Pin Up Girl (1944)

83 or 85 mins | Romantic comedy | May 1944

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HISTORY

The working title of this film was Imagine Us . The title was also listed as Pin-Up Girl in contemporary sources. According to an Oct 1942 HR news item, Linda Darnell and Don Ameche were tentatively set for the leading roles when Twentieth Century-Fox purchased Libbie Block's short story. Although the news item also announced that Block would be adapting her story for the screen, studio records indicate that she did not work on the picture's screenplay. After the studio decided to make the story a musical starring Betty Grable, its premise was changed to take advantage of Grable's status as the most popular "pin-up girl" of World War II. The famous photograph, in which Grable, clad in a bathing suit and high heels, looks over her shoulder at the camera behind her, became one of the most indelible images of the era.
       HR news items noted that Richard Arlen conferred with producer William LeBaron and director Bruce Humberstone about appearing in the picture, and that James Engler tested for the leading role opposite Grable. According to a 10 Jun 1943 HR news item, Angela Blue and Virginia Maples assisted Hermes Pan in working out "dance patterns" for the film, which then were to be taught to Grable. Although both Pan and Blue are listed on the CBCS, Maples' appearance in the completed film has not been confirmed. A 29 Jun 1943 HR news item announced that Pan would direct routines featuring the Roller Skating Vanities, of which Gloria Nord was the star, but Nord's appearance in the released picture has not ... More Less

The working title of this film was Imagine Us . The title was also listed as Pin-Up Girl in contemporary sources. According to an Oct 1942 HR news item, Linda Darnell and Don Ameche were tentatively set for the leading roles when Twentieth Century-Fox purchased Libbie Block's short story. Although the news item also announced that Block would be adapting her story for the screen, studio records indicate that she did not work on the picture's screenplay. After the studio decided to make the story a musical starring Betty Grable, its premise was changed to take advantage of Grable's status as the most popular "pin-up girl" of World War II. The famous photograph, in which Grable, clad in a bathing suit and high heels, looks over her shoulder at the camera behind her, became one of the most indelible images of the era.
       HR news items noted that Richard Arlen conferred with producer William LeBaron and director Bruce Humberstone about appearing in the picture, and that James Engler tested for the leading role opposite Grable. According to a 10 Jun 1943 HR news item, Angela Blue and Virginia Maples assisted Hermes Pan in working out "dance patterns" for the film, which then were to be taught to Grable. Although both Pan and Blue are listed on the CBCS, Maples' appearance in the completed film has not been confirmed. A 29 Jun 1943 HR news item announced that Pan would direct routines featuring the Roller Skating Vanities, of which Gloria Nord was the star, but Nord's appearance in the released picture has not been confirmed.
       Other actors included by HR news items in the cast are Helen Craig, Mae Marsh and Ruth Clifford, but their appearance in the completed film has not been confirmed. Hercules and Dolly, "midget comedy weight-lifters" who were included in the cast by a HR news item, do not appear in the final picture. Although a 20 Apr 1943 HR news item noted that "This Is It," "Tell Us More" and "Little Caballero" were among the songs written by Mack Gordon and James Monaco for the production, they were not included in the finished film. Pin Up Girl marked the feature film debut of band leader Charlie Spivak. Actress Martha Raye and dancer Nicholas Condos were married in Feb 1944 and divorced in 1953, although Condos continued to act as Raye's personal manager until his death in 1988. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
22 Apr 1944.
---
Daily Variety
19 Apr 44
p. 4.
Film Daily
25 Apr 44
p. 11.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Oct 42
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
31 Mar 43
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Apr 43
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
25 May 43
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
8 Jun 43
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Jun 43
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
29 Jun 43
p. 16.
Hollywood Reporter
9 Jul 43
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
26 Aug 43
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
7 Sep 43
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
21 Sep 43
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
27 Sep 43
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
4 Oct 43
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Oct 43
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
25 Oct 43
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
19 Apr 44
p. 3, 6
Hollywood Reporter
15 May 44
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
2 Jun 44
p. 3.
Los Angeles Examiner
26 May 1944.
---
Motion Picture Daily
19 Apr 1944.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
22 May 44
p. 1857.
New York Times
11 May 44
p. 25.
Variety
19 Apr 44
p. 12.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
PRODUCER
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Assoc
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Mus dir
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec photog eff
DANCE
Dances staged by
Military number staged by
Mus numbers supv
Roller skating number by
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
PRODUCTION MISC
Unit prod mgr
COLOR PERSONNEL
Technicolor dir
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the short story "Imagine Us!" by Libbie Block in Good Housekeeping (1 Dec 1942).
AUTHOR
SONGS
"You're My Little Pin Up Girl," "The Story of the Very Merry Widow," "Time Alone Will Tell," "Yankee Doodle Hayride," "Once Too Often" and "Don't Carry Tales Out of School," music by James V. Monaco, lyrics by Mack Gordon
"Red Robins, Bob Whites and Bluebirds," music by James Monaco, lyrics by Mack Gordon, special lyrics by Charles Henderson.
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Imagine Us
Release Date:
May 1944
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 11 May 1944
Los Angeles opening: 25 May 1944
Production Date:
8 July--23 October 1943
Copyright Claimant:
Twentieth Century--Fox Film Corp.
Copyright Date:
10 May 1944
Copyright Number:
LP12839
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Recording
Color
Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
83 or 85
Length(in feet):
7,450
Length(in reels):
9
Country:
United States
PCA No:
9534
SYNOPSIS

Beautiful Lorry Jones is the favorite hostess at the local U.S.O canteen in Missoula, Missouri, where she performs and signs photographs of herself for the adoring soldiers. Lorry routinely accepts the marriage proposal of any soldier who asks, and her latest suitor, Marine George Davis, does not realize that the flirtatious, fibbing Lorry has no intention of marrying him. Lorry and her best friend, Kay Pritchett, take civil service jobs to become stenographers in Washington, D.C., but Lorry tells everyone at the canteen that she is going on a U.S.O. tour. Kay reprimands Lorry for lying, but is persuaded by her to visit New York City for one night before reporting for work. When they arrive at the train station in New York, Lorry and Kay watch a welcoming committee greet Tommy Dooley, a Navy hero of the battle of Guadalcanal. That night, the two women try to get into the Club Chartreuse, but are told that women without escorts are not allowed. Lorry then tells headwaiter Pierre that they are meeting the celebrated Tommy and his pal, Dud Miller, and Pierre shows them to the best table in the club. Unknown to Lorry and Kay, Tommy is old friends with Eddie Hall, the club's owner, and is expected to arrive shortly. Eddie, who believes that Tommy invited the girls, lavishes them with champagne, and when Tommy and Dud arrive, they think that Eddie set them up with Lorry and Kay as blind dates. Dud believes that the women are actresses, but before Lorry can tell the truth for once, the drunken Kay states that they are in the Broadway musical comedy ... +


Beautiful Lorry Jones is the favorite hostess at the local U.S.O canteen in Missoula, Missouri, where she performs and signs photographs of herself for the adoring soldiers. Lorry routinely accepts the marriage proposal of any soldier who asks, and her latest suitor, Marine George Davis, does not realize that the flirtatious, fibbing Lorry has no intention of marrying him. Lorry and her best friend, Kay Pritchett, take civil service jobs to become stenographers in Washington, D.C., but Lorry tells everyone at the canteen that she is going on a U.S.O. tour. Kay reprimands Lorry for lying, but is persuaded by her to visit New York City for one night before reporting for work. When they arrive at the train station in New York, Lorry and Kay watch a welcoming committee greet Tommy Dooley, a Navy hero of the battle of Guadalcanal. That night, the two women try to get into the Club Chartreuse, but are told that women without escorts are not allowed. Lorry then tells headwaiter Pierre that they are meeting the celebrated Tommy and his pal, Dud Miller, and Pierre shows them to the best table in the club. Unknown to Lorry and Kay, Tommy is old friends with Eddie Hall, the club's owner, and is expected to arrive shortly. Eddie, who believes that Tommy invited the girls, lavishes them with champagne, and when Tommy and Dud arrive, they think that Eddie set them up with Lorry and Kay as blind dates. Dud believes that the women are actresses, but before Lorry can tell the truth for once, the drunken Kay states that they are in the Broadway musical comedy Remember Me . Molly McKay, Eddie's jealous star singer, is suspicious of Kay's claim, but Lorry, who gives her name as Laura Lorraine, easily performs a number from the show. Tommy and Dud happily spend the rest of the evening dancing with their "blind dates," and in the morning, see them off at the train station. The men inadvertently lose the girls's address, and as two weeks pass, Lorry and Kay fret over not hearing from their beaus. Lorry is bored by the simple life of a stenographer but soon has her hands full when Tommy and Dud arrive in Washington, where they are to report on their combat experiences. Chief Barney Briggs assigns Lorry to take Tommy's statement, and, not wanting Tommy to know that she lied to him, Lorry disguises herself so that Tommy will not recognize her as "Laura Lorraine." Lorry arranges for Tommy and the glamorous "Laura" to have a date, and after Tommy declares his love for her, he tells her how important it is to him to have a girl who is "on the level." Upset, Lorry states that she is giving up the stage and returning home, and so Tommy arranges for her to get a job at Eddie's new club in Washington. Molly is infuriated by the arrangement, but sees an opportunity to get rid of Lorry when George, who has seen her picture in the newspaper, arrives and states that he is Lorry's fiancé. Eddie, however, is thrilled to learn that Lorry is a popular pin-up girl, and uses her photograph, in which she poses in a bathing suit, to advertise the new show. On Lorry's opening night, Molly introduces Tommy to George, and the angry Tommy leaves the club without seeing Lorry. When Lorry learns what has happened, she tells George that their engagement is not real, and in her stenographer clothes, asks Tommy to give "Laura" another chance. Tommy refuses and instead asks Lorry to accompany him to the club, where he can show "Laura" that he has gotten over her. At the club, Lorry performs in her stenographer clothes, thereby revealing her true identity to both Tommy and Eddie. After Tommy learns that she is not engaged to George, Lorry leads an elaborate marching drill. As she and Tommy exchange smiles, she realizes that he has forgiven her. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.