage.
       Referring to the film as The Affair: A Guide for the Married Man, the 8 Aug 1966 LAT reported the casting of Jim Hutton in the leading role. By the end of the summer, however, the 19 Sep 1966 edition stated that Hutton had decided to leave the picture following significant rewrites that changed the ages and relationships of the characters. After signing on as Hutton’s replacement, Walter Matthau told the 7 Oct 1966 LAT that his character was initially written as the philanderer who teaches the younger man, played by Robert Morse, how to get away with infidelity, before the roles were reversed.
       According to a 10 ... More Less

On 13 Apr 1966, DV announced that writer Frank Tarloff was looking to option the rights to his original screenplay, A Guide for the Married Man, which he was also adapting into a novel. According to documents in AMPAS library files, the book was published in 1967 under the title A Guide for the Married Man, as Told by Frank Tarloff. The “as told by” credit appeared in the film’s onscreen literary sources, and was intended as a joke.
       Later that summer, the 26 and 29 Jul 1966 DV reported that the project had entered development under producer Frank McCarthy at Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp., with Gene Kelly set to direct. According to a 9 Aug 1966 DV brief, McCarthy conferred with Norman Lear, producer of Divorce American Style (1967, see entry), to ensure that there were no similarities between the competing comedies, which both dealt with the subject of dissolving marriage.
       Referring to the film as The Affair: A Guide for the Married Man, the 8 Aug 1966 LAT reported the casting of Jim Hutton in the leading role. By the end of the summer, however, the 19 Sep 1966 edition stated that Hutton had decided to leave the picture following significant rewrites that changed the ages and relationships of the characters. After signing on as Hutton’s replacement, Walter Matthau told the 7 Oct 1966 LAT that his character was initially written as the philanderer who teaches the younger man, played by Robert Morse, how to get away with infidelity, before the roles were reversed.
       According to a 10 Oct 1966 DV brief, principal photography began that day in Los Angeles, CA. Items in the 30 Sep 1966 and 25 Oct 1966 DV stated that filming took place at twenty-six area locations, including the intersection of Wilshire Boulevard and Doheny Drive in Beverly Hills. Although the 27 Sep 1966 DV indicated that McCarthy was interested in rounding out the ensemble with foreign stars such as Marcello Mastroianni, the 14 Nov 1966 LAT published a lineup of eleven American actors who agreed to make “cameo” appearances. Credited in the cast as “technical advisers,” these stars act out a series of vignettes, which are intercut throughout the film as “Ed Stander” coaches “Paul Manning” in the “do’s and don’ts of extramarital flings.” A 12 Dec 1966 DV item announced that production had been temporarily halted to accommodate Carl Reiner’s availability. The 2 Dec 1966 LAT also noted the hiring of teenage actor Julius Johnson, but he is not credited onscreen.
       As suggested by the 20 Dec 1966 DV, Matthau and Morse had completed photography earlier that month, but were recalled to film a new, added scene after both recovered from the flu. Three days later, DV reported that director Gene Kelly had also fallen ill, and final pickup shots were completed by assistant director Paul Helmick.
       The 13 Apr 1967 DV announced that the California premiere was scheduled to take place 28 Apr 1967 as part of Palm Springs’ Desert Circus. An additional screening was held in the 340-seat theater onboard the S.S. Canberra as the P&O cruise ship sailed from Vancouver, Canada, to San Francisco, CA, en route to England. According to the 26 Apr 1967 Var, Fox left the print onboard until its scheduled stop in Florida, thereby allowing passengers and crew to view the film during their journey. Meanwhile, items in the 21 Apr 1967 and 25 May 1967 NYT reported that the New York City premiere would take place 24 May 1967 at the Forum and Murray Hill Theaters, followed by a regular engagement two days later. The 7 Jun 1967 LAT advertised the Los Angeles opening on 14 Jun 1967 at the Crest Theater in Westwood.
       Despite a report in the 7 Jan 1967 LAT about a proposed sequel, A Guide for the Married Woman, plans for a theatrical film did not move ahead. However, Twentieth Century Fox Television released a television movie with that same title in 1978. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
13 Apr 1966
p. 4.
Daily Variety
26 Jul 1966
p. 10.
Daily Variety
29 Jul 1966
p. 1.
Daily Variety
9 Aug 1966
p. 2.
Daily Variety
27 Sep 1966
p. 2.
Daily Variety
30 Sep 1966
p. 20.
Daily Variety
10 Oct 1966
p. 15.
Daily Variety
25 Oct 1966
p. 2.
Daily Variety
12 Dec 1966
p. 2.
Daily Variety
20 Dec 1966
p. 2.
Daily Variety
23 Dec 1966
p. 2.
Daily Variety
25 Jan 1967
p. 14.
Daily Variety
13 Apr 1967
p. 2.
Los Angeles Times
8 Aug 1966
Section C, p. 25.
Los Angeles Times
19 Sep 1966
Section C, p. 28.
Los Angeles Times
7 Oct 1966
Section D, p. 15.
Los Angeles Times
14 Nov 1966
Section D, p. 23.
Los Angeles Times
2 Dec 1966
Section D, p. 27.
Los Angeles Times
7 Jan 1967
p. 19.
Los Angeles Times
7 Jun 1967
Section F, p. 17.
Los Angeles Times
14 Jun 1967
Section C, p. 1, 13.
New York Times
21 Apr 1967
p. 42.
New York Times
25 May 1967
p. 57.
Variety
26 Apr 1967
p. 30.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
COSTUMES
Cost supv
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec photog eff
Spec photog eff
Spec photog eff
Titles
MAKEUP
Makeup
Hairstyles
PRODUCTION MISC
Unit prod mgr
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel A Guide for the Married Man, as Told to Frank Tarloff by Frank Tarloff (Los Angeles, 1967).
AUTHOR
SONGS
"A Guide for the Married Man" words and music by Leslie Bricusse and Johnny Williams, sung by The Turtles.
PERFORMER
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
The Affair: A Guide for the Married Man
Release Date:
26 May 1967
Premiere Information:
Palm Springs Desert Circus premiere: 28 April 1967
New York premiere: 24 May 1967
New York opening: 26 May 1967
Los Angeles opening: 14 June 1967
Production Date:
10 October--December 1966
Copyright Claimant:
Twentieth Century--Fox Film Corp.
Copyright Date:
24 May 1967
Copyright Number:
LP34449
Physical Properties:
Sound
Westrex
Color
De Luxe
Widescreen/ratio
Panavision
Duration(in mins):
89
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Paul Manning realizes to his dismay that after 12 happy years of marriage he is becoming increasingly distracted by other women. He is particularly attracted to his neighbor, Irma Johnson. To make matters worse, his philandering friend, Ed Stander, claims that to preserve a marriage, the husband should secretly indulge in a little extramarital activity. As a gesture of true camaraderie, Ed volunteers to teach Paul the finer points of wife-cheating and illustrates his lectures with stories of friends who have had successful or unsuccessful affairs. Paul proves to be a willing and able pupil and easily manipulates his unsuspecting wife, Ruth, into suggesting that he occasionally spend a night at the steam baths. Paul then carefully selects his first target, Jocelyn Montgomery, a seductive divorcée who must also practice discretion to protect her alimony. A remote motel is chosen, and a rendezvous is arranged. But once alone in the bedroom with Jocelyn, Paul's thoughts turn to Ruth, and he shows the unbelieving Jocelyn snapshots of his family. Suddenly, police sirens and screams are heard as police raid a motel across the way. Photographers take pictures of a startled, undressed man--Ed Stander--entertaining Irma Johnson. Paul takes one quick look, leaps into his clothes, pushes Jocelyn into his car, dumps her off at a parking lot, and races home to his ... +


Paul Manning realizes to his dismay that after 12 happy years of marriage he is becoming increasingly distracted by other women. He is particularly attracted to his neighbor, Irma Johnson. To make matters worse, his philandering friend, Ed Stander, claims that to preserve a marriage, the husband should secretly indulge in a little extramarital activity. As a gesture of true camaraderie, Ed volunteers to teach Paul the finer points of wife-cheating and illustrates his lectures with stories of friends who have had successful or unsuccessful affairs. Paul proves to be a willing and able pupil and easily manipulates his unsuspecting wife, Ruth, into suggesting that he occasionally spend a night at the steam baths. Paul then carefully selects his first target, Jocelyn Montgomery, a seductive divorcée who must also practice discretion to protect her alimony. A remote motel is chosen, and a rendezvous is arranged. But once alone in the bedroom with Jocelyn, Paul's thoughts turn to Ruth, and he shows the unbelieving Jocelyn snapshots of his family. Suddenly, police sirens and screams are heard as police raid a motel across the way. Photographers take pictures of a startled, undressed man--Ed Stander--entertaining Irma Johnson. Paul takes one quick look, leaps into his clothes, pushes Jocelyn into his car, dumps her off at a parking lot, and races home to his wife. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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