The Wheeler Dealers (1963)

106 mins | Comedy | 1963

Director:

Arthur Hiller

Producer:

Martin Ransohoff

Cinematographer:

Charles Lang Jr.

Editor:

Tom McAdoo

Production Designers:

George W. Davis, Addison Hehr

Production Company:

Filmways, Inc.
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PERSONAL & COMPANY INDEX CREDITS
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Martin Ransohoff Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Charles Lang
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
COSTUMES
Miss Remick's ward des
MUSIC
Mus
SOUND
Rec supv
MAKEUP
Hairstyles
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
Title des
Title des
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel The Wheeler Dealers by George J. W. Goodman (Garden City, N. Y., 1959).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
SONGS
"The Wheeler Dealers," music and lyrics by Randy Sparks.
SONGWRITER/COMPOSER
DETAILS
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 14 Nov 1963
Production Date:

Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Filmways, Inc.
24 July 1963
LP26162
Physical Properties:
Sound
Westrex
Color
Metrocolor
Widescreen/ratio
Panavision
Duration(in mins):
106
Country:
United States
SYNOPSIS

"Wheeler-Dealer" Henry Tyroon comes to New York to raise more than a million dollars to finance a business scheme. He meets Molly Thatcher, a Wall Street stock analyst, whose boss, Bullard Bear, has assigned her to boost a stock (Universal Widget) that--though not to her knowledge--is apparently worthless. Molly's salary is an expense the firm can no longer afford, and they wish to be rid of her. Henry decides to help Molly with Universal Widget, maneuvering her boyfriend out of the way and dating her himself. Among the other side interests that Henry buys while in the city are a taxicab and driver, a chic restaurant, an art collection, and an abstract artist named Stanislas. In Massachusetts, Molly and Henry discover that Widgets went out of production in 1854, but they create an advertising campaign to promote the stock. They meet the Whipples, laconic New Englanders who own the hidden assets of Universal Widget, now a booming concern, and Henry strikes oil on Widget property. As Widget stock soars, a suspicious SEC investigates; and Henry, Molly, the Whipples, and assorted other characters are taken to court. Henry is revealed as a Yale man, not a Texan, and the Widget oil is discovered to stem from a pipeline. Molly, eased out of her job at this point, believes Henry responsible. A judge throws the confusing case out of court, ruling that the manipulation of Universal Widget is not against public interest. The Whipples own 48 percent, a group of Henry's Texas cronies own 48 percent, and Henry owns the controlling 4 percent of the stock. He sells his shares to the Whipples for the money he needs to support his ...

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"Wheeler-Dealer" Henry Tyroon comes to New York to raise more than a million dollars to finance a business scheme. He meets Molly Thatcher, a Wall Street stock analyst, whose boss, Bullard Bear, has assigned her to boost a stock (Universal Widget) that--though not to her knowledge--is apparently worthless. Molly's salary is an expense the firm can no longer afford, and they wish to be rid of her. Henry decides to help Molly with Universal Widget, maneuvering her boyfriend out of the way and dating her himself. Among the other side interests that Henry buys while in the city are a taxicab and driver, a chic restaurant, an art collection, and an abstract artist named Stanislas. In Massachusetts, Molly and Henry discover that Widgets went out of production in 1854, but they create an advertising campaign to promote the stock. They meet the Whipples, laconic New Englanders who own the hidden assets of Universal Widget, now a booming concern, and Henry strikes oil on Widget property. As Widget stock soars, a suspicious SEC investigates; and Henry, Molly, the Whipples, and assorted other characters are taken to court. Henry is revealed as a Yale man, not a Texan, and the Widget oil is discovered to stem from a pipeline. Molly, eased out of her job at this point, believes Henry responsible. A judge throws the confusing case out of court, ruling that the manipulation of Universal Widget is not against public interest. The Whipples own 48 percent, a group of Henry's Texas cronies own 48 percent, and Henry owns the controlling 4 percent of the stock. He sells his shares to the Whipples for the money he needs to support his business scheme, and he and Molly patch up their quarrel and decide to marry.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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